Thread: Slava Transistor...

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  1. #31
    Member mike.s's Avatar
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    Re: Slava Transistor...

    I beleive that one changed hands on eBay recently for $400 or so in working condition (well, let's call it "eBay working condition").

    Seeing that Accutron Spaceview in very good shape would cost about that much... make your own conclusions about the value. I would like to get one if I could, but for this amount of money, I'm not at all sure.

  2. #32
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    Re: Slava Transistor...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Jehosaphat View Post
    I find this to be an interesting statement! What would be considered a "premium" price for this watch in non-working condition?

    Also, I've seen estimated production quantities in the range of "a few hundred" to exactly 2,000.

    Is there a conclusive number?

    Finally, it appears that all references I find to this watch turn up non-working examples. What usually goes wrong with these watches, and why?

    TIA
    This Slava was based on the Bulova Accutron ( do a Google and you will find lot’s of info).

    The reason why these watches don’t work any more in the precision needed to produce and to keep the precession of these parts.

    The heart of the watch is a Tuning Fork ( similar to the one we use for music) . It hums with 360 movements per second. By keeping it in resonance through an electric circuit using a simple transistor very low power is needed to keep it going and so create a relative long battery life.
    The problem is the mechanical ratchet wheel which is connected to the tuning fork and which changes the lateral movement into a circular movement.

    That ratchet wheel was an outstanding technical achievement: 2.4 mm in diameter, 0.04 mm thick and 300 teeth, each 1/100 mm high !

    That wheel always breaks down and there are no spare available. Also watchmakers are/were not used to handle this delicate part. So will see a lot of watches where the tuning fork/wheel is missing.

    Production quantitie was 1000 according the two references I have. The reason they appear now more and more is ……… this forum.
    Do you realize that what is written here on this forum triggers a lot interest both commercially for sellers who see business as well as demand from collectors.


    Tammo

  3. #33
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    Re: Slava Transistor...

    Quote Originally Posted by _Tammo_ View Post
    This Slava was based on the Bulova Accutron ( do a Google and you will find lot’s of info).

    The reason why these watches don’t work any more in the precision needed to produce and to keep the precession of these parts.

    The heart of the watch is a Tuning Fork ( similar to the one we use for music) . It hums with 360 movements per second. By keeping it in resonance through an electric circuit using a simple transistor very low power is needed to keep it going and so create a relative long battery life.
    The problem is the mechanical ratchet wheel which is connected to the tuning fork and which changes the lateral movement into a circular movement.

    That ratchet wheel was an outstanding technical achievement: 2.4 mm in diameter, 0.04 mm thick and 300 teeth, each 1/100 mm high !

    That wheel always breaks down and there are no spare available. Also watchmakers are/were not used to handle this delicate part. So will see a lot of watches where the tuning fork/wheel is missing.

    Production quantitie was 1000 according the two references I have. The reason they appear now more and more is ……… this forum.
    Do you realize that what is written here on this forum triggers a lot interest both commercially for sellers who see business as well as demand from collectors.


    Tammo
    Thanks for the information Tammo!

    I take it that if it is a copy of the Accutron that a ratchet wheel (or any other part) from a Bulova movement could be used to repair the Slava, theoretically speaking?

    TIA

  4. #34
    Member ecalzo's Avatar
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    Re: Slava Transistor...

    wordless....
    G-Shocks and subs

  5. #35
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    Re: Slava Transistor...

    Thanks for the information Tammo!
    Jack Jehosaphat wrote:

    I take it that if it is a copy of the Accutron that a ratchet wheel (or any other part) from a Bulova movement could be used to repair the Slava, theoretically speaking?

    TIA
    This is partially true. I just acquired a Slava Transistor, and have repaired it to working condition. It is running and keeping good time now. Fortunately the coils and circuit were all working. There was some rust in various places (mostly on the pawl bridge, and screws) that was carefully cleaned. But worst of all, the index wheel was damaged beyond use...all of the teeth were worn down to almost nothing. This is similar to the situation that occurs on Omega F300's when the center clutch is too tight and the movement spins during time setting. This destroys the index wheel.

    Fortunately the index wheel is of the same configuration, and overall size as the 214. However, the pivots are smaller in diameter. I filed down the pivots on a new 214 index wheel to fit.

    Screws are the same sizes, as are many of the other components. I did not try swapping out parts to see what would fit, but I suspect many of them would swap. One interesting difference is that the movement outer diameter is larger than the 214 so that it does not fit into the Accutron 214 movement holder. However, a standard case gasket will still work.

    In general, the Slava is the most comparible to the early 214 design. The visual appearance of the circuit is striking, and very different from the 214. Each solder joint has a red dot of material that has been applied to it. The index fingers do not have stress reliever bars which is similar to early 214's. The tuning fork magnets are more finely machined, the jewels are smaller in diameter, and there are lots of other more subtile differences. It is clear that none of the parts were taken from existing Accutrons to make the Slavas. I took lots of "before" pictures, and plan to post them soon. Some before pictures can be seen now on ebay item #190334238596 where I acquired it.

    -John Schult
    Now wearing my Slava Transistor
    www.accutrons.com
    Last edited by turbinej; October 2nd, 2009 at 15:57. Reason: clarification

  6. #36
    Member michele's Avatar
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    Re: Slava Transistor...

    Quote Originally Posted by turbinej View Post
    This is partially true. I just acquired a Slava Transistor, and have repaired it to working condition. It is running and keeping good time now. Fortunately the coils and circuit were all working. There was some rust in various places (mostly on the pawl bridge, and screws) that was carefully cleaned. But worst of all, the index wheel was damaged beyond use...all of the teeth were worn down to almost nothing. This is similar to the situation that occurs on Omega F300's when the center clutch is too tight and the movement spins during time setting. This destroys the index wheel.

    Fortunately the index wheel is of the same configuration, and overall size as the 214. However, the pivots are smaller in diameter. I filed down the pivots on a new 214 index wheel to fit.

    Screws are the same sizes, as are many of the other components. I did not try swapping out parts to see what would fit, but I suspect many of them would swap. One interesting difference is that the movement outer diameter is larger than the 214 so that it does not fit into the Accutron 214 movement holder. However, a standard case gasket will still work.

    In general, the Slava is the most comparible to the early 214 design. The visual appearance of the circuit is striking, and very different from the 214. Each solder joint has a red dot of material that has been applied to it. The index fingers do not have stress reliever bars which is similar to early 214's. The tuning fork magnets are more finely machined, the jewels are smaller in diameter, and there are lots of other more subtile differences. It is clear that none of the parts were taken from existing Accutrons to make the Slavas. I took lots of "before" pictures, and plan to post them soon. Some before pictures can be seen now on ebay item #190334238596 where I acquired it.

    -John Schult
    Now wearing my Slava Transistor
    www.accutrons.com
    This is a fantastic new Even not being an owner of a Slava Transistor, it's nice to know that these watches (always available in non-working conditions till now) can be partially fixed with Bulova components.

    If you can, make a video of the watch in working conditions - the smooth movement of a tuning fork watch is always nice to see.

    former Russian Watch Forum Moderator (2005-2012)

  7. #37
    Member turbinej's Avatar
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    Cool Re: Slava Transistor...

    Quote Originally Posted by michele View Post
    This is a fantastic new Even not being an owner of a Slava Transistor, it's nice to know that these watches (always available in non-working conditions till now) can be partially fixed with Bulova components.

    If you can, make a video of the watch in working conditions - the smooth movement of a tuning fork watch is always nice to see.
    OK. I have pictures, and a video now. You can find them at:
    www.accutrons.com/pages/slava.html for pictures (as found, before overhaul)
    www.accutrons.com/pages/slavavideo.html for the video of the watch running after the overhaul. Both front view in case, and back view out of case.

    Enjoy

    -John Schult
    Now Wearing my Slava Transistor.

  8. #38
    Member michele's Avatar
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    Re: Slava Transistor...

    Quote Originally Posted by turbinej View Post
    OK. I have pictures, and a video now. You can find them at:
    www.accutrons.com/pages/slava.html for pictures (as found, before overhaul)
    www.accutrons.com/pages/slavavideo.html for the video of the watch running after the overhaul. Both front view in case, and back view out of case.

    Enjoy

    -John Schult
    Now Wearing my Slava Transistor.

    former Russian Watch Forum Moderator (2005-2012)

  9. #39
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    Re: Slava Transistor...

    Very nice resotration of an important Russian watch.

    Making your own parts is impressive.

  10. #40
    Member turbinej's Avatar
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    Re: Slava Transistor...Restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by watch22 View Post
    Very nice resotration of an important Russian watch.

    Making your own parts is impressive.
    In the end, I only needed 4 parts:
    -NOS Accutron 214 index wheel with reduced diameter pivots
    -A missing screw (1 of 3) used to secure the train bridge
    -New crystal
    -Leather band...the original band was missing.
    ...and lots of cleaning, and rust removal. The cannon pinion is severly pitted from corrosion, but still functions. The 214 Accutron pinion could be used, however, the inner diameter would have to be drilled out to fit.

    I am pleased it did not require many parts to make it functional, and that the dial is in such good shape. I will keep the 2 replaced parts for future reference.

    I don't know for sure, but the damage found on the original index wheel could be indicative of a softer material being used.

    I also noticed that the index fingers are much more resiliant than the 214 Accutron fingers. They are much more resistant to bending, so if they are out of adjustment, they have to be over-bent more to get them re-shaped. This made them more resistant to damage, but could have generated excessive forces on the index wheel if out of adjustment. Perhaps that was partly the cause of the excessive index wheel wear.

    -John

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