Very Confused. Dennison/Waltham pocket watch case.

Thread: Very Confused. Dennison/Waltham pocket watch case.

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  1. #1
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    Very Confused. Dennison/Waltham pocket watch case.

    Hello All,
    I have a Waltham hunter with a Dennison Moon case. It is marked "Made of two plates of 10ct gold with plate of composition between".
    Looking on the web there are various opinions most of which suggest that this is gold plate or gold filled.
    The plates have no hallmarks.
    To my simple mind "Made of two plates of 10ct gold" means made of 10ct gold.
    Am I wrong and was this clever marketing by Dennison?
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  2. #2
    Moderator Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: Very Confused. Dennison/Waltham pocket watch case.

    RGP = rolled gold plate. It consists of two sheets of gold pressure welded to an inner sheet of brass. By weight (and volume) it is mostly brass.

    RGP's gold is much thicker than modern electroplated gold plate. I suspect it is more thick than about 80 microns of gold plating - the thickest I have ever seen electroplate.
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  3. #3
    Member AbslomRob's Avatar
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    Re: Very Confused. Dennison/Waltham pocket watch case.

    It means exactly what it says: two plates of 10ct gold, with a plate of some other metal (composition) between them. Gold items for sale in the U.K. have to be clearly marked (they're rather particular about that). The stuff between the gold is irrelevant and can be anything that isn't a recognized "precious metal", hence the rather imprecise description. The U.K. didn't recognize the terms "gold filled" or "Rolled gold", so they couldn't legally use that.
    My growing collection of "affordable" vintages: http://www.abslomrob.com

  4. #4
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    Re: Very Confused. Dennison/Waltham pocket watch case.

    Thanks Rob, As you say the UK is very particular which is why I'm surprised it's not hallmarked. However I'm very happy if it is gold as it was sold to me as gold plated :)

  5. #5
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    Re: Very Confused. Dennison/Waltham pocket watch case.

    Thanks Eeeb, For clarity are you saying that "Two plates of 10ct gold" means two RGP rolled gold plates?

  6. #6
    Member AbslomRob's Avatar
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    Re: Very Confused. Dennison/Waltham pocket watch case.

    Its NOT gold. It IS effectively gold plate. The two "Gold plates" mentioned in the the description are very very thin relative to the "composition" plate mentioned. Not sure what the rules were back then, but I think nowadays the rule of thumb is that the amount of gold has to be at least 20% of the weight of the object. That's 20% 10k gold. So if the case weighed (random number) 50g, you'd only have around 3.5g of actual gold in there (and probably much less since the gold gets worn off through repeated handling).
    My growing collection of "affordable" vintages: http://www.abslomrob.com

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