ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches - Page 2
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  1. #11
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    Re: ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by Trandy View Post
    Fascinating....thanks for posting thing.

    BTW.....what 5600XL is the article referring to?
    From the pictures, it looks like he's talking about a GXW-56BB.

  2. #12
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    Re: ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveJ View Post
    Check out Gunto swords, which are mostly WW2 trophy bring homes.
    They are mostly nothing like traditional Katanas, certainly not in quality. Although some were re-bladed with family blades which are more rare and valuable.
    The Guntos were mass produced to be used as mainly symbols of rank .
    Interestingly the Japanese declared all Guntos as "not swords" and it is illegal in Japan to own or sell them.
    I have two Imperial Japanese Army NCO "kyu-gunto"/western styled examples that I paid way less than $150. each for.
    They are WW2 victory trophies and the sakuras are intact .
    Gunto swords were military issued swords with homogenous steel blades that were designed to be cheap and mass produced, they looked like a nihonto sword (tachi, katana, wakizashi...) but they weren't at all. According to Japanese law guntos are classified as weapons, thus their ownership is restricted, while a nihonto produced with traditional lamination technique is considered an object of art of historical value...30K for a blade produced according to the traditional lamination process is a fair price IMO, as it requires many weeks of work, like the Western pattern welded swords that were produced in Europe with a similar technique until the VIIIth century.

  3. #13
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    Re: ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches

    Thank you for posting this GK!
    GaryK30 and SteveJ like this.
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    Re: ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches

    Great article.
    GaryK30 and SteveJ like this.
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    Re: ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches

    Thanks for sharing
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  6. #16
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    Re: ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by cuthbert View Post
    Gunto swords were military issued swords with homogenous steel blades that were designed to be cheap and mass produced, they looked like a nihonto sword (tachi, katana, wakizashi...) but they weren't at all. According to Japanese law guntos are classified as weapons, thus their ownership is restricted, while a nihonto produced with traditional lamination technique is considered an object of art of historical value...30K for a blade produced according to the traditional lamination process is a fair price IMO, as it requires many weeks of work, like the Western pattern welded swords that were produced in Europe with a similar technique until the VIIIth century.
    "Gunto sword " means "military sword".
    Not all Guntos were patterned after traditional Katanas. The Kyu-Guntos which were first used during the Russian Japanese war were western patterns where the hilts were designed to be two handed. Later in Manchuria and WW2 this same pattern was used, mostly by the IJA but also by the other military branches and even the Japanese police and occupation forces, but designed as traditional western one handed hilts. The traditional styled Guntos were used also. Both by commissioned and non commissioned officers, both in parade dress and field dress. Some, but only a very small number of the standard issue traditional Katana styled swords were re-bladed by individuals with traditional katana blades, usually of the individuals familial origin.
    The specific translation of wording of the Japanese determination of status of ALL Guntos was "NOT swords". This had nothing to do with the homogeneous steel blade, or their generally shoddy wartime construction, but with the fact that the VAST majority of field used Guntos were captured as war trophies.
    That way the Japanese would not have to recognize the capture of Japanese symbols of rank during WAR. I respect the Japanese, but they are what they are, and it is objective and provable fact that to this day Yasukuni and their history books do not accept any national responsibility for their part in the "disagreements" of the 20th century.
    $30K for an authentic , historical patterned steel Katana et. al. is cheap. Blades by famous historical makers and/or bushi/owners are orders of magnitudes higher.
    Last edited by SteveJ; 3 Days Ago at 05:12. Reason: factual accuracy

  7. #17
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    Re: ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveJ View Post
    "Gunto sword " means "military sword".
    Not all Guntos were patterned after traditional Katanas. The Kyu-Guntos which were first used during the Russian Japanese war were western patterns where the hilts were designed to be two handed. Later in Manchuria and WW2 this same pattern was used, mostly by the IJA but also by the other military branches and even the Japanese police and occupation forces, but designed as traditional western one handed hilts. The traditional styled Guntos were used also. Both by commissioned and non commissioned officers, both in parade dress and field dress. Some, but only a very small number of the standard issue traditional Katana styled swords were re-bladed by individuals with traditional katana blades, usually of the individuals familial origin.
    The specific translation of wording of the Japanese determination of status of ALL Guntos was "NOT swords". This had nothing to do with the homogeneous steel blade, or their generally shoddy wartime construction, but with the fact that the VAST majority of field used Guntos were captured as war trophies.
    That way the Japanese would not have to recognize the capture of Japanese symbols of rank during WAR. I respect the Japanese, but they are what they are, and it is objective and provable fact that to this day Yasukuni and their history books do not accept any national responsibility for their part in the "disagreements" of the 20th century.
    $30K for an authentic , historical patterned steel Katana et. al. is cheap. Blades by famous historical makers and/or bushi/owners are orders of magnitudes higher.
    As written above I'm interested in swordmaking and metallurgy in general: not all guntos were captured (obviously) but most of them were confiscated after the surrender by American authorities not because they wanted as war trophies but because they wanted to disarm the Japanese military, so guns and swords were to be delivered. The Americans wanted to make the possession of blades illegal in the attempt to "defang" the Japanese Imperialism, that would have included the "real swords" (nihonto), then the government petitioned McArthur and made their case about "historic heritage" (that included new swords made according to the tradition) and in the end he accepted this interpretation, that's the reason why guntos are "not swords". And yes it deals with the manufacturing technique, a nihonto blade mounted as a gunto (very few were made during WWII, they were special prizes for officers who had done something special, like the ace Muto if I remember correctly) is a "real sword". P.S.

    Ok sword thing over, I promise I don't start with Gundam as well.. :P :P :P

  8. #18
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    Re: ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveJ View Post
    Gunto
    That Japanese term literally means "army sword" or "troop sword". Cool find.
    cuthbert and SteveJ like this.

  9. #19
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    Re: ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by Trandy View Post
    Fascinating....thanks for posting thing.

    BTW.....what 5600XL is the article referring to?
    Quote Originally Posted by kevio View Post
    From the pictures, it looks like he's talking about a GXW-56BB.
    Correct. In fact, it's this very watch:

    (In front of the Imperial Palace in Tokyo...)

    As for the sword I'm holding in the article, forget about $50K; its value was measured with six figures...



    Moriai-san was in absolute awe. Honestly, the respect he had for it was beautiful.

    Regards,
    Adam
    Last edited by craniotes; 2 Days Ago at 02:56.
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  10. #20
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    Re: ABTW article: An Afternoon In Tokyo With The Man Who Designs Casio G-Shock Watches

    OK, since we are still talking about swords...this is my pattern welded steel Lombardic sword:

    Name:  celk.JPG
Views: 31
Size:  508.7 KB

    It is patterned after the only original one I had the opportunity to touch and measure with my own hands, 7th century. Although the lamination technique of western swords was slightly different from what the Japanese developed more recently there are remarkable similarities...in Germanic swords the inner part of the blade is composed by larger layers of low and high carbon steel, that can be clearly seen:

    Name:  cep.JPG
Views: 31
Size:  810.0 KB

    For the cutting edges the lamination is the same as for Katanas.

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