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  1. #11
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    Re: How do you buy a watch without feeling guilty?

    Quote Originally Posted by WnS View Post
    You can save money all your life and let your kids inherit your wealth (which they might piss away), or spend some now and enjoy your youth. Buy a decent 4 figure watch, wear it your whole life, and let your kid inherit an heirloom they can remember you by.
    See I don't even like kids. So all my money will just be for me. And I still feel guilty about spending it.
    hookey likes this.

  2. #12
    Moderator at Large stuffler,mike's Avatar
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    Re: How do you buy a watch without feeling guilty?

    Quote Originally Posted by calvincc View Post
    See I don't even like kids. So all my money will just be for me. And I still feel guilty about spending it.
    Well, if you feel that guilty do not buy a watch. It is simple as that. Withstand the stimulus to buy watches. If you can't withstand get psychological help. But be warned. Some shrinks do collect watches and they do not feel guilty at all.
    Kind regards
    Mike


  3. #13
    Member ed21x's Avatar
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    Re: How do you buy a watch without feeling guilty?

    Every man needs 1 nice dress watch, 1 nice casual, and 1 beater, minimum. It's as essential for life,
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  4. #14
    Member ColinW's Avatar
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    Re: How do you buy a watch without feeling guilty?

    You sound like you're doing OK to me and everyone needs hobbies. Throw a bit to charity too and keep up the good work!

  5. #15
    Member mike120's Avatar
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    Re: How do you buy a watch without feeling guilty?

    Quote Originally Posted by ColinW View Post
    You sound like you're doing OK to me and everyone needs hobbies. Throw a bit to charity too and keep up the good work!
    I look at it (and I have spent way too much on my collection for my age) as the only accessory that I wear other than sunglasses (and those are for a medical reason). I have done more for charities than I have done for the watch manufacturers by buying their products, so I feel no qualms!!
    Cheers,

  6. #16
    Member Jakex1's Avatar
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    Re: How do you buy a watch without feeling guilty?

    I've never impulse bought a watch over $2-300. Anything higher than that I lurk the forums for weeks doing research on the movement, quality, then handle it in person a few times.

    Affter a month or two of waiting if I feel I still wan-, NEED the watch ill drop whatever I have to.
    22 and addicted to watches, cars, and whiskey.

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  7. #17
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    Re: How do you buy a watch without feeling guilty?

    One way to rationalize it is certain watches hold value well or appreciate.

    If you get a model you can sell for break even or a slight profit then you might not feel as guilty.
    LosTresGatos likes this.

  8. #18
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    Re: How do you buy a watch without feeling guilty?

    Easy...I think of all the other stupid things I could have blown those funds on. Watches are one of the few affordable items that hold resale pretty well. There are people here actually whining about how their watches aren't APPRECIATING in value like they've hoped. Any other item in my household - electronics, clothing, furniture, appliances, MY CAR - I'd be lucky to get a fraction of the original value back if sold used let alone hope to break even. And that doesn't take into account stuff that has absolutely no return value, like a daily Starbucks coffee.

    Honestly If I ever feel guilty about my spending, the watch habit would be one the last things I scale back rather than one of the first.
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  9. #19
    Member Barry H's Avatar
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    Re: How do you buy a watch without feeling guilty?

    Quote Originally Posted by calvincc View Post
    ... and there really is not justification on spending more than $50 on a watch. So do you avoid feeling guilty after your watch purchase?
    Disagree. There is every justification for spending a reasonable amount on a luxury item if that is what enhances your life. Helps make the world go round. (I'm assuming that the reasonable amount is 'spare cash', of course).

  10. #20
    Member Metlin's Avatar
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    Re: How do you buy a watch without feeling guilty?

    Quote Originally Posted by seoulseeker View Post
    Sometimes I hear money equated to freedom, and that, when buying something (in this case a watch), you are literally trading portions of your freedom for something to hang on your wrist.

    But is it really freedom if you aren't able to use your money how you want? Saving is good, but if you feel trapped into *only* saving, then what is the point of having the money in the first place?

    I'm not saying go spend everything, but I find that there is a good middle ground between saving and spending that makes me enjoy life the most. That's how a justify my watch purchases.
    In a capitalist society, "capital" is accumulated by essentially saving (income, entrepreneurship etc).

    So, how much (or how little) you spend essentially dictates how eager (or not so eager) you are to get to the "capital" part of the pyramid from the wage base. Often, debt represents the chain that holds back people from climbing said pyramid.

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