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Thread: Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

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  1. #1
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    Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

    Im slightly inexperienced and not too sure if this even is a problem, but ill give it a go.

    I recently got my first nice watch, the seamaster 300m quartz for my 21st birthday. Im very pleased with the watch and think its fantastic, however here is my possible problem...the second hand never falls on the increments for the whole 60 seconds, usually just shy of in between.

    I took it back to the very reputable jewellers I bought it from and was told this was quite normal and to just enjoy it. Is this true??

    My previous watch was a nice tissot, nowhere near as dear but it worked perfectly and still does.

    Any help would be appreciated

  2. #2
    Member zekio's Avatar
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    Re: Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

    yes thats quite comon with quartz watches

  3. #3
    Member searat's Avatar
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    Re: Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

    Don't worry about it - pretty normal for ETA quartz movements used throughout Swatch group models including Tissot and Omega. They're reliable and accurate but for some reason don't always align perfectly with dial printing.
    Steve

    Sinn, Seiko, Yes & G-Shock


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    Re: Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

    Quote Originally Posted by searat View Post
    Don't worry about it - pretty normal for ETA quartz movements used throughout Swatch group models including Tissot and Omega. They're reliable and accurate but for some reason don't always align perfectly with dial printing.
    Steve
    I've always wondered about this.

    I happen to have a 13 year old Tag quartz, and it hits the mark perfectly.

    However, I do know that it is common for other, high end quartz watches to NOT hit their mark.

    Now why can my $200 Casio G-Shock hit the mark EVERY TIME... and even include "Tough Movement" (a feature where the G Shock utilizes an L.E.D. to "automatically check and adjust hand positioning at fifty-five minutes after every hour), but watches which cost over a thousand dollars can't quite hit the minute/hour markers spot on!

    Just seems curious...
    Tag Heuer || Aquaracer
    Casio G Shock || GW 3000B-1A | GW 3500-1A
    Ω Omega || Seamaster Planet Ocean XL 2200.51.00
    Ball || Engineer Hydrocarbon Spacemaster (white dial)
    Baume et Mercier || Unknown
    Seiko
    || Bell-Matic
    Lüm-Tec ||V Series 1/3 Custom

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    Re: Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

    Cheers for the info guys. So really there is no way of making the second hand falling on the mark and I should just accept?

    Another question...I only received a calibre ref card, should I also receive an international warranty card??

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    Re: Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

    If you purchased it brand new, from an Authorized Dealer for Omega, you should have gotten two red cards, one labeled Pictogram, and one labeled International Warranty. If the jeweler you purchased from is not an AD, you may get just the pictogram, or sometimes neither card. If not an AD, jeweler should have provided his own warranty for two years. Generally speaking, grey market dealers will provide their own warranty, which matches Omega's warranty. Hope this helps.

    KAT

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    Member Toothbras's Avatar
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    Re: Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

    Andy, I wouldn't worry about it too much. I also have a SMP quartz and the second hand doesn't quite hit the marks exactly. I got over it, hopefully you can too, this is a pretty common occurance, at least with the Seamaster owners I have talked to. I've wondered why, since it seems like something that should be spot on, but I've also check out other SMPs at jewelers, and most of those are a tad off mark too.

  8. #8
    Member M4tt's Avatar
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    Re: Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

    I've always wondered about this.

    I happen to have a 13 year old Tag quartz, and it hits the mark perfectly.

    However, I do know that it is common for other, high end quartz watches to NOT hit their mark.

    Now why can my $200 Casio G-Shock hit the mark EVERY TIME... and even include "Tough Movement" (a feature where the G Shock utilizes an L.E.D. to "automatically check and adjust hand positioning at fifty-five minutes after every hour), but watches which cost over a thousand dollars can't quite hit the minute/hour markers spot on!

    Just seems curious...
    I know it seems odd, but it really is a sign of quality. By using a jewelled metal train you get a movement which is incredibly robust and long lived. However, there is always going to have to be a small amount of play between each wheel and cog and this will be magnified by the train.

    I hadn't seen the G shock before and I have to admit that the system used is a hilarious example of a massively overcomplicated (and astonishingly poorly implemented) solution looking for a problem. It's the implementation itself which makes the 'hand adjustment' mechanism necessary! The Omega movement uses a simple, elegant solution which avoids all of these pitfalls.

    That's a fairly strong claim, so here's the justification.

    First look at the Gshock solution:

    The New G-Shock Tough Movement | mygshock.com

    The first thing to notice is that there are three stepper motors. When I first saw this sort of independent system, in the Citizen E510, I described it as 'fly by wire' for reasons that will become clear. Each stepper motor controls a single hand through a very short train of both plastic and metal parts. This reduces lash considerably but at the expense of, well, having three stepper motors. In addition, the train, while quite simple for each individual hand adds up to a whole with quite a lot of moving parts. The E510 used this system, but this was a thermocompensated perpetual calender which was capable of a second or two a year performance and which had a powerful IC which didn't need an additional system to tell it where its hands were and which was capable of keeping track of itself and adjusting (in the IC) for the year. The G-shock system is clearly a little less bright as it needs an independent system to tell it where it's hands are (either that or the stepper motors are extremely unreliable and need booting back into line. So, to summarise, the Gshock system has three stepper motors which are mechanically independent but are controlled by an an electronic module. The IC clearly has some issue with keeping track of the hands and so needs a fourth system to ensure that the IC 'knows' where the hands are. To describe this as dramatically overcomplicated is a minor understatement.

    The way I see it, that means there are three stepper motors, an LED and a photosensitive cell (as well as all the supporting stuff) as well as three seperate (admittedly simple) trains. In addition the IC is going to have quite a lot to do with keeping track of three stepper motors, detection of three hands and integration of the three (all of which has to coded). That's a awful lot to go wrong. If there was a reason for it, then it might make sense, but if all this is to ensure that every second mark is hit then, first it's a high price and second, with a little wear it will not work - there is quite enough room between stepper motor (where corrections are made) and what might be called the three final wheels (where measurements are made) to ensure that with a little wear the whole system will become even less precise than the system it is trying to improve on.

    Compared to this the Omega (ETA) system is as dumb as a pile of rocks. The quartz timebase is halved fifteen times in base two to go from 32,768 to 1 (not hard to code and not likely to go wrong) by the IC. This sends a pulse to the stepper motor once a second. This powers a train that would have been familiar to Breguet which does all the necessary maths mechanically in the relations between the teeth of the cogs and wheels. The system simply doesn't need to know where the hands are any more than a stone needs to know about gravity to fall. You set the hands and the stepper motor simply pulses once a second very very precisely. Sure, the system will have more play but it is the simplest, most elegant system with the least to go wrong. Make it out of the finest quality metals and throw in a few jewels in places that are likely to wear and you have a classic watch movement which can, and will, last a lifetime.

    As for the Tag, if it's an early one (and basically a Heur) this uses a very similar ETA movement to the Seamaster. If not then it still uses a similar movement but with some plastic parts. Ironically the second hand's precision that you are so pleased about is probably a sign that it is desperately in need of a service and so all of the lash in the cogs is taken up by pushing against excessive friction and this coincidentally looks just right!
    Last edited by M4tt; March 14th, 2011 at 21:54.
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  9. #9
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    Re: Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

    Quote Originally Posted by M4tt View Post
    The G-shock system is clearly a little less bright as it needs an independent system to tell it where it's hands are (either that or the stepper motors are extremely unreliable and need booting back into line.
    . .

    I'd expect as much from a tough dumb grunt. reliable as long as there's a boot waiting
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  10. #10
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    Re: Problems with my first omega seamaster 300m professional quartz

    Quote Originally Posted by Toothbras View Post
    Andy, I wouldn't worry about it too much. I also have a SMP quartz and the second hand doesn't quite hit the marks exactly. I got over it, hopefully you can too, this is a pretty common occurance, at least with the Seamaster owners I have talked to. I've wondered why, since it seems like something that should be spot on, but I've also check out other SMPs at jewelers, and most of those are a tad off mark too.
    +1

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