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  1. #1
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    How to get that mirror polish?

    One of my watches got a scratch on the side which was mirror polished. So after some reading, I got some Brasso to polish out the scratch. A big mistake! Brasso did get most of the scratch out but left a whirling mess of fine scratches, leaving what looks like a haze.

    I was going to try Cape Cod polishing cloth but read that the abrasive in Cape Cod was bad (or coarse) as Brasso. So I got a jeweler's polish cloth (with polish rouge embedded) which did make my watch shinier but didn't get rid of the fine scratches. What I have now is a shinier whirling mess of fine scratches.

    Please help! Any ideas and suggestions to get rid of fine scratches and restore the mirror polish would be appreciated. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Re: How to get that mirror polish?

    I have used the stainless steel polish from this company: Introduction To Buffing and Polishing - Caswell Inc. , but for polishing stainless steel flashlights and not a watch case. It worked very well for my purpose.
    They have a forum where you may find more info on the type of scratches you are trying to remove, and you can also try speaking with their customer service department.

    Hope this helps.

  3. #3
    Member Raoul Duke's Avatar
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    Re: How to get that mirror polish?

    i have found Cape Cod cloths to be quite good at removing hairline scratches but the chem is bad for gaskets and it's not recommended for watches. you need to be very careful where you use it.

    you could also try a Dremmel and some of their polishing wheels, but i'm not very familiar with them

  4. #4
    Member DocKlock's Avatar
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    Re: How to get that mirror polish?

    I'm sure a Dremmel or similar tool will work, but I'd be afraid of hitting the crystal or bezel. I'm thinking that you (or someone) should probably remove the 'guts' of the watch, leaving the case to polish. Just my 2 cents!!!!!!
    http://forums.watchuseek.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=64127&dateline=126305  8905
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  5. #5
    Member Bongo Boy's Avatar
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    Re: How to get that mirror polish?

    Don't worry too much about the scratches left by the Brasso--they'll come out. Even a Dremel with buffing wheel and compound won't remove even minor scratches out of stainless, in many cases. Naturally, this is a blanket statement and doesn't apply where your definition of 'scratch' isn't that same as mine. But, the general rule is you don't remove scratches, you remove the material adjacent to them until they are no longer the deepest thing in the area. :)

    It all completely depends on the scratch, of course. For marks such as those left by spring bar mishaps, etc., or other very minor scuffs, I usually start with 600 grit wetsand paper--a tiny little rolled-up tube 1/8" or so in diameter. This will remove fairly severe marks. Then, a medium to fine ScotchBrite pad, used with care, will remove marks from the 600 grit. The Dremel with buffing wheel and compound will then polish out what's left. I've got a few marks left in my Sumo from 400 grit paper that I didn't remove with 600 (or 600 marks I didn't remove with ScotchBrite, not sure), and the Dremel won't take them out.

    A couple of cautions when using a Dremel and wheel--after loading the wheel with compound you'll have too much compound on the wheel--I don't care how careful you are. The excess should be removed by buffing something other than the watch first until the compound stops coming off. Second, on almost any speed, the tool will put a LOT of heat into the work. You gots ta go slow.

    A good close-up photo of your watch would help if it's in sharp focus.

    On my Sumo below, although in the photo appears to be brushed, actually has a high polish on it. But, the scratches weren't removed. They're very, very fine--but the polish won't take 'em out. In the photo they look like the discrete, light lines. Again, you don't really polish out scratches--you bring the adjacent area down to the depth of the scratch, gaming things so you end up with no scratch as you end up on an abrasive that is fine enough to allow polishing. I didn't take the time remove all distinct marks from the previous operation, and that's what you're after. Each operation leaves a uniformly scratched surface--no single marks stands out on its own.






    There's a remarkable and noticeable difference between a highly-polished surface that still has scratches in it (no matter how fine they are) and a surface that was processed in step-wise fashion until it was ready to be polished. One is a surface that "looks real shiny", the other is a surface that truly looks like a mirror. When done right, the last step just before you polish makes you ask yourself, "Hmmm...do I really need to polish this?" That's when polishing actually works.

    Sorry for running on.
    Last edited by Bongo Boy; July 26th, 2011 at 22:12.

    It provides with the waterproof property that endures the subaqueous use for a long time
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  6. #6
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    Re: How to get that mirror polish?

    I use a felt polishing mop on a Dremel with Simichrome polish. It works like a charm on stainless steel. You need to be really careful not to let the mop get too dry or, even worse, too hot. It's amazing how quickly a watch case or a bracelet link gets hot and you can overdo it if you're not careful.

    I use ordinary masking tape to keep the mop away from brushed surfaces and crystals, including sapphire. If you're polishing a surface with a sharp edge between the mirror finish and a brushed finish, it's extremely easy to "break" the edge and you can never get it back, so at least until you get some experience, you may be better staying away from edges. And masking tape won't protect the edge. When you're using your Dremel, use low speeds and don't press too hard and your scratches and scuffs will be gone.

    I had some nasty scuffs on a highly polished surface and everything I tried seemed to make it worse until I landed on the Simichrome + Dremel formula. It won't get rid of deep scratches or gouges, of course, where metal has been removed or where it has "flowed", but scuffs, yes.

    Good luck!

  7. #7
    Member Bongo Boy's Avatar
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    Re: How to get that mirror polish?

    Quote Originally Posted by artec View Post
    It won't get rid of deep scratches or gouges, of course, where metal has been removed or where it has "flowed", but scuffs, yes.
    Artec brings up a good one: edges. Even polishing compounds have plenty of abrasive in them to make a real mess of sharp corners, and things like holes are a real problem. Polish will wipe out a hole in seconds--making it look like it's flowed under intense heat.

    Brasso has a surprising amount of abrasive in it. If you've ever been on board an older vessel with brass fittings, where hundreds of crews over decades have had the task of polishing the brass...you can often see cases where the fittings have actually had their contours rounded significantly over time.

    It provides with the waterproof property that endures the subaqueous use for a long time
    .
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  8. #8
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    Re: How to get that mirror polish?

    Well, I read that somebody used the "juice" from the Cape Cod on a Qtip to good effect in getting the mirror polish. I guess I must be doing something wrong. Is Qtip too rough? Should I use cloth? Or is the person who said Cape Cod was just as abrasive as Brasso right?

    Using Cape Cod juice also left fine scratches albeit finer than the ones Brasso left behind. I think the abrasive in the Cape Cod is finer than the one in Brasso. Is there another polish that's finer than Cape Cod?

    I don't have the skills nor confidence to use Dremel. Dremel makes me nervous. :)

  9. #9
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    Re: How to get that mirror polish?

    You could use the Simichrome polish on a microfiber cloth instead of on a Dremel felt mop. I agree that the power of the Dremel has the potential to damage your surface, but with a microfiber cloth and the paste polish I don't think you could ever do any damage. The Simichrome polish is, of course, a mild abrasive, but it's very mild indeed.... so mild in fact, that it's used on the paint on cars and motorcycles. I don't have an equivalent grit number but I assure you that it's really gentle stuff. In fact it may be too gentle and getting a scuff out may take so long you run out of patience!
    The advantage of using a microfiber cloth and the polish is that you can tell when the cloth is getting dry and it's very unlikely that you'll rub hard enough, fast enough or long enough to heat the watch up without noticing it, as you can with a Dremel.
    I know I sound as if I had stock in Simichrome..... I don't but I have successfully used it for exactly your purpose.

  10. #10
    Member justsellbrgs's Avatar
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    Re: How to get that mirror polish?

    mother's mag.......or cape cod cloth as previously mentioned...

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