Thread: seiko skx007 crown lock question

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  1. #11
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    Re: seiko skx007 crown lock question

    That's the reason why I always make sure that the crown on my SKX007 is screwed into the tube tightly. It's much better and a lot safer to have the SKX007 crown screwed tightly into the threaded tube rather than it being screwed in loosely and for it to accidentally get loose.[/QUOTE] That is one reason the SKX007 is so good & popular. The crown at 4 with case protection is designed just to minimize knocking by accident. Whereas the crown at 3 is prone to being knocked about. A bad position in my book.
    Vintage Fob Watches, Rolex Date Just,Omega - Constellation, Seamaster Seiko SKX007,SKX013,6309-836A,6119-6023,7002-7000,SNXF05

  2. #12
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    Re: seiko skx007 crown lock question

    Quote Originally Posted by ushills View Post
    You shouldn't need to screw the crown in too much. The crown is sealed with gaskets and the screw in element is basically to prevent turning our operation of the crown.

    Loosely finger tight is fine.
    Yeah, just like tightening the primary regulator valve to the SCUBA tank, that's it. The water pressure at 75 feet down shall do the rest in sealing the watch.

  3. #13
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    Re: seiko skx007 crown lock question

    Quote Originally Posted by rog0322 View Post
    Yeah, just like tightening the primary regulator valve to the SCUBA tank, that's it. The water pressure at 75 feet down shall do the rest in sealing the watch.
    Yes; I fear this is a case of 'over cautious fear'.
    The problem with tightening any screwed device too much is extreme wear and early failure of the threads.
    Cranking the screwing device down more than is really required just adds insult to injury.

    We see it all the time with vintage diver watches that have stripped threads. It isn't so much about cross threading or soft materials as about overzealous screwdowners

    Lighten up folks; the mechanical advantages of the inclined plane are such that little more than initial resistance is enough to properly seat a crown.

    Let's not needlessly kill any more diver watch cases with over aggressive tightening

  4. #14
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    Re: seiko skx007 crown lock question

    Quote Originally Posted by Pawl_Buster View Post
    Yes; I fear this is a case of 'over cautious fear'.
    The problem with tightening any screwed device too much is extreme wear and early failure of the threads.
    Cranking the screwing device down more than is really required just adds insult to injury.

    We see it all the time with vintage diver watches that have stripped threads. It isn't so much about cross threading or soft materials as about overzealous screwdowners

    Lighten up folks; the mechanical advantages of the inclined plane are such that little more than initial resistance is enough to properly seat a crown.

    Let's not needlessly kill any more diver watch cases with over aggressive tightening
    How can the tube threads wear or get stripped if the crown "stops" turning anymore when it's tightly screwed into the tube? From what I can tell, there's no more rotations that the crown can do after this particular "stopping point" on the tube once the crown is tightly screwed into the tube threads.

    I don't understand how you can wear the threads down or strip them if there's no further distance for the crown to rotate to and when there's no more threads on the tube thread for the crown to screw into? When the crown is tightly screwed "all the way" into the tube threads, the crown threads are just "meshing" properly all the way at the end of the tube threads where the tube threads "end". There are no more tube threads beyond this point on the tube for the crown to rotate into. The crown is just tightly screwed into the tube threads where they end. I wouldn't think that a tightly screwed in crown would harm the tube threads or the crown threads if the threads in BOTH the crown and on the tube are meshing correctly all the way up to the end of the tube threads.

    The only way that you can strip the threads is if you "cross thread" the crown threads into the tube threads. This scenario would cause the threads on the tube and on the crown to get "cut" and it would affect their "meshing" capabilities.
    Last edited by Tick Toc; March 1st, 2013 at 03:41.

  5. #15
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    Re: seiko skx007 crown lock question

    Quote Originally Posted by Tick Toc View Post
    How can the tube threads wear or get stripped if the crown "stops" turning anymore when it's tightly screwed into the tube? From what I can tell, there's no more rotations that the crown can do after this particular "stopping point" on the tube once the crown is tightly screwed into the tube threads.

    I don't understand how you can wear the threads down or strip them if there's no further distance for the crown to rotate to and when there's no more threads on the tube thread for the crown to screw into? When the crown is tightly screwed "all the way" into the tube threads, the crown threads are just "meshing" properly all the way at the end of the tube threads where the tube threads "end". There are no more tube threads beyond this point on the tube for the crown to rotate into. The crown is just tightly screwed into the tube threads where they end. I wouldn't think that a tightly screwed in crown would harm the tube threads or the crown threads if the threads in BOTH the crown and on the tube are meshing correctly all the way up to the end of the tube threads.

    The only way that you can strip the threads is if you "cross thread" the crown threads into the tube threads. This scenario would cause the threads on the tube and on the crown to get "cut" and it would affect their "meshing" capabilities.
    It's basic mechanics. Anyone who has worked on cars, motorcycles or anything else where torquing screws and bolts is concerned; knows what happens if these things are repeatedly over tightened.
    Tighten them up unnecessarily too often and the threads will fail...even if not cross threaded.

    Every time you tighten the crown more than it needs to be; you cause undue stress and wear on the threads; ie you are forcing bends and warps into the inclined plane
    Suffice it to say that tightening a crown to it's first resistance point is more than enough to meet the ISO rating of a dive watch vs cranking the crown to tortuous torque levels which just causes undue stress on the mechanism without adding any benefits to either WR or mechanical stability
    Last edited by Pawl_Buster; March 1st, 2013 at 04:14.

  6. #16
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    Re: seiko skx007 crown lock question

    Quote Originally Posted by Pawl_Buster View Post
    Every time you tighten the crown more than it needs to be; you cause undue stress and wear on the threads; ie you are forcing bends and warps into the inclined plane
    What's the "inclined plane"? Which part of the crown or tube is the inclined plane? Are you saying that the threads that are sticking upwards on both the tube and on the inside of the crown will bend sideways and/or warp if the crown is tightly screwed on the tube?

    ALSO, how many crown threading tightening times would it take for the threads in either or in both the tube and in the crown to get damaged and to have bends and warps in them? So far, I've screwed and unscrewed the crown on my brand new SKX007 about 5 or 6 times already on the first day that I received the watch in order to set the time, day and date and to adjust the minute hand correctly on the mark with the minute markers. I had to continuously keep unscrewing and then tightly screwing the crown back on into the tube a few times in order to adjust the minute hand correctly on its mark. Each time that I screwed the crown back on to the tube, I screwed it on tightly. I haven't unscrewed the crown since then, but I will unscrew it again tomorrow in order adjust the date on the watch to put it from February 28th to March 1st.

    Do you think that I damaged the threads by tightening the crown too much 5 or 6 times already?
    Last edited by Tick Toc; March 1st, 2013 at 05:15.

  7. #17
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    Re: seiko skx007 crown lock question

    The threads on the case tube and crown are inclined planes. In fact, all threads are. Think about it.

  8. #18
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    Re: seiko skx007 crown lock question

    Quote Originally Posted by Tick Toc View Post
    What's the "inclined plane"? Which part of the crown or tube is the inclined plane? Are you saying that the threads that are sticking upwards on both the tube and on the inside of the crown will bend sideways and/or warp if the crown is tightly screwed on the tube?

    ALSO, how many crown threading tightening times would it take for the threads in either or in both the tube and in the crown to get damaged and to have bends and warps in them? So far, I've screwed and unscrewed the crown on my brand new SKX007 about 5 or 6 times already on the first day that I received the watch in order to set the time, day and date and to adjust the minute hand correctly on the mark with the minute markers. I had to continuously keep unscrewing and then tightly screwing the crown back on into the tube a few times in order to adjust the minute hand correctly on its mark. Each time that I screwed the crown back on to the tube, I screwed it on tightly. I haven't unscrewed the crown since then, but I will unscrew it again tomorrow in order adjust the date on the watch to put it from February 28th to March 1st.

    Do you think that I damaged the threads by tightening the crown too much 5 or 6 times already?
    Don't worry; you probably haven't done any damage yet.
    In future; just screw the crown down until it stops then give it a light snug. That's all it needs and won't cause undue stress on the threads.

    The threads on a screw are just an inclined plane as selym points out.
    If you unwound the thread on a screw; it would look like a ramp or inclined planed

  9. #19
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    Re: seiko skx007 crown lock question

    I set the date to March 1st on my SKX007 this morning. I gently unscrewed the crown to set the date. The crown was screwed on the threaded tube very tight, so I was very gentle when I unscrewed it.

    After I finished setting the correct date, I gently screwed the crown back on to the threaded tube, but this time around, I didn't tighten it very tight. I very lightly finger tightened it until the crown stopped screwing on the tube and just gave it a small snug like recommended. So right now, the crown is lightly screwed on to the threaded tube.

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