Seiko 6138 Chronograph Reference Guide
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    Seiko 6138 Chronograph Reference Guide

    Seiko 6138 Chronograph
    Reference Guide


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    Table of Content

    Introduction
    History of Seiko Chronographs
    The 6138 Movement
    Overview Chart
    The Seiko 6138 Models
    Seiko - 6138-001x (Ufo)
    Seiko - 6138-002x (Tokei Zara)
    Seiko - 6138-003x (Kakume)
    Seiko - 6138-004x (Bullhead)
    Seiko - 6138-300x (Jumbo)
    Seiko - 6138-700x (Calculator)
    Seiko - 6138-800x (Baby Panda)
    Seiko - 6138-801x
    Seiko - 6138-802x (Panda)
    Seiko - 6138-803x
    Buying Guide – Used 6138 Models
    6138 Technical Guide
    Catalogue and Advertisement Pictures
    Seiko 6138 Picture Gallery



    Introduction
    I have been collecting Seiko 6138 Chronographs for more than a year now and have been fallen in love with them. There is a lot of information on the Web, but I was always missing a good and detailed summary on these great Seiko watches. I have collected a lot if inforamtion and added some own experience I made during the last year on collecting 6138 chronographs. Hopefully, you find this guide useful!

    History of Seiko Chronographs


    1964: With the long history of Japanese watch making, it is not surprising that Seiko was responsible for developing and producing Japan’s first chronograph watch. The story began with the 1964 Olympic Games in Tokyo, for which Seiko was the official timekeeper. Seiko provided more than 1,200 units of various types of stopwatches for the Olympic timers, and to commemorate the event, they also issued a commercial version of its wristwatch chronograph, which had a monopusher system. The Seiko Crown Chronograph had a stainless steel case, was 38.2 mm in diameter and 11.2 mm thick. It was water-resistant up to 30 meters. The movement was the 12-ligne, 21-jewel Caliber 5719.

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    1969: Before getting into detail on the 6138 movement, let’s have a look on the year 1969, a very important year for the watch industry, especially in relation to the chronograph watches.
    Automatic wristwatches were already well-known before 1969, but there was still no mass produced automatic chronograph movement on the market. In 1947, Lemania did make a small series of automatic chronographic movements, but they were never commercially produced or sold. Obviously, there were technical issues that could not be overcome at that time.
    The very first chronograph was actually made in the year 1862 and the first chronograph in wrist-watch format was available around 1910. The same year man flew to the moon, the first mechanical chronographs had been developed and released. After the first wrist watch chronograph in 1910, people had to wait for another 60 years before the first automatic chronographs could be purchased! The automatic chronograph is still regarded as one of the last great achievements of mechanical horology.
    Other than the race heading towards the moon, which was won by the United States, the race for the first automatic chronograph movement was much closer. Actually, three movements – all automatic chronographs - were released in 1969 to the public.
    First competitor was a consortium of Buren, Heuer, Breitling, Hamilton and Dubois Depraz, developing the Cal.11 which was first shown at the Basel fair in March ’69. The Cal. 11 was an automatic movement with a micro-rotor and with the chronograph module placed on top of a Buren automatic movement. The caliber was made under high pressure and a story says that the first available piece given to a reporter only worked for some hours before it broke. It took the consortium some more time and another version (Cal. 12) before the movement really worked reliable.
    Almost exactly at the same time Zenith/Movado came with the (still present, though revised a few times) famous El Primero. Today, Zenith still claims to be the first producer of an automatic chronograph, but it seems they have mainly just done a better job in marketing their El Primero. When both Heuer/Buren/Movado and Zenith were still deploying their Chronographs into mass production, the third competitor Seiko already had their first 6139 based watches for sale in May 1969. The main reason why Seiko never highlighted their innovative mechanical in marketing was probably the fact they were introducing the first Quartz watch in the same year, the Seiko Quartz Astron – a watch with a technology that would completely revolutionize the whole watch industry.

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    Seiko 6139-6002 with the first 6139 automatic chronograph movement

    Its successor, the 6138 came out a year later in 1970. While the Cal.11 and the El Primero were revised a few times, the 6138 remained unchanged until 1979, its last year of production.
    The 6138 featured an additional subdial for 12h time measurements and included hand winding. Even though the 6138 could be considered as the successor of the very first 6139 automatic chronograph, both calibers were built until 1979 when the quartz revolution took place not only at Seiko but in the whole watch industry, resulting in a new time period of watches.

    The 6138 Movement

    The SEIKO 6139 and 6138 series are the first fully integrated automatic chronograph in the world featuring column wheel and vertical coupling mechanism. With this movement, they have set the standard which was followed by the Swiss watch industries 20 years later. The same movement configuration was adopted by Rolex when it made its own in-house movement for Daytona in the year 2000, 30 years after SEIKO released the caliber 6139 and 6138.
    The 6138 was the successor of the 6139 automatic chronograph movement but produced in parallel until 1979. The 6138 was technically at least equal to his Swiss counterparts as it had a fully integrated chronograph. There were two versions of the 6138, the 6138A introduced in 1970 had 21 jewels. The 6138B was introduced a bit later with 23 jewels. Both feature a column wheel that regulates the chrono functions, and a vertical clutch mechanism for the engagement. It is still considered to be superior over the mechanically more simple Cam Actuated movements. The movement diameter measures 27,4mm and a height of 7,9mm. The "speed" is 21.600 a/H.
    The 6138A and B is a 2 register chronograph, counting up to 30 minutes on one subdial and another 12 hours on the second dial. The second-hand measures up to 1/6th of a second (21600 beats per hours/3600s).
    All 6138 movements feature a quick-set day/date indicator and they can be handwound, something that people often miss on most other Seiko 6139 automatic movements.
    Compared to Zenith’s El Primero, both the 6139 and 6138 have no separate second-hand which means with the chrono functions disabled there is nothing moving on the dial.
    Generally, the 6138 movements are considered as very reliable and need a minimum of service. I have seen many 6138 watches running within the Chronometer norm which is a notable fact for watches being 40 years old.

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    Not beautiful, but reliable!


    The 6138 Models in Detail

    Overview Chart
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    The Seiko 6138 Models
    There are 10 different 6138 models with some variations in color and material which results in a total of 18 variants, not counting the variants for local day indication, hand coloring and labeling. The models range in sizes from 40mm to 44mm in diameter. The individual designs nicely satisfy the different taste for sportive, elegant, small and large watches. All 6138 watches from Seiko are using the same automatic 6138A or 6138B movement with very similar operation.

    All 6138 chronographs are equipped with two main hands measuring hours and minutes. There is no hand indicating the seconds which means unless you run the chronograph, nothing will visually move on the dial. All 6138 watches have both automatic and hand winding, similar to the newer Valjoux 7750 movement. The chronograph counts seconds with a big hand, minutes on a smaller 30min subdial and hours on another 12h subdial. Starting and stopping the chronograph is usually very smooth on a well serviced watch and requires less power than on a ETA/Valjoux 7750 movement. Another useful function is the indication of day and date which can be quick set by pulling the crown to the first position, then rotating forward/backward to adjust the day/date. All 6138 model have two languages on the day dial, often English/Arabic but some local versions are also available (i.e. English/French, English/Spanish, English/German).


    Seiko - 6138-001x (Ufo)
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    The Seiko 6138-001x (Model numbers range from 6138-0010 thru 6138-0019) Chronograph is one of the early yet striking models of the 6138 line of chronographs. The round shape of the body let Seiko fans give this model the nickname “Ufo” whereas Seiko has also used the name “Yachtsman” which underlines the rather sportive look of the watch. With a water resistance of 70m, scratch resistant Hardlex Glass and the integrated two dial chronograph, the sportive look is supported by real use functions that help the user in daily activities.
    The watch is rather big (43mm diameter) and with a height of more than 14mm, it is large even for today’s standards. In the early 1970’s, when this watch was released, it must have been huge. The size of this Ufo surely explains the high demand this watch still gets in the used watch market. Remember that Chronographs in the 1950’s usually had a diameter of 34mm or 35mm and even in the 70’s and 80’s, typical sizes for sportive watches were mainly between 36mm and 40mm.
    Even though the Ufo is big in size, it looks great even on smaller wrists as it has a hidden wristband mount with no visible lugs and the length of 46mm is small enough to fit perfectly on both small and bigger wrists.
    The dials on the 6138-001x are all very similar, the subdials are always silver on a black main dial. As usual, Japanese versions can mostly be detected with the “5 Sports, Speedtimer” on the dial whereas export models are usually labeled with “Chronograph Automatic”. A nice feature on the minute/hour subdial is the yellow marking which indicates the first 30min of an hour.

    Overall, the 6138-001x is a watch with a very robust and reliable 6138 Seiko movement which is cool looking and still meeting practical requirements of today’s users. Since it was produced in high numbers, availability of used models is quite good and prices are still rather low compared to other 70’s chronographs from Heuer, Omega or Breitling. The original pricing in the beginning 70’s was around US $ 145 which was in a similar range of an Omega Speedmaster. So if you can get a decent model for $300-$400, you can surely consider this purchase as a real bargain!


    Seiko - 6138-002x (Tokei Zara)
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    The Seiko 6138-002x Chronograph is one of rarer versions of the 6138 chronographs and is not offered very often on the used watch market. It seems that less watches from this model were sold than from the more popular versions, such as the Jumbo or Ufo. The bowl shaped body was the reason why this model got the nickname “Tokei Zara”.
    The watch is smaller than the Ufo or Jumbo, but with a 40mm diameter, it is still perfectly wearable today. For the 70’s standard, even the smaller 40mm 6138 models are still considered large as typical sizes for sportive watches at that time were mainly between 36mm and 40mm.
    There are two dial versions from the 6138-002x, one with a grey and one with a blue minute subdial. Japanese versions can be detected with the “5 Sports, Speedtimer” on the dial whereas export models are usually labeled with “Chronograph Automatic”.

    Overall, the 6138-002x has the same robust and reliable 6138 Seiko movement still meets practical requirements of today’s users. Prices for used Tokei Zara models range between $200 and $300 which reflects a lower demand in the market. If you like the look of the 6138-002x, you can purchase a high quality automatic chronograph for really low rate!


    Seiko - 6138-003x (Kakume)
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    The Seiko 6138-003x Chronograph represents a very sportive model of the 6138 range and this watch is still in very high demand. The most specific feature are the square subdials why people call the watch “Kakume”, meaning “Square Eyes”. It has a water resistance of 70m, scratch resistant Hardlex glass and an integrated two dial chronograph. The sportive look is mainly present in the blue dial version, other than the alternative and less popular version with a champagne colored dial.
    The watch is a big piece of fine mechanics and measure 43mm in diameter. Length is about 44mm and with a height of more than 14mm, the Kakume is big even for today’s standards. A striking fact is the lug to lug widths of only 18mm which makes the use of leather or nato straps look a bit strange. The original metal bracelets are better fitting the watch since they compensate the small wristband connection with a broader first metal element.
    As mentioned above, there are two versions for the 6138-003x with a blue and a champagne colored dial. The blue versions are much more common and easier to find. As usual, Japanese versions can mostly be detected with the “5 Sports, Speedtimer” on the dial whereas export models are usually labeled with “Chronograph Automatic”.

    For sure, the 6138-003x is a great watch with a very robust and reliable 6138 Seiko movement. It is probably the most sportive looking one and meeting most functional requirements. It was produced in high numbers and availability of used models is quite good. Yet, finding really good and original pieces is not easy as these watches were worn for many years and usually not stored in a safe. Prices are still quite low compared to other 70’s chronographs but expect to pay at least $400 for a good and original model.


    Seiko - 6138-004x (Bullhead)
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    6138-004x or the Seiko Bullhead is possibly the crown in the line of 6138 models produced by Seiko between 1970 and 1979. Even though this version uses the same movement of the 6138 line, it is somehow special as it uses the “Bullhead” layout of the crown and chrono pushers which can be seen by other vendors in the 70’s such as Omega with its Vintage OMEGA Bullhead Chronograph. Big difference between the Omega and the Seiko – the Japanese bullhead is a very affordable and cool looking chronograph whereas the Omega easily reaches prices beyond $10.000!
    The case of Seiko’s Bullhead is wonderfully designed and has polished and matte parts. The diameter is roughly 43mm, length is 46mm and the thickness is up to 16mm at the top where the pushers are located. Originally , the bullhead comes with a metal fishbone bracelet but it looks nice with a rally leather strap as well.
    The two versions are very distinct and give a very different look and feel. The brown dialed version with a red tachymeter ring and golden colored subdials looks very retro and represents a typical 70’s style. The black version with a yellow second hand and blue subdials looks sportier and less retro. On a metal bracelet, it looks almost timeless and is less flashy than the brown version. Both models have reached a cult status among Seiko lovers and the bullhead often makes it to the top rated Seiko watches ever built. Considering the countless models that Seiko has produced, this is quite notable!
    The Bullhead is a great watch and almost a must have for every Seiko watch collector. It has the same very robust and reliable 6138 Seiko movement and is probably the coolest looking watch that Seiko has produced in the 70’s. It was produced in a relatively high number and availability of used models is quite good. On the other hand, demand especially for very good and original pieces is very high and prices have increased significantly over the last years. When you could get a good Bullhead for $200 to $300 in 2005, prices have more than doubled in the meantime. On the other side, used watch prices are still low compared to other 70’s chronographs and even damn cheap compared to an Omega Bullhead. If you can get a good model, you will surely own one of the coolest watches ever made by Seiko!


    Seiko - 6138-300x (Jumbo)
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    The 6138-300x chronograph – or “Jumbo” – is a very popular watch made by Seiko in the 70’s and due to its very big size (42mm diameter, 15mm thickness), it can be nicely worn even today. Even though the Bullhead and Ufo are even bigger in diameter, the Jumbo is the watch that seems to be the biggest of all, explaining the nickname quite well. The reason is the huge dial and a thin outer border which lets watches appear bigger as they actually are. The most “striking” feature of the 6138-300x is its very timeless and graphical design which still seems modern even after 40 years! It can be worn as a day-to-day watch and probably catches less attention than the Ufo or Bullhead chronographs. The Jumbo looks great with a metal bracelet or leather strap and was available with two matte dial versions – a black and a petrol blue one. Both look elegant but with good wrist presence due to its diameter and thickness. It comes with a flat glass which out spans the body with about 2mm and lets the watch look substantial. Original finish of the Jumbo was polished and matte at the sides and looks both elegant and sportive.
    The Jumbo was produced in high numbers and availability of used models is the best between all 6138 watches. Still, a very good Jumbo easily reaches $350 but more used pieces can easily be purchased for $200. If you look for a timeless piece of 70’s design, the Jumbo is the one you like to own!


    Seiko - 6138-700x (Calculator)
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    Another very rare model in the range of automatic chronographs is the 6138-7000 “Calculator”. It features a double external bezel, one fixed and one mobile to perform calculations and to set cursor position. Apart from the calculator function, the 6138-7000 features the same typical elements as all other 6138 chronographs. Among all 6138 models, it is the only one that originally was equipped with an acrylic glass. The calculator rings add some significant size to the watch, reaching 44mm in diameter, so this watch once more is a very big one, especially considering the age of this watch. There is only one black dial available with a red step second hand.
    The Calculator is rare and availability of good used models is quite low. The few models offered easily reach more than $500 but you surely get a very special Seiko watch with a unique feature – the calculator.


    Seiko - 6138-800x (Baby Panda)
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    The 6138-8000 is another very rare and hard to find mechanical chronograph which is called “Baby Panda” due to its similarity to the 6138-8020 “Panda” model. The two subdials are smaller and this lets the watch appear as the small sister of the Panda. Compared to the massive Kakume, Ufo or Bullhead versions, this model is a medium size (40mm diameter) piece with a beautiful and elegant dial design for both versions in ivory and dark grey.
    The Baby Panda is very rare and availability of good used models is almost zero. Even non working, totally used and worn pieces are offered for $300 which undermines the low availability of this nice model.


    Seiko - 6138-801x
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    Many Seiko 6138 fans consider this model the “holy grail” as it is extremely rare and yet beautiful. It was exclusively sold in Japan and features a dark blue dial in a nicely sized 42mm sportive stainless steel case. All watches sold have the “5 Sports, Speedtimer” layout on their dial as the watch was never designed for export outside Japan.
    The 6138-8000 is extremely rare and availability of used models is almost zero. If you can ever get a decent piece with a good dial, it is surely worth to get it fixed and reworked by a professional watchmaker.


    Seiko - 6138-802x (Panda)
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    Compared to the “Baby Panda” and the 6138-8010, the 6138-8020 or “Panda” is a quite common watch with a very similar dial layout as the Baby Panda. Many people consider this one the nicest and most elegant 6138 as the subdial sizes perfectly match the body size of 40mm in diameter. The name Panda is widely used for watches with a light dial color and dark subdials, looking like a panda bear. The 6138-8020 was available in two versions - one with a stainless steel silver body with an ivory colored dial and a golden version with a black dial.
    The golden version is both very rare but also in low demand. The Panda colored version is highly demanded and has been produced is quite big numbers. As usual, the original case finish was a mix between polished and matte surfaces.


    Seiko - 6138-803x
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    The last but not least model in the line of Seiko 6138 chronographs is another nickname less model with the number 6138-8030. It came in three versions with very different characters. The silver body and blue subdial version had the most sportiest design but due to its diameter of only 40mm, it is less present on your wrist like the Kakume with 43mm. The volcano shaped body has actually another down-size effect so that this model seems to be the smallest one of all 6138 versions. The two other variations use a lot of golden elements, one with a silver body and golden subdials, the other one with a golden body and golden subdials.
    Overall, the 6138-8030 has the same robust and reliable 6138 Seiko movement and as all variations, it still meets practical requirements of today’s users. Prices for used 8030 models range between $250 and $350, depending on the version and condition. If you like the look of the medium sized 6138-8030, a purchase can really be a great bargain!


    Buying Guide – Used 6138 Models

    The used watch market for Seiko 6138 is quite active and many different models are offered through various marketplaces such as ebay, chrono24 or several watch forums.
    Typically, the 6138 watches were used intensively which results in many highly worn chronographs offered in marketplaces. This is different from most Swiss luxury watches which were often stored in safes for many years of worn only on special occasions.
    A difference to Swiss luxury watches is also the high number of produced pieces. This results in a big number of offered 6138 chronographs with a relatively low price range compared to mechanical chronographs i.e. from Heuer or Omega.
    The downside is the weak condition of many 6138 pieces as they have been worn intensively and were rarely serviced well. The increasing price level of mechanical watches also influenced the Seiko 6138 chronographs which nearly double the prices in the last 5 years. This again caused many – mostly non professional – watchmakers to renovate old worn pieces and offer them for a premium price. Unfortunately, these watches are often polished inadequately and have often provided with non-original aftermarket parts. There are also blended watches offered which are built together from two different models with non-original dials and hands.
    If you want to seriously collect 6138 chronographs, stay away from totally worn or non professionally restored watches. Rather look for original well serviced models or those which have been professionally restored.
    The price level of all Seiko 6138 chronographs is increasing over the last years which reflect the high demand for these cool looking and reliable timepieces. Compared to Swiss vintage watches, the prices are still relatively low and range from $200 up to $800 for good to excellent pieces.
    Here are some practical tips you may want to know before purchasing a used 6138 watch:


    Bracelets

    • Original steel bracelets are hard to get and are usually quite worn and have a lot of stretch.
    • If you are not insisting on original straps, you can buy aftermarket bracelets on ebay. The quality is usually very similar to the original parts. Please be aware that the links between the band and the watch are different for the various models (i.e. a Kakume bracelet does not fit to a Bullhead). Separate link elements are available yet.
    • If you want an original band for the Bullhead, keep in mind the original standard bracelet is a folded steel fishbone style with a stamped steel folding clasp. It should also be noted that all Bullhead bracelets are asymmetrical from end to end. This means that the bracelet is wider where it attaches to the top of the case than it is where it attaches to the bottom. If the bracelet on a particular Bull is symmetrical, then it is not original.

    Bezel

    • Some of the 6138 models have bezels with a Tachymeter scale which tend to scratch easily. Some aftermarket bezels are available so be aware the bezel might not be original in case they seem very new. NOS bezels can be found (though no longer from Seiko), but can be expensive (+/- $70- $100).



    Body and Glass

    • The bodies (in original condition) are produced with a mix of matte-finished (satin) and highly polished surfaces. The creases along the sides of the case should be well defined (though not razor sharp) and tend to get rounded-off when cases are improperly refinished. In many cases, the matte parts have been polished which destroys the original finish.
    • The original Hardlex glass used in all models (except the Calculator) is often very much scratched. In many cases, the glass was replaced with either original or mostly aftermarket parts. An acrylic glass is easily detected; it will be harder to distinguish an aftermarket glass from the original one
      which should have beveled edge, be flat and should only protrude a very little bit (at most) beyond the top of the bezel. Examples offered on eBay often have after-market crystals which noticeably project (stick out) above the bezel or use a domed acrylic crystal with curved edges.


    Dial and Hand

    • The hour and minute hands are straight, only come in white and have lume in the middle; except in brown speedtimer bullheads, which have no lume on the hour/minute hands.
    • After 30 or 40 years of operation, the lume is usually no longer actively glowing. Some watchmakers can re-lume the hands which of course can be an expensive exercise.
    • You find many watches with aftermarket hands; check out pictures of original 6138 model in order to detect the correct hands that should be installed.
    • The sweep second chronometer hands should be yellow on the brown bullheads; yellow on the black; It should be maroon on the brown speedtimer models.


    Crown and Pushers

    • Pushers can be sticky or sometimes hard to press. If well services, the pushers should operate very smooth. All hands should set to zero instantly. In some cases, the chronographs second hand stops close before reaching the 60s position which is an indicator of a weak main spring or the fact that the movements needs revision.
    • Unlike many Seiko automatics, 6138‘s are hand windable, but the crowns are not lockable. Winding should be smooth on well serviced watches. Aftermarket replacement crowns and broken crown stems are found frequently in otherwise good looking watches.


    Movement

    • Pay particular attention to corrosion to the inside of the case and to the threads where the case-back screws in, which is common on these watches. You can even see rotors being stained by rust. With new seals a watch can be dust sealed, but probably not be made water-proof. Always insist on a picture from the movement before buying any vintage watch in order to avoid an expensive revision (>$150)




    General Tips

    1. Always buy the best example you can find, don’t go after the first one which could cost you a lot of extra money for restoration.
    2. Look for original Seikos and check for Hands, Bezel, Glass and Dials.
    3. Beware of over polished cases as they are no longer original
    4. Avoid watches that show signs of moist and rust. These watches can often not be repaired as many watch parts are no longer available



    6138 Technical Specifications

    Seiko 6138A
    Functions
    automatic chronograph, 60s, 30min, 12h pillar wheel
    day: quickset through crown, 2 languages
    date: quickset through crown

    Data
    12''', Dm= 27.0mm, Do= 27.4mm, H= 8.0mm, (dial spacer +0.2mm)
    21 jewels
    f = 21600 A/h
    power reserve 45h

    Balance staff Seiko 315611

    Stem Seiko 354616

    Mainspring / battery
    Seiko 401616

    Hands
    1.50 x 0.90 x 0.26 / 0.26 x 0.26mm

    Seiko 6138B
    (modified switching mechanism)

    Features
    automatic chronograph, 60s, 30min, 12h pillar wheel
    day: quickset through crown, 2 languages
    date: quickset through crown

    Data
    12''', Dm= 27.0mm, Do= 27.4mm, H= 8.0mm, (dial spacer +0.2mm)
    21/23 jewels
    f = 21600 A/h
    power-reserve 45h

    Balance staff Seiko 315611

    Stem Seiko 354616

    Mainspring / battery
    Seiko 401616

    Hands
    1.50 x 0.90 x 0.26 / 0.26 x 0.26mm


    Catalogue and Advertisement Pictures

    Here, you can find some old catalogue and advertisement pictures from the 70's.

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    Seiko 6138 Picture Gallery

    6138-8020 „Panda“
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    6138-0040 „Bullhead“
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    6138-3002 „Jumbo“
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    6138-0010 „Ufo“
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    6138-0030 „Kakume“
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    6138-8030
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    Best regards and a lot of pleasure with your Seiko 6138 watches!
    freemind1
    Last edited by freemind1; February 27th, 2015 at 15:57.

  2. #2
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    Re: Seiko 6138 Chronograph Reference Guide

    Wow, that is a great overview, thank you so much! I have several 6138's, really love them.

  3. #3
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    Re: Seiko 6138 Chronograph Reference Guide

    Very nice review of 6138 series, many thanks for sharing with us. I want to buy a 6138-0011 and just came about this.

  4. #4
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    Thanks so much for this - what a great reference!

    Is it correct that the 6138 handwinds but the 6139 does not?

  5. #5
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    Re: Seiko 6138 Chronograph Reference Guide

    Quote Originally Posted by rhys-aus View Post
    Thanks so much for this - what a great reference!

    Is it correct that the 6138 handwinds but the 6139 does not?
    Seiko Fans:
    You may find this recent review in Worn & Wound interesting. I believe the author states the 6138 is windable and hackable.

    http://wornandwound.com/2015/11/02/a...8-0030-kakume/
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    Seamaster Planet Ocean 2500 42mm; Seamaster Vintage cal 562; Ebel 1911 El Primero; Gycine SubCombat; Seiko Pogue yellow 6139-6002; Seiko Monster SRP; Jacques Lemans V7750; Vintage Jules Jurgensen automatic; Vintage Sicura Diver winder; Vintage Landeron Chronograph winder; Nomos/Stowa Homage ST25; Sangdo AT Homage day/date

  6. #6
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    Re: Seiko 6138 Chronograph Reference Guide

    I just came across this review, great information.

    The reason I came across it is because just this last Saturday I purchased a hardly worn Bullhead at a local auction and I'm having trouble with the bracelet. I'd appreciate your comments.

    On one end of the bracelet, where it attached to the buckle, the bracelet has an additional piece that slides in and out, but I can't seem to make it stay in place. When the piece is all the way in the fit on the wrist is snug and very good, but without warning when there is the tiniest amount of pressure it slides out and the fit becomes loose. The pin adjustment is already at the smallest.

    The sliding piece seems to have some sort of spring mechanism that might be broken or not working properly (and that might explain the hardly used condition). I have removed that piece and put the pins at the largest setting and I can wear the watch, but it's not the ideal solution.

    Below are a few lousy pictures of the watch and the bracelet and buckle, any help will be appreciated

    Henry
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  7. #7
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    Re: Seiko 6138 Chronograph Reference Guide

    This post is insane. Thank you so much. I really really want a 8020 (hard and expensive now :/) or a 3002 (maybe a bit oversize for my 6.5 wrist :/, 48mm lug to lug is the limit.)
    Last edited by Thib1903; June 16th, 2016 at 14:19.

  8. #8
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    Re: Seiko 6138 Chronograph Reference Guide

    Quote Originally Posted by hdavis View Post
    I just came across this review, great information.

    The reason I came across it is because just this last Saturday I purchased a hardly worn Bullhead at a local auction and I'm having trouble with the bracelet. I'd appreciate your comments.

    On one end of the bracelet, where it attached to the buckle, the bracelet has an additional piece that slides in and out, but I can't seem to make it stay in place. When the piece is all the way in the fit on the wrist is snug and very good, but without warning when there is the tiniest amount of pressure it slides out and the fit becomes loose. The pin adjustment is already at the smallest.

    The sliding piece seems to have some sort of spring mechanism that might be broken or not working properly (and that might explain the hardly used condition). I have removed that piece and put the pins at the largest setting and I can wear the watch, but it's not the ideal solution.

    Below are a few lousy pictures of the watch and the bracelet and buckle, any help will be appreciated

    Henry

    To be honest...invest in a new bracelet, the installed one is not original anyway!

  9. #9
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    Re: Seiko 6138 Chronograph Reference Guide

    I've just bought a 6138 8030 gold plated. Could someone explain to me what is the difference with the 8039 JPS. I really cannot see any visual differences. Thank you very much.

  10. #10
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    Re: Seiko 6138 Chronograph Reference Guide

    Hello everyone - I am new here
    I have a 6138 8020 which I bought new
    I am restoring it and I need a new dial
    Where can I get the best/most original dial from?
    Thank you all for any advice

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