Thread: DIY Guide: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals...

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  1. #1
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    DIY Guide: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals...

    Hi all,

    I'm new here and it's a pleasure to share a little work I've do. Sorry for my poor english, it's not my mother language! That post was kindly rewriting by Isthmus (Gabriel) for an easier understanding. Hope it will be useful!

    Quote Originally Posted by alemmar View Post

    DIY: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals.


    The following article is intended to instruct you on how to go about changing your own watch crystals on base model SKX divers (7s26-0020/9), on 7002 divers, and on a Sumo.

    Parts Needed (Purchased from Jules Borel & Co.) for both SKX and 7002 divers:

    - Généric crystals
    - Crystal gaskets
    - Caseback gaskets
    - Crown gaskets

    First, lets start with my SKX007J, which has a scratched Hardlex. Let's go replace the crystal with a new Hardlex.

    - Start by removing the strap from the case (sorry, no pics),

    - Put pieces of over the caseback notches so as to protect the case while opening it (masking tape works great for this):





    - I usually put the watch case in a case vise. In this manner the case is protected from accidental scratching and is more easy to open using your caseback opening tool:





    - Unscrew until the caseback is loose and then finish unscrewing it either with your fingers or a pin of wood:





    - Your caseback should no be opened!





    - No you’ll need to remove the caseback gasket:





    - You will now need to remove the stem and crown. First unscrew the crown; then push the little lever on the plate and pull the crown all the way out. If you did it right, the crown and stem should pull out as a single unit without much resistance. WARNING: when pressing the release lever, do so gently and not all the way down. If you press to hard you will release the movement’s keyless works and you will not be able to set the stem back in:





    - No it’s time to remove the movement: By now you have removed everything that kept the movement in place, so it should go out easily. With a pin tool, simply lift the movement out of the case - consider blowing a little bit too to avoid dust getting into the works!








    - With the movement out of the case, place the movement into a movement holder and under a dust-cover:








    - With the movement safely tucked away, it is no time to remove the bezel. Your best tool will be a “good-ole” Swiss-Army knife! Just put the edge of the blade between the bezel and the case and twist. The bezel should pop right off.








    - You are now ready to begin removing the crystal. First you’ll need to choose the correct press die to remove the old glass. Be careful to select the correct size die (you’ll see in a minute why):








    -Now that your watch is in the press, press the crystal out gently and carefully. Why do you ask? Well because if you do as recommended, you just might avoid problems such as a broken chapter ring!





    Why did the chapter ring break? Because we need to use small dies. This one was too large. With a smaller die there will be no problem.

    You have no removed your old crystal and your old gasket and it is time to install the new replacements.








    - Set the gasket into the case and set the crystal over it. With the press, press the crystal onto the gasket. Be careful though, in order for the crystal to fit perfectly, it should be fitted perfectly horizontal before being pressed in:





    - Your new crystal has now been installed. To put the watch back together, wipe the interior of the crystal clean (until it is smudge free); blow the inside of the case to remove any debris; replace the movement back into the case (make sure to align the stem recess with the crown tube (if the alignment isn’t 100% perfect don’t worry, once you fit the stem back in place the movement will line itself up); Insert the stem and crown (If you didn’t release the keyless works, the stem should click and lock back into place);place the caseback gasket into it’s seat and apply a minute amount of silicone lube; and screw the caseback back in place (WARNING – do not over tighten the caseback or you will deform the gasket and compromise water resistance).











    NOW: Lets do the same job to a 7002-700j

    The challenge: changing glass, crown-gasket and caseback-gasket:

    The general instructions are essentially the same as above. This time, however, I chose the proper dies and managed to save my chapter ring. All success!

    First, follow the instructions above to remove the old crystal, crystal-gasket and the chapter ring:





    The case is cleaned:





    New Hardlex properly fitted!





    Stem and gaskets (old and new):





    All is now in the right place. Follow instructions above for installing the caseback gasket and closing the caseback…





    “et voila!”








    Third: Installing a sapphire on a Sumo:

    Keep in mind that you will need to source the sapphire crystal from an outside source, since they are not carried by the major supply houses. Ask the forum for sourcing recommendations.

    Once again, you will need to follow the written instructions above.





    Bye-bye Hardlex!





    The new sapphire crystal:











    Remontage, et voilà !








    Thanks for watching guys. I hope this will be of help in the future.
    Last edited by Isthmus; August 8th, 2008 at 20:37.

  2. #2
    Inactive Isthmus's Avatar
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    Re: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals

    Awesome. Thanks for posting Fred. Boy It's been a productive day. I'd like to thank Fred (aka Alemmar) for taking the time to put this together and for the instructive photographs. For those who don't know Fred is not a native English speaker, so I did my best at editing to make the article easily understood. I took some liberties by adding extra explanations where I thought they were necessary. Hopefully I didn't change the tone of the original article too much. If there is anything missing, please let Fred or me know and we'll be happy to edit the article further.

  3. #3
    Member Fatpants's Avatar
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    Re: DIY Guide: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals...

    Fantastic post, thanks for taking the time to put this together Fred, excellent work
    If you're in Hell what can I say? You probably deserved it anyway

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  4. #4
    Dive Watches Mod & MaL OnTimeGabe's Avatar
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    Re: DIY Guide: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals...

    Great job, Fred! You can never have too many pictures in a tutorial. I thought it was very easy to follow with no detail left out.
    Regards,

    Gabe

  5. #5
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    Re: DIY Guide: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals...

    Thanks! Isthmus did a really good rewriting and adds job! I'm happy to share my "experiment"..;)!

  6. #6
    Inactive Isthmus's Avatar
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    Re: DIY Guide: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals...

    Robbie was kind enough to add some additional information regarding specific parts numbers for some of the more popular models. Check it out:

    Quote Originally Posted by robbie409 View Post
    To add to this nice reading material

    skx007 (7s26-0020) and all those cousins (skx007, skxa53, skxa55):
    Bezel gasket: 0G345BA11
    crystal: 315P15HN02

    Monster
    Bezel gasket: 0G330BA11
    crystal: 300PX6HN03

    SUMO
    Bezel gasket: 0G340BA11 (YES!!, skx007 has a bigger bezel!!)
    crystal: 310P57HN03 (0,5mm smaller than skx007)

    Sammi steel
    Bezel gasket: 0G340BA11
    crystal: 310P49HN03 (I won't be surprised is crystal and bezel of Sumo and Sammi are interchangeable)

    Sammi ti:
    Bezel gasket: 0G340BA11
    crystal: 310P49HN03
    Both the same as the steel sammi...

    Atlas:
    Bezel gasket: 0G350BA11
    crystal: 310PA1LN03

    BigBoss:
    crystal: 290PB0HN02 (smallest diver)

  7. #7
    Member shandy's Avatar
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    Re: DIY Guide: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals...

    Wow! This has been a great day for really informative threads, I hope they are all going to be stickies! Thanks to all those involved for all the hard work and commitment to helping us all here with valuable information!

    All the best,
    Ian.

  8. #8
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    Re: DIY Guide: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals...

    we should put this as a sticky or in a DIY section

  9. #9
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    Re: DIY Guide: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals...

    Great job everyone, especially Alemmar, tres bien!
    Gabe, as WUSs in-house polyglot you deserve yet another gold star!
    And Robbie409, thanks for the inventory list.

    Thanks you guys,

    Rice
    Last edited by Ricehead; August 9th, 2008 at 15:19. Reason: I'm an idiot?
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  10. #10
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    Re: DIY Guide: How to Change Your Own Watch Crystals...

    Very cool!
    *Nick*
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor souls who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat " - Theodore Roosevelt
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