Oiling Seiko Travel Clock

Thread: Oiling Seiko Travel Clock

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  1. #1
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    Oiling Seiko Travel Clock

    I bought a 1960's-1970's Seiko travel clock from eBay and while it runs and keeps excellent time, I've been reading up on maintaining old mechanical clocks and am under the impression that dried up oil can eventually ruin the clocks' movement. I realise this clock isn't worth much, but should I get some clock oil and oil it up, or keep it as it is, since it still runs great? If I were to oil it up, where would I drop the oil through? I'd rather oil it myself as it isn't really worth taking to a clock repairers/jewellers.

    I know absolutely nothing about mechanical clocks so any help is appreciated.

    Pictures:

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/5339497/Othe...0%28HDR%29.jpg
    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/5339497/Othe...0%28HDR%29.jpg

  2. #2
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    Re: Oiling Seiko Travel Clock

    You would have to remove all the little knobs in the back (winder etc) then remove the little screws in the back, pop it off and
    you will notice multiple oil sinks on the surface of the clock plate. Oil sinks are located where the ends of the steel arbor meet the clock plate. Please refer to the picture showing an oil sink. Add one small drop of the proper oil to each sink, careful not to add too much as it will run down your movement. The tiny drop will be enough as surface tension will hold on to the oil and slowly distribute it as the clock runs. Do the same for all oil sinks and then put your clock back together. The knobs in the back should either screw off or pop off. You might not have to take off one or two as there might be an opening big enough in the back cover for it to just pass through, I cant really tell from the pic but Im sure you can figure it out. Here is a drawing of the oil sink example. Nice clock, have fun!

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  3. #3
    Member John MS's Avatar
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    Re: Oiling Seiko Travel Clock

    That takes care of the pivots. However the mainspring should also be oiled as well as the escapement some of which may be jeweled. Disassembly and cleaning would be a very good idea too.

  4. #4
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    Re: Oiling Seiko Travel Clock

    Most of the knobs just screw off, but I cannot get the time set knob off. I even tried pulling it off. I want to peek inside, to see what I'm up against.

    Would the Moebus 8030 Natural Clock Oil halfway down this page be any good?

    What would be involved in disassembly and cleaning?

  5. #5
    Member John MS's Avatar
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    Re: Oiling Seiko Travel Clock

    Quote Originally Posted by dave2889 View Post
    Most of the knobs just screw off, but I cannot get the time set knob off. I even tried pulling it off. I want to peek inside, to see what I'm up against.

    Would the Moebus 8030 Natural Clock Oil halfway down this page be any good?

    What would be involved in disassembly and cleaning?
    Hi. The time setting knob is usually a press fit. Try pulling up with two small screwdrivers under the lower edge of the knob. You will want a fairly light oil for the balance wheel, lever and escape wheel. Use generic clock oil for the rest of the movement. In addition to the oil you will need an oil dip or very very small screwdriver to apply it in very small quantities. If you overfill the sinks oil will dribble down the movement plates and pull all the oil out.

    You will need to remove the minute hand by pulling up with a hand removing tool or a screwdriver. Next release the dial which should be held in by set screws near the feet and remove the dial. Before disassembling the movement make a sketch of where all the parts go. First thing is to let the mainspring down by using the winding ket to hold the spring with one hand and releasing the winding click with the other. Sounds harder that it is after a bit of practice. If it is in a barrel the barrel will contain the spring, but you will need a mainspring winder to re-insert it into the barrel. If it is an open spring then contained it with a mainspring clip before letting it down. Next release the hairspring before loosening the plates. That's a fairly generic description that will have to be modified a bit depending on how the movement is actually put together.

    Once apart you should clean all parts in movement cleaning solution followed by a rinse solution.

    There are a lot of little steps, but there are two really important ones that have to be followed to avoid damage to the movement. 1. Let the mainspring power down before disassembling anything otherwise parts could fly everywhere and possibly get broken in the process. 2. Release the hairspring before disassembly and be very careful around that tiny bit of coiled steel. One wrong move and you could have a birds nest instead of a symmetric spring.

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