new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

Thread: new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

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  1. #1
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    Question new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

    The Worldtimer I ordered arrived last night. I did not realize it didn't have a screw down crown, so I'm embarrassed to write I mistakenly turned it anti-clockwise to try to unscrew it. This caused the city disk to move, which I thought was only supposed to happen when the crown was pulled out one stop. Turning the crown clockwise was also a new experience because the winding resistance was a lot higher than my other watches (a Ball watch, a Vostok automatic, and a Vostok manual wind). Should I be concerned with this, or is this just how this movement is supposed to feel? I noticed the instructions specified 15 winds while the instructions for some other watches is 40 winds, so maybe it's just geared differently?

    Besides that I managed to set the watch and it's keeping good time.

  2. #2
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    Re: new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

    I made that mistake with mine first time out. No big deal. I have the watch close to a year now and it is works very well in spite of it's dumb owner! ;)
    Tudor Black Bay
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    some others

  3. #3
    Member BrentYYC's Avatar
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    Re: new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

    It does feel stiff to wind, but that's a function of having a new, tight, stem gasket. It will loosen a bit over time if you're in the habit of hand winding it regularly.

    Perhaps the crown wasn't pressed all the way in, because the city disk shouldn't move. If it is, indeed, rotating when it's pressed all the way in, then it's defective.

    The number of winds they suggest is enough to get it going with a reasonable, but not a full, charge.
    Last edited by BrentYYC; August 13th, 2014 at 01:25.

  4. #4
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    Re: new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

    Quote Originally Posted by BrentYYC View Post
    Perhaps the crown wasn't pressed all the way in, because the city disk shouldn't move. If it is, indeed, rotating when it's pressed all the way in, then it's defective.
    Darn.... I just confirmed that on my copy, with the crown pressed in as far as I can get it, turning the crown the wrong way does indeed cause the city disk to move. I'm afraid to do it unnecessarily.

    If this is the watch's only defect I'd rather live with it than go through a lot of hassle getting it fixed.

  5. #5
    Member ksawyer06's Avatar
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    Re: new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

    Had the same issue, I sent it into be fixed on march 20th, and i am currently still waiting. According to Frederique Constant I should be receiving it soon. I understand the "Hassle Part".

  6. #6
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    Re: new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

    Sorry to revive an old thread, but it never got answered and I have the answer. The in-house movement by Frederique Constant only requires less than 20 winds, (12 or something like that) I have a power reserve indicator to prove that, therefore the force should be 3 times more than a regular movement that needs 40 winds, which is why there is so much resistance.

  7. #7
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    Re: new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

    Sorry to keep a revival going, but I had a quick question -- I've had a Worldtimer for about a year and a half, and wear it 1-2 times every week to ten days as part of a rotation; I've been winding 40 times each time I do so, because that's what I'm used to with my other pieces. I only just saw this thread now and found out about the 15-wind standard for FC in-house movements.

    In short, is there a danger that I've done damage to the movement or otherwise damaged the watch? Hoping not and that someone can shed some light on this -- thanks!

  8. #8
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    Re: new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

    If it's the in-house movement you're met with a 'stop' when it is fully wound. If it's not an in-house movement 40 winds is enough.
    Last edited by PineappleG; 1 Day Ago at 20:42.

  9. #9
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    Re: new Worldtimer: high winding resistance is normal?

    Hmmm -- that's certainly interesting -- my understanding is that the Worldtimer is an in-house movement, but I've definitely been able to wind it up to 40 times.

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