Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools - Page 10
Like Tree69Likes

Thread: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

Page 10 of 11 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 LastLast
Results 91 to 100 of 103
  1. #91
    Member pithy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    6,813

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by prasitw View Post
    I'd like to recommend the LED magnifiers because sometime your head will obscured the light from the light source in your work table.
    How are they for hairspring pinning and impulse jewel setting?
    Follow the Tour. Hidden Content Hidden Content

  2. #92
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    14
    On the right box of magnifier glasses. Lens can change 10X, 15X, 20X, and 25X. All of lens include this magnifier set. I think this magnifiers are much more useful enough for watchmaking. So cheap price and conveniently, easy to switch magnify of lens.

  3. #93
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    14

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    These are my tweezers set RTB brand and them made in swiss, high quality steel, non magnetic and anti-acid. This brand come from watchmaking tool shop which order swiss factory to made them with high precision and quality. The price per each about 16-18$. The picture show the end of tweezers. The watchmaking tool shop was Bergeon, Horotec, and AF distributor in my country.
    Name:  tweezer00.JPG
Views: 87
Size:  46.5 KB
    Name:  tweezer01.JPG
Views: 88
Size:  53.4 KB
    Name:  tweezer02.JPG
Views: 86
Size:  74.7 KB
    Name:  tweezer03.JPG
Views: 88
Size:  40.5 KB
    Last edited by prasitw; 4 Weeks Ago at 18:48.
    pithy likes this.

  4. #94
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    207

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    I've had a look through this thread: all I want is basic and usable tools for managing bracelets and battery changes in quartz watches. I understand the cheap Chinese tools on eBay are to be avoided, but then I don't want to spend a fortune on the very best professional tools - I would be, after all, just an occasional hobbyist. Surely there's a middle ground - of reasonable tools which are neither dirt cheap nor hideously expensive. I know that Esslinger do a couple of kits, but whether they are any better than the eBay Chinese ones I don't know. Advice...?

  5. #95
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    14

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by AussieGuy View Post
    I've had a look through this thread: all I want is basic and usable tools for managing bracelets and battery changes in quartz watches. I understand the cheap Chinese tools on eBay are to be avoided, but then I don't want to spend a fortune on the very best professional tools - I would be, after all, just an occasional hobbyist. Surely there's a middle ground - of reasonable tools which are neither dirt cheap nor hideously expensive. I know that Esslinger do a couple of kits, but whether they are any better than the eBay Chinese ones I don't know. Advice...?
    In my opinion the basic and usable tools for managing bracelets and battery changes in quartz watches, The cheap china tools can use for you because it is not necessary to use high quality tools for managing bracelets or battery changes. The high pricision and quality tools such as screwdriver and tweezers should be used for the movement avoid the chinese or india tools.
    Name:  01.JPG
Views: 79
Size:  69.3 KB
    These are tools for open and press back cover case. I used AF screwdriver and AF knife for open back cover so, I used chinese tool for close the back cover. I think plastic block are better than aluminium block because it soft than the watch case then it cannot make scars on your watch when you press the back cover. Plastic tweezer for remove and replace battery from china.
    Name:  02.JPG
Views: 79
Size:  51.3 KB
    These are tools for remove thread back case. The wood block holder and case opener are made in china.
    Name:  03.JPG
Views: 78
Size:  67.9 KB
    These are tools for managing bracelets or change strap. The spring bar remover can use bergeon or china, up to your money. The other tools are made in china.
    Last edited by prasitw; 4 Weeks Ago at 17:37.

  6. #96
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    207

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by prasitw View Post
    In my opinion the basic and usable tools for managing bracelets and battery changes in quartz watches, The cheap china tools can use for you because it is not necessary to use high quality tools for managing bracelets or battery changes. The high pricision and quality tools such as screwdriver and tweezers should be used for the movement avoid the chinese or india tools.
    Name:  01.JPG
Views: 79
Size:  69.3 KB
    These are tools for open and press back cover case. I used AF screwdriver and AF knife for open back cover so, I used chinese tool for close the back cover. I think plastic block are better than aluminium block because it soft than the watch case then it cannot make scars on your watch when you press the back cover. Plastic tweezer for remove and replace battery from china.
    Name:  02.JPG
Views: 79
Size:  51.3 KB
    These are tools for remove thread back case. The wood block holder and case opener are made in china.
    Name:  03.JPG
Views: 78
Size:  67.9 KB
    These are tools for managing bracelets or change strap. The spring bar remover can use bergeon or china, up to your money. The other tools are made in china.
    Thank you for your excellent advice!

    -A.

    Sent from my m8 using Tapatalk
    bvc2005 likes this.

  7. #97
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Paradise
    Posts
    695

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by AussieGuy View Post
    I've had a look through this thread: all I want is basic and usable tools for managing bracelets and battery changes in quartz watches. I understand the cheap Chinese tools on eBay are to be avoided, but then I don't want to spend a fortune on the very best professional tools - I would be, after all, just an occasional hobbyist. Surely there's a middle ground - of reasonable tools which are neither dirt cheap nor hideously expensive. I know that Esslinger do a couple of kits, but whether they are any better than the eBay Chinese ones I don't know. Advice...?
    Mate, go to the Lebanda site, look up tools or what ever else you are looking for.

    They are based in Brisbane and have three watchmakers on site.

    They supply good affordable items as well top of the line. I have bought all my gear from them . Usually I ask for eg. "Good cheap whatever" and I have never had an issue.
    Labanda - Watch Spare Parts

  8. #98
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    252

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by AussieGuy View Post
    I've had a look through this thread: all I want is basic and usable tools for managing bracelets and battery changes in quartz watches. I understand the cheap Chinese tools on eBay are to be avoided, but then I don't want to spend a fortune on the very best professional tools - I would be, after all, just an occasional hobbyist. Surely there's a middle ground - of reasonable tools which are neither dirt cheap nor hideously expensive. I know that Esslinger do a couple of kits, but whether they are any better than the eBay Chinese ones I don't know. Advice...?
    I completely disagree with the other poster about it being okay to use cheap tools for strap changes. If you get Chinese screwdrivers and Chinese pin pushers, the tips will break or even fall out. Then they will be useless or hard to use. The screwdrivers won't fit the screws nicely and you'll damage the screw head or your bracelet.

    If you get a cheap case holder it will have rough edges which will scratch.

    The cheap spring bar tool will break as well.

    I've had the Chinese tools. I suggest you only buy the swiss ones.

    Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk
    pithy likes this.

  9. #99
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    59

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by AaronMckay View Post
    I completely disagree with the other poster about it being okay to use cheap tools for strap changes. If you get Chinese screwdrivers and Chinese pin pushers, the tips will break or even fall out. Then they will be useless or hard to use. The screwdrivers won't fit the screws nicely and you'll damage the screw head or your bracelet.

    If you get a cheap case holder it will have rough edges which will scratch.

    The cheap spring bar tool will break as well.

    I've had the Chinese tools. I suggest you only buy the swiss ones.

    Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk
    They will learn the hard way


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #100
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    207

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Molliedooker View Post
    Mate, go to the Lebanda site, look up tools or what ever else you are looking for.

    They are based in Brisbane and have three watchmakers on site.

    They supply good affordable items as well top of the line. I have bought all my gear from them . Usually I ask for eg. "Good cheap whatever" and I have never had an issue.
    Labanda - Watch Spare Parts
    Thank you! I've looked at their catalogue, and they offer a small watch repair kit in a nice box. Is this good quality, or is it a repackaged Chinese kit?

    Sent from my m8 using Tapatalk

Page 10 of 11 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •