Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools - Page 6
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  1. #51
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    It's funny, when I googled this model number most of the sites that came up don't mention anything about who makes the set. Otto has this set listed under their french made screwdrivers. Star Time also says it's french made but on the photo they show the set is labeled A&F. Very confusing. Seems like the Burgeon swiss made 5-piece set from DRS is the best deal.

  2. #52
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by vbomega View Post
    It's a good set if you only plan on working with wristwatch movements. For pocket watches you will need 1.60, and very rarely 2.0.
    It's a bit pricey for a 6-piece set. Check Otto Frei. Do you really need wooden case? Go to Otto Frei and search for SCR-980.00
    If you work on larger movemewnts, some found in wrist watches, you will need larger sizes frequently (to do the job properly anyway).

    For example, here is a Panerai I have in the shop right now where someone certainly did not use the right sized driver on the crown wheel screw - you can clearly see that the driver was too narrow and thin for the slot, and the damage is evident at the red arrow locations:



    Not to mention the hack job on the plate around the setting lever screw...OY!

    So here is why you need drivers up to 3 mm - I use this one frequently on ETA 649X movements, and it fits the slot perfectly:



    I know this is a "getting started" thread and budgets are usually not large, but if you start out with good habits it will carry through in your work and as you progress. It amazes me how lazy some people are about simply putting down one driver, and picking up another of the right size. I see it all the time, and yes from some work done in service centers unfortunately. This watch has a display back as well, so when mistakes like this happen, they are quite visible.

    PS - Bergeon are "okay" drivers, but not the best by far IMO anyway. I don't currently own any - I sold them off when I bought a better set.

    Cheers, Al

  3. #53
    Member pithy's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Have you driven over to Cas-Ker and tried any of them?
    Follow the Tour. Hidden Content Hidden Content

  4. #54
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Archer View Post
    I know this is a "getting started" thread and budgets are usually not large, but if you start out with good habits it will carry through in your work and as you progress. It amazes me how lazy some people are about simply putting down one driver, and picking up another of the right size. I see it all the time, and yes from some work done in service centers unfortunately. This watch has a display back as well, so when mistakes like this happen, they are quite visible.

    PS - Bergeon are "okay" drivers, but not the best by far IMO anyway. I don't currently own any - I sold them off when I bought a better set.

    Cheers, Al
    I agree. Whenever I initially cut corners to fit in my budget (the right thing to do if you are still testing your commitment to the hobby) I ended up upgrading, so I spent more money on certain essentials than I had to. AF Switzerland was my first set of screwdrivers. I later upgraded some of these to Horotec (sizes 0.60 - 1.00) - which I use most often and appreciate the "feel". There is one important thing to remember - bits are also very important. AF bits and Horotec bits are interchangeable, and Horotec bits are a bit higher quality and more expensive, but they are also "thicker". At this point, I am inclined to dress 3 bits per size with different thickness to fit different screws. Archer's pictures clearly show what happens when incorrect tools are used for the job. Unfortunately, it's not just the width of the slit, but also depth and thickness (may not be the right term, but you get the picture). No matter who makes a screwdriver, one screwdriver will never be able to fit all screws of that width. Thus you need to dress multiple bits per screwdriver.
    herdingwetcats likes this.

  5. #55
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Thanks vbomega for starting this great thread. I've found it extremely valuable.

    I have one question not yet covered here regarding case/crystal presses. I've tried a search on the forum but have not been able to find an answer.
    Anyway,... the question is:
    What is the difference between the various materials used for the press dies?
    I notice that some might be made of bakelite,... some of nylon, and others of aluminum.
    I would like to buy a cheaper case press. The expensive ones will simply cut far too deep into my tool budget. I'm willing to put up with a bit of fuss in using the cheaper variety but I'm stumped on which way to go with the dies.

    I was thinking of this set from Esslinger: LINK

    Are there better alternatives?
    Any tips on how to use these effectively?

    Cheers!
    Hidden Content MYSTERIAN

  6. #56
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    regarding this i must admit i did not want to save money.
    i bought a bergeon 5500 press and believe it or not it was not flat, when i closed the dies i had 0.5mm opening on one side.
    so i had to invest in 6173 press also from bergeon and i must admit i'm very satisfied with it.

    i like the aluminium dies as theyre strong but the make damage on the cases if you dont use a plastic bag between the case and the die.

    i liked the plastic ones but i had a problem when the thread was damaged after some use (not very long)

    so my next quest is plastic ones but with a thread of metal in the middle.

    br
    emso
    Last edited by emso; February 25th, 2013 at 01:02.

  7. #57
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    For "light" hobbyist use, plastic ones work fine (at least worked great for me). You only need them for crystals with tension rings and on snap-in casebacks. I had my press for a year and it's as good as new. Paid something like $20 at Otto Frei.

  8. #58
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Thanks so much for the quick replies guys!
    I'm truly in the "light hobbyist" "beginner" category, & I'll primarily be using a press mostly for stubborn snap case backs.
    Fingers crossed,... I hope it does the trick!

    Cheers!
    Hidden Content MYSTERIAN

  9. #59
    Member gbpackk's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Thanks Vebomega for this thread and the time it took you to provide it. Also thanks to all that have added to it. I am really getting a lot of great info. I posted this on another area but thougt I would bring it here too to introduce myself: " Hi, I wanted to introduce myself. I am new to this site and am new to watch repair/collecting. I have been a machinist and copier repair tech for my whole life. Due to a back injury and now back surgery this week I find myself at a bit of a cross roads. Some here might understand I find myself to be 50 yrs old and in the beginning of a carrier change. I have always been fascinated by pocket watches and grandfather clocks. I love the mechanics of them and find a real interest in repairing and collecting. I was hoping some might be willing to share tips for beginning in this field. I know I need to do my own homework and research myself and this site is fantastic for that. ( I have the time as I recuperate) lol
    Was just hoping for some tips on books, tools , needed items, setting up work spaces, watches to avoid, tricks and tips to start etc. Any info would be appreciated. Again thanks in advance and my prayer is that in the future I might be able to contribute to this fine site myself. "
    gbpackk

  10. #60
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Does one need a battery tester that tests the battery without opening the watch and also checks the circuits on a quartz

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