Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools - Page 7
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  1. #61
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by gbpackk View Post
    Thanks Vebomega for this thread and the time it took you to provide it. Also thanks to all that have added to it. I am really getting a lot of great info. I posted this on another area but thougt I would bring it here too to introduce myself: " Hi, I wanted to introduce myself. I am new to this site and am new to watch repair/collecting. I have been a machinist and copier repair tech for my whole life. Due to a back injury and now back surgery this week I find myself at a bit of a cross roads. Some here might understand I find myself to be 50 yrs old and in the beginning of a carrier change. I have always been fascinated by pocket watches and grandfather clocks. I love the mechanics of them and find a real interest in repairing and collecting. I was hoping some might be willing to share tips for beginning in this field. I know I need to do my own homework and research myself and this site is fantastic for that. ( I have the time as I recuperate) lol
    Was just hoping for some tips on books, tools , needed items, setting up work spaces, watches to avoid, tricks and tips to start etc. Any info would be appreciated. Again thanks in advance and my prayer is that in the future I might be able to contribute to this fine site myself. "
    Good luck with your back surgery as I have found myself in your position and am seeking answers as well on here. Hopefully one day we can both be on the road to what we are looking for. Cheers.

  2. #62
    Misterpeter
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by bambam650 View Post
    It's funny, when I googled this model number most of the sites that came up don't mention anything about who makes the set. Otto has this set listed under their french made screwdrivers. Star Time also says it's french made but on the photo they show the set is labeled A&F. Very confusing. Seems like the Burgeon swiss made 5-piece set from DRS is the best deal.
    Rebranded Lerrac's (Lerrac Outillage - Manufacture d'outillage pour l'horlogerie, bijouterie et l'optique - Les Fins (25) ). Facom, AF and others are doing this.

  3. #63
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Great thread,

    I read it and based on it purchased some basic tools from a local supply company. Saved me a lot of time and hassle.

  4. #64
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Scabby12 View Post
    Yeah, I will see what arrives in the toolkit Ive bought. I'm going to concentrate on old autos. I've bought several nice old well running Seiko 5, 17 & 21 jewelers lately and want to learn how to get a non-working one, well, working, as I've also bought a couple of these in nice cosmetic condition but non running. I know this isn't going to be easy but I'll buy a job lot of old ones and practice stripping and rebuilding them first before attempting anything on a good watch. I hope I'll learn the basics of watch construction/operation from this and also how my tools will perform. If I need to buy (lots??) more then so be it. Just going to be a hobby and I'm prepared to spend as much time as necessary gaining confidence before attacking anything for real.... Thanks for all the advice though, much appreciated
    10 years ago when I started fly tying I purchased a large box of materials from an estate auction sale. When I got it home my wife said it looked like the contents of someones 'junk drawer' and I think it was, but a few useful things in it more than covered my cost. Hope its the same or better for you.

  5. #65
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    I'd like to hear about recommended cleaning supplies for older watches, from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The OP says that ultrasonics will ruin parts from watches older than 1950, but I'd like to know what the alternatives are.

  6. #66
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Hello,
    I started reading "Watchmaking" by George Daniels. In the first chapter of the book there is talk of a "Pointing Machine".
    There are no pictures of this machine, nor is there an adequate description of it. As far as I can make out it is something akin to a pantographe, for replicating drawings to scale.
    Could someone please post a link to a picture of one? or perhaps give their own description of the machine and its purpose?

    thanks.

  7. #67
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    I'd like to hear about recommended cleaning supplies for older watches, from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The OP says that ultrasonics will ruin parts from watches older than 1950, but I'd like to know what the alternatives are.
    Specifically the OP says ultrasonics will damange "plating" on old parts. Perhaps it is acceptable to use on the non-plated parts.
    Last edited by FrankR; October 4th, 2013 at 01:39. Reason: forgot to quote other post

  8. #68
    Member dacattoo's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Tough to add to 7 pages of suggestions. Here is one that I discovered in a Goodwill store 10 years ago. I use it every day and toss it to my dog when I am finished with it. Then it is back to Goodwill for another. Score! 25 cents usually.


    Name:  Action-Line-Official-Nhl-Hockey-Puck_20090804944.jpg
Views: 2635
Size:  249.7 KB The right diameter to sit on my bench. Has a height of about an inch, allowing me some room underneath whatever I am working on. The surface sticks to the bench top and is easy on watch finishes. It is somewhat self healing. Driving a band pin into the surface won't destroy it. I love it. You will too I think. Best of all Bergeon doesn't sell them! Yet.
    Last edited by dacattoo; October 17th, 2013 at 16:05.
    pithy and Tomas472 like this.

  9. #69
    Member dacattoo's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    No
    pithy likes this.

  10. #70
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    I use CL for everything, and for whatever reason, the idea of looking for an appreciable jewelers/watchmakers bench/desk escaped me. I was soooo close...one just sold w/ tools included for $250...the next best one is just the desk for $500 ha.

    And so the search continues.

    vbomega, thanks for initiating this---seems to have helped a lot of people get started in this (what I hope to be) wonderful hobby.


    Quote Originally Posted by GeneJockey View Post
    One thing I would say is not to give up on the idea of getting a watchmakers bench.

    When I started out working on watches, I QUICKLY realized that I could not work hunched over at the table in a standard chair. There was no way to see and work at the same time. I took the opposite approach from vbomega's - instead of raising the work, I lowered the worker. I used an old ottoman to sit on which placed the table top at mid-chest height. This made all the difference! But I had to clear off my work area periodically for dinners, and there were many other issues.

    One day, completely on a whim, I searched the local Craigs List for 'Watchmaker Desk', and by golly, THERE WAS ONE!



    We went and got it for only $265 - way less than the price new from Frei!. But it needed to be refinished to achieve Spousal Acceptance. It had been badly re-stained and refinished. Darn thing looked like it had been in a fire!



    With that done, it has taken its place in the living area, and I no longer have to worry about things getting pushed off the edge when the kids clear the table for dinner!



    EDIT: Oh, and most of the things that vbomega recommends can be found used for cheaper than Frei charges, if you're willing to search, and wait. Everything except, oddly enough, screwdrivers. I still have to get me a good set of AF Switzerlands for the smaller sizes - the bigger ones only get used once during disassembly and once during reassembly at most.
    Something about the mechanical watch is fascinating in that its remained relatively unchanged for so long. In a world of constant change, The object we turn to track our time has remained largely unchanged since the 17th century. If that isn't a paradoxical kick in the modern age pants, i do not know what is!

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