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  1. #71
    Member Arie Kabaalstra's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    I'm fairly new in watch repairs, but this is a very helpful thread..

    GeneJockey: You were quite lucky with that workbench.. nice..

    I have some tips that might be helpful.. For storage of parts for instance.. if you know someone working as a metal machinist.. ask him for empty insertboxes.. in cutting tools for metal, inserts made of tungsten carbide or ceramics are used.. these come in small plastic boxes, with a sliding lid.. with 5 or 10 compartments



    as you can see.. an entire FE 68 movement fits inside..
    these boxes often can be clicked together, so if you have multiple boxes containing parts of one movement.. click em together..so they stay together..

    I'm a toolmaker by profession.. so making tools is what i did..
    A movement holder.. no one can do without it.. so.. 2 hours in the shed.. and i had.. This



    and a Case holder.. well.. i had some Polyethylene barstock and brass rod left over..



    Works like a charm..

    after having trouble with antimagnetic tweezers that weren't exactly antimagnetic.. i made my own tweezers out of some titanium sheet..

    I love that "cabinet with working surface to put on top of a regular desk.. nice solution.. but.. one can also build his own "made to size" workbench..
    I bought to steel cabinets (dentist cabinets) from a salvage shop, made 4 legs for each one to make them higher..



    Put a thick plywood worksurface on top. and glued on some laminated floorpanels.. ( a piece of vinyl flooring would also do nicely )

    the "cut-out" is because of the fact that i also make jewelry, and the cloth underneath is for collecting silver chips and.. preventing small parts from falling all the way to the floor..

    I also use this workbench for scalemodeling.. and i like adding small details to my models.. so a workbench like this is perfect.. althoug i will be building a "dedicated" watchmakers workbench in the near future.. filing silver and plastic parts.. along working with watches don't really mix well..
    Finishing watchcases and other parts can be done at the jewellers bench. but watch maintenance and repairs will be carried out on the new bench..
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  2. #72
    Member dacattoo's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    If one has an Ikea store nearby you will find Beech butcher block laminate countertops that make excellent and attractive bench tops. I used Craftsman tool chests and an Ikea top to make my bench. I don't care for the traditional benches with poorly fitting wooden drawers that won't hold everything I would like them to hold.

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    Last edited by dacattoo; November 26th, 2013 at 18:39.
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  3. #73
    Member dacattoo's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    I see reviews on screwdrivers occasionally but rarely see references to the care and feeding of them. One doesn't purchase screwdrivers and use them forever and ever without some attention. An ill fitting or poorly maintained screwdriver can not only be frustrating to use but can damage a watch quite severely. The equipment to "tune" your screwdrivers is pretty simple. The kit consists of a large sharpening stone and a fixture to hold the screwdriver at the proper angle.

    The spring loaded fixture runs on roller bearings and is available from Bergeon or as an indistinguishable generic on your favorite auction site. Sqeezing the two bearings causes a hole to open where you insert a screwdriver. Releasing the pressure on the bearings causes the screwdriver to be captured in the hole tightly. Adjusting the length the driver is inserted will determine the angle on the tip. Run the fixture on the bearing wheels back and forth on the stone and then flip over and do the other side. When you are pleased dress the end to the thickness you wish by holding the driver perpendicular to the stone. Voila! Most likely better than new. You can actually make your own tips from scratch quite easily if you have some blued stock in different diameters. Here are some pictures
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    Also in the pictures are two sets of screwdrivers on my bench. The set on the left is Bergeon 6899-S and have a vinyl sleeve on the barrel of the driver. Sounds like a good idea until a couple of years down the road the sleeve slides around. I would not recommend these for that reason only. I actually prefer the second set, the Horotec drivers. They have ball bearing tops and are slightly heavier which I like. It is easy to spend several hundreds of dollars on screwdrivers. Don't ask me how I know that.
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    Last edited by dacattoo; November 26th, 2013 at 18:33.
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  4. #74
    Member dacattoo's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    This contribution comes from the auto parts store. I discovered some very inexpensive floor mats for the back seat that provide bench mats I like. One side of the mat is smooth and the other side is corrugated. The smooth side works for me as a bench mat on which to work. Firm but easy on parts. Not hard like the traditional green mats that always seemed to bounce parts about. The other side is corrugated and works to hold round tools from rolling off the bench. Cut to suit yourself with a sharp knife. When dirty wash with soap and water or if stained wipe with acetone. Cheap enough I toss them and replace when necessary.

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    Last edited by dacattoo; November 26th, 2013 at 18:41.
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  5. #75
    Member Arie Kabaalstra's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Nice tip on the screwdriver grinding tool.. i've seen those.. great tool.. this kind of tool is "next" on my "tools to make" list.. i have a lathe and a mill so.. that's easy..

    about the working mats.. a leftover piece vinyl flooring turned upside-down also works great als a working mat.. the corrugated surface of a car mat is indeed great for preventing round things rolling around..

  6. #76
    Member Arie Kabaalstra's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    About Ikea as a "supplier".. i designed this workbench...



    can be built for around €300,- with drawers and top from Ikea, and the frame from a different supplier..

    the Frame is modular.. just order longer beams if you want a higher or wider bench..
    You could also add a screensupport., so you can use a PC at the bench, for finding parts, or using a USB Microscope..

  7. #77
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    I know this might not be the place to ask, but there seems to be a lack of posted knowledge regarding oils. I'm looking to do some overhauls of vintage to new movements, low to high beat, chrono / non-chrono, and I can't seem to figure out a combination of oils that won't break the bank.

    I figured it would be easiest to derive my list from the oiling chart of an eta 2824-2. From what I've read the same techniques / oils can be applied to earlier movements.

    This leads me to need the following:
    Moebius HP-1300 $28
    Moebius 9010 $27
    Moebius 9415 $33 (or would I need both 941 / 9415 if I'm working on low and high beat movements?)
    Moebius 9501 $76 (?!) (10ml, smallest size from cousins, for one application point according to the oiling chart)

    So I guess what I'm asking is, do I need these oils? Do I have any alternatives? Really if I could just skip the 9501 (grease) I would feel fine cost wise.

    EDIT: I guess the oiling chart doesn't actually cover replacing the mainspring? Or is it supposed to be oiled externally with HP-1300 as it shows? I figure I otherwise need Moebius 8300 to replace mainsprings. What would you recommend for someone wanting to get into the game as a hobby?

    EDIT2: I found this bergeon grease that is half the price of the Moebius 9501 - intended for what I presume is the same application? Would it be an ok replacement? https://www.cousinsuk.com/catalog/co...ergeon-syringe
    Last edited by Shoefish8; August 29th, 2014 at 21:16.
    Junghans Max Bill Chronoscope | Junghans Max Bill Automatic - willing to let go | Milsub inspired build - Raven case, MKII dial, Milsub hands | Pilot coin edge bezel build - A watch my girlfriend proudly wears |
    Marcello C Nettuno 3 - Bought for parts, on it's way out | ​Omega Seamaster - gold plated 1959 model


    Please feel free to contact me if you want to talk about custom builds :) I am interested in custom services including dial and case work as well as acquiring parts and tools.

  8. #78
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    You should use molykote dx instead of 9501/9504 does not spread so fast and by my opinion is better.
    Regarding the exchanging of the mainspring you will need one more for the automatics barrel wall, it is kluber p125

    8300 you wont need as modern mainsprings are mostly teflon coated,besides if mainspring is good theoretically you would not need grease on the barrel cover and bottom.

    Also you will be fine with the 9415 and you wont notice the difference when using it instead of 941 on low freq. movements

    br
    emso



    p.s: sent from my s****y phone so sorry for typing mistakes
    Shoefish8 likes this.
    Experience on watch movements repair:

    modern swiss movements: 5
    japan movements: 3
    older movements: 2
    chinese movements: 0


    According to above experience grades(smallest 0-5 highest) my advice can be incorect or completely out of mind, so beware and take my advices with caution if the grade is low!!!
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  9. #79
    Member pithy's Avatar
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Shoefish8 View Post
    . . . . there seems to be a lack of posted knowledge regarding oils. . . . .
    You may wish to use the search function.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  10. #80
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    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by emso View Post
    You should use molykote dx instead of 9501/9504 does not spread so fast and by my opinion is better.
    Regarding the exchanging of the mainspring you will need one more for the automatics barrel wall, it is kluber p125

    8300 you wont need as modern mainsprings are mostly teflon coated,besides if mainspring is good theoretically you would not need grease on the barrel cover and bottom.

    Also you will be fine with the 9415 and you wont notice the difference when using it instead of 941 on low freq. movements

    br
    emso



    p.s: sent from my s****y phone so sorry for typing mistakes
    Thank you for your help, it was just what I needed, some personal reassurance of my hypothesis. How come I have never seen Kluber mentioned before? Is this a personal preference or something I've missed?

    Quote Originally Posted by pithy View Post
    You may wish to use the search function.
    Thank you for linking that picture, but it is already safely stored on my HD from extensive previous searches. My question was one of practical realities and required experience I had not yet found elsewhere. The chart, although helpful, does not answer the question of if I will be covering my bases acquiring the set of oils referred to in my original post.
    Junghans Max Bill Chronoscope | Junghans Max Bill Automatic - willing to let go | Milsub inspired build - Raven case, MKII dial, Milsub hands | Pilot coin edge bezel build - A watch my girlfriend proudly wears |
    Marcello C Nettuno 3 - Bought for parts, on it's way out | ​Omega Seamaster - gold plated 1959 model


    Please feel free to contact me if you want to talk about custom builds :) I am interested in custom services including dial and case work as well as acquiring parts and tools.

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