Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools - Page 9
Like Tree61Likes

Thread: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Results 81 to 85 of 85
  1. #81
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    922

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Shoefish8 View Post
    Thank you for your help, it was just what I needed, some personal reassurance of my hypothesis. How come I have never seen Kluber mentioned before? Is this a personal preference or something I've missed?
    .
    it is something you have missed.

    br
    emso
    Experience on watch movements repair:

    modern swiss movements: 5
    japan movements: 3
    older movements: 2
    chinese movements: 0


    According to above experience grades(smallest 0-5 highest) my advice can be incorect or completely out of mind, so beware and take my advices with caution if the grade is low!!!
    Hidden Content
    NOT FOR SALE !!!

  2. #82
    Member pithy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    6,519

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Quote Originally Posted by Shoefish8 View Post
    . . . . there seems to be a lack of posted knowledge regarding oils. . . . .
    Not in my experience. Virtually each and every element of horological tribology has been discussed and debated extensively in this forum and buried and then exumed and examined again (sometimes repeatedly). This extends from the components of of the various lubrications, their formulations and comparisons with other basestocks and the servicibility of each. Whole discussions have been devoted to the science of tribology, documentation of physical properties and testing. Multiple discussions exist pertaining to the correct material and method application to virtually every movement component. So, again . . . not in my experience . . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Shoefish8 View Post
    . . . . and I can't seem to figure out a combination of oils that won't break the bank. . . .
    As your finances are unknown, it is impossible to make informed comment in this specific regard but, generally speaking, being cheap won't allow you to procure the tools and material to facilitate quality watch repair irrespective of your desire to pursue it as a hobby or a vocation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shoefish8 View Post
    . . . My question was one of practical realities and required experience I had not yet found elsewhere. . . .
    My answer to this is that you may wish to more closely examine the previous threads because this has been absolutely talked to death on this forum as the tombstones are too numerous for any observant individual to miss.

  3. #83
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    87

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Thanks for the well thought out reply. I have spent many nights researching oils, but I guess it boils down to not being able to appropriately curate and synthesize the available information without the experience and knowledge needed to asess the vast amount of great / not so great literature out there on the topic.
    Junghans Max Bill Chronoscope | Junghans Max Bill Automatic - willing to let go | Milsub inspired build - Raven case, MKII dial, Milsub hands | Pilot coin edge bezel build - A watch my girlfriend proudly wears |
    Marcello C Nettuno 3 - Bought for parts, on it's way out | ​Omega Seamaster - gold plated 1959 model


    Please feel free to contact me if you want to talk about custom builds :) I am interested in custom services including dial and case work as well as acquiring parts and tools.

  4. #84
    Member Da Maui Life's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Maui, Hawaii
    Posts
    142

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    Iíve been looking for some brass tweezers and came across some Dumont, (trio) but Iím not sure how to value a used set. Or am I better off passing on used tweezers?


    Name:  $_12.JPG
Views: 1403
Size:  28.2 KB


  5. #85
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,566

    Re: Getting Started: Guide to Watchmaking Tools

    These tweezers look good. You should learn how to dress the tips. To value these tweezers, look what they cost new and compare. Used brass tweezers generally don't exceed 30-50% of the new price.

Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts

    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2