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  1. #11
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    Re: Learning to Repair Watches?

    Quote Originally Posted by Samantha View Post
    Vibrating a hairspring is done after a new hairspring has the collet put on. Vibrating the hairspring will tell the watchmaker where to pin the stud. Hairspring work is manipulating the hairspring when it is out of flat and/or out of round to get it back in the flat and/or round.
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  2. #12
    Member Poseiden's Avatar
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    Re: Learning to Repair Watches?

    I was lucky here. I managed to find an instructor giving one day course in basic watch repair/servicing. It was useful and I was able to practice on some old watches I bght online. Now I am ready for the level 2 course. I guess finding out if you have the knack to take things apart and putting them back together again helps a lot. And, of course finding a good instructor to guide you along is most critical.

  3. #13
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    Re: Learning to Repair Watches?

    I'm in the similar boat of many folks who are new to taking watches apart. I normally spend my time building cars as a hobby and work in an aircraft specific machine shop during the day, watches just seem so much cleaner lol.

    I'm glad I found this sub-forum, i've already got my first batch of ebay parts watches on order and tried my hand at picking up some tools and books. tons of information in the sticky threads on here, tons of knowledge from the members. Can't wait to dive in and see how many i can screw up before getting one right!

  4. #14
    Moderator Samantha's Avatar
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    Re: Learning to Repair Watches?

    Hi Providence, welcome! Read (Fried's Watch Repairer Manual is good, as is DeCarle's book), information on this forum, study movements, how they work, etc. Learning does not have to mean destroying movements and loosing parts.
    Samantha
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  5. #15
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    Re: Learning to Repair Watches?

    well sure it doesn't have to involve destruction and mistakes. lol, but i've broken enough stuff in the automotive/aerospace world to know that it easily can and shouldn't be the end of the world. After all, it isn't like anybody will die if a watch doesn't work upon reassembly :)

    After a few weeks of reading on this forum, it seems like a good place to post up pictures and information if i end up getting stuck on something or find myself in over my head. between the books and a couple skeleton cased watches that i have, i'm hoping to be able to trial and error the first few back into life!

  6. #16
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    Re: Learning to Repair Watches?

    excellent analysis - and remember, patience is a MAJOR requirement to watchmaking. :)
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  7. #17
    Member maclerche's Avatar
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    Re: Learning to Repair Watches?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bodhi6 View Post
    I'm curious how difficult it would be to learn to repair watches, specifically mechanical movements? Any thoughts?
    Try this out, its a great way to start ! https://learnwatchmaking.com
    Best regards
    Henry Lerche Rasmussen
    Denmark

  8. #18
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    Re: Learning to Repair Watches?

    Beginning with classic car restoration, I have always been interested in fixing things. I too wanted to learn how to repair/restore watches. It is not easy. But definitely a great hobby if you have the time to learn. My advice would be to buy a cheap mechanical watch and tinker. You will mess up the first few (or many) times, but I am a firm believer that you learn the most by "doing" rather than "studying".


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  9. #19
    Member CJRuch's Avatar
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    Re: Learning to Repair Watches?

    Bodhi6, I am in the same boat. What I can tell you is that there are a lot of movements available to practice on at the goodwill & ebay auctions. I am a huge Hamilton fan, and there are a lot of vintage Hamilton movements on either site, along with Wittnauer, Elgin, Bulova, Timex, etc., I will put it like this, my love of everything watches keep me going and learning. Otherwise it is extremely frustrating-be prepared to break stuff and have to buy replacement movements to scavenge parts from, etc. However, you get better each time. For instance, today I broke a pinion on an escape wheel for a Hamilton 748, but figured out how to polish a gold case an acrylic crystal to perfection, after messing a bunch up. It is a very incremental process... the internet is your friend, especially this site. I generally search whatever movement I will be working on, and there is a good chance that someone has done what I am attempting and posted a walk through.
    Breitling Colt
    Hamilton Jazzmaster Viewmatic
    Hamilton X-wind Khaki
    Hamilton thinline~40's-50's
    Hamilton (as yet unidentified model)
    Mido Multifort Chronograph Special Edition II
    Oris Big Crown-Date Pointer
    Citizen Eco Drive Chronograph/Depth Sensor Dive watch
    Citizen Eco Drive Chronograph
    Seiko Kinetic
    Seiko Automatic
    Timex Intelligent Quartz Depth Sensor Dive Watch
    Casio G-Shock

  10. #20
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    Re: Learning to Repair Watches?

    I have to agree with Samantha's assessment. Most mechanicals I can service remarkably well and I would trust myself more than a local watchmaker. However, I cannot restaff a balance or vibrate a new hairspring or make escapement adjustments.

    Repair something that is more geared toward the mechanically inclined, but not an absolute pre-requisite. Initial investment in better quality tools such as screwdrivers and tweezers is nothing less than an absolute requirement.

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