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Thread: Open source timing software.

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  1. #151
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    I got this working great on OSX thanks to the Homebrew formula. I have used two apps for iOS for timing (Hairspring & Watch Tuner) and they both seem very accurate with observed results as well as agree with each other. The s/d seems to vary more with tg however using the same mic setup and generally seems to report slower than the two iOS apps. Is there a technical reason why the timing doesn't seem as stable on tg? (sound card or OS timing limitations?). It seems they would apply to iOS as well.. otherwise really looking forward to the continued development of this. Nice job!

  2. #152
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    The microphone preamp arrived today, BTec BT26, (cheap and cheerful) , I've connected it up to my Mac and the watch mic, and it works a treat.
    The additional amplitude had resolved the beat error variance and in comparison to my timegrapher, the results are almost the same. BE is identical, amplitude within a few degrees, and BPH show -6secs compared to the t1000.

    All in all, it close enough for me, the timing errors will be due to the internal clock of the Mac, so if the designer gets a chance to put in some kind of tuning, that will sort that.

    Snake


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  3. #153
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    Re: Open source timing software.


    Hi friends!

    I am very late as usual... First of all, thanks to pbnelson for his
    review. As far as I know, this is the first time that tg has been publicly
    compared to a dedicated machine: awesome work, and very interesting!

    I am also happy with the results. My expectation was +-0.5 milliseconds
    for the beat error, +-10 degrees for the amplitude, and some constant
    error of a few s/d (depending on your sound card) for the rate. The clock
    in a sound card, just like any watch or clock, has a daily rate, which we
    can express in seconds per day. This rate is, as for any watch or clock,
    subject to change with environmental conditions, notably temperature, and
    it will also slowly drift with time. A rate of plus or minus a few seconds
    per day is typical. So, with all probability, the clock in pbnelson's
    sound card is about 5 s/d slow, and this makes the readings taken through
    this sound card appear about 5 s/d too high.

    Klaus's explanation of the graphs is spot on. During every period (every
    back and forth of the balance wheel) the escapement makes two sounds,
    which we perceive as a tic and a toc. Each of these sounds is actually a
    cluster of closely spaced clicks produced by several parts colliding in
    the space of a dozen milliseconds. The lower graph represents the entire
    period of the watch, so one tic-toc, the two upper graphs are enlargements
    of the tic and the toc portions (highlighted in blue in the lower graph).
    The three blobs that you can usually see in the tic and toc graphs are the
    traces of the clicks made, from left to right, by the impulse jewel
    hitting the fork, by the escapement unlocking (i.e. when the fork begins
    to push on the impulse jewel), and finally by the escapement locking
    again. If tg works correctly the third click should be aligned on the zero
    milliseconds mark, if it is so, then the position of the first one marks
    the amplitude over the amplitude scale. Tg also draws a little blue line
    to mark the place where it thinks that the first click is.

    Calibration is now the most requested feature, so it is next to come!

    I have just uploaded a new version of tg. Except bugfixes it has the same
    interface as the old one, but the algorithm is multithreaded, so it should
    run considerably smoother on multi-core machines (almost all modern
    computers). The Windows binary is in the usual place. The source code is
    in a branch called "test". I will move it to the master branch as soon as
    dmnc's homebrew recipe is confirmed to support the new version (so if you
    want to try it on a mac, for now, you have to install manually).
    WiZARD7 and pbnelson like this.

  4. #154
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    Quote Originally Posted by paranoidroid View Post
    I have used two apps for iOS for timing (Hairspring & Watch Tuner) and they both seem very accurate with observed results as well as agree with each other. The s/d seems to vary more with tg however using the same mic setup and generally seems to report slower than the two iOS apps. Is there a technical reason why the timing doesn't seem as stable on tg?
    Hi, sorry, I didn't notice your post. I really do not have much information here to give any meaningful answer. Can you send me a relatively long (say a couple of minutes) recording demonstrating the problem? With it, I can try to figure out if the variability that you see is a bug in tg or what.

  5. #155
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    need to share my experience - not regarding tg (it's awesome), but how i'm using it.
    my 007 is gaining time, it went from about +5s a day to about +50s a day over the past couple weeks, and it's magnetized. i can spin a compass dial around with it. i also realize that i'm drawing causation here...
    when I use tg with my macbook, i just set the watch on the mic. this is the only thing i can think of that could cause magnetization, i'm also guessing that the computer can generate enough of a field to cause magnetization. the best part is, i've been checking the watch with tg every couple days..... I set the watch on it and let tg listen for about a minute or so to stabilize (it may not really need much time at all). granted, i don't know for sure, it could be from something else but it's my only working theory.

    i haven't taken the watch back off, and i really don't want to with this particular watch. i'm hoping that when i use the demagnetizer (it's the blue ebay one and i know it works from using it on screwdrivers, screws, etc.), it will work without taking the movement out. I've read both that demagnetization (hold the watch on the plate, press the button, wait a bit, then draw the watch away slowly) should be done with just one position, and also that you should do it once, turn 90 degrees and repeat. so when i get home, i'm going to demagnetize from one position, then use tg with an external mic and see before/after differences.

    has anyone discovered that they're magnetizing their own watch when testing like this?

  6. #156
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    I would say you probably aren't magnetizing it with the microphone, but rather with the magnetic components inside the laptop. If your Mac has a headset jack that you can plug an iPhone headphone set (the ones with the integrated mic), try that and that will keep you away from the computer itself. I have a non-Mac laptop and I use the iPhone headset mic and it works really quite well. Even with my POS work laptop, I get a good clean signal through the iPhone headset.

    EDIT: And I didn't even answer the question...no, I'm not magnetizing my watches by testing them because I keep them away from strong magnetic sources.
    Last edited by adamant365; April 15th, 2016 at 22:16.
    evilphoton likes this.

  7. #157
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    yes, inside the laptop (is what was in my head..), that's what i meant. i've used the iphone headset in the pas also and it works well, especially with this software.

    Quote Originally Posted by adamant365 View Post
    I would say you probably aren't magnetizing it with the microphone, but rather with the magnetic components inside the laptop. If your Mac has a headset jack that you can plug an iPhone headphone set (the ones with the integrated mic), try that and that will keep you away from the computer itself. I have a non-Mac laptop and I use the iPhone headset mic and it works really quite well. Even with my POS work laptop, I get a good clean signal through the iPhone headset.

    EDIT: And I didn't even answer the question...no, I'm not magnetizing my watches by testing them because I keep them away from strong magnetic sources.

  8. #158
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    Quote Originally Posted by contrate_wheel View Post
    Hi, sorry, I didn't notice your post. I really do not have much information here to give any meaningful answer. Can you send me a relatively long (say a couple of minutes) recording demonstrating the problem? With it, I can try to figure out if the variability that you see is a bug in tg or what.
    I think you actually answered it in a previous post. My issue was tg is reporting 5s slower than the iOS apps I'm using (which reflect reality so I assume is accurate). It could be the explanation is the sound card I'm using in my Mac is just running at an offset than my iPhone with the iOS apps..

  9. #159
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    Built like a champ for me using brew under OSX 10.11.3. Worked fantastic with a couple of pocket watches. i need to work on a mic setup for smaller wristwatches, for the pocket watches I just used an iphone headphone/mic combo.

    Thanks for this.
    David

  10. #160
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    Just discovered this thread. Wow. Thank you CW.
    Ran the exe on Win10 using a cheap logitech webcam mic:
    Name:  20160516_104705_r.jpg
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Size:  110.7 KB

    My Speedbird3 with ETA2824-2 gave following results face up off wrist (~20C):
    Name:  TG Speedbird3.jpg
Views: 265
Size:  91.4 KB

    This is within half a second of my off wrist face up real world comparison - like I said... Wow.
    Now I need to go an research the difference in shape between my tick and tock to see if I need to be worried
    linux.author likes this.

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