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  1. #271
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    Working great using a guitar pickup, running Mint 18.1 64bit. But failed to detect Seiko Monster's beat, probably have to open it.

    It's a great piece of software. Thank you contrate_wheel!

  2. #272
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    Hi chaps,
    I'm trying to get TG working but I just find one problem after other, and don't really know where to head now.

    When I had Windows, I managed to get inconsistent signal on TG. I tried to regulate my watch, using a piezo mic, but the signal was so inconsistent that it was impossible.
    I tried some external USB sondcard, but didn't work.
    I think didn't work, because the signal from the piezo mic, is pretty small, and needs amplification. And the sound card I used, didn't amplified.

    Now I got Linux, is worst. I don't even get a weak signal, now TG is completely dead.
    When I connect a normal mic on my Laptop, (and don't use TG) ... I get a normal signal on Pulseaudio and Audacity. However, normal mic on TG, not signal at all, completely dead. Because I am new in Linux, I don't know if I could increase the mic's gain. If this is not possible, I don't want to waste more time with this, and try something else.

    If I can not increase the mic gain on my Linux, then I was thinking to try one of these: USB guitar interface. The problem is it doesn't seem to work on Linux (only on Windows, or Mc)... so a new problem .

    If the USB interface does not work,... well ... the only thing I can think of is to use a proper mic preamp. This must work. But must be some DIY job to connect to the PC, (and, I don't know about electronics) .
    I just have one mechanical watch, and under normal circumstances we only need to regulate a watch once. So to buy a preamp; and the DIY just to one off, ... don't know if its worth it.

  3. #273
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    Hi my friend,

    since you say that Audacity is working for you, please record about one minute of sound from your favorite watch, at a reasonable gain setting, and send it to me, or even better post it here. With it I will try to diagnose the problem.

  4. #274
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    I'm thinking of porting this to Arduino to create an open source design for the hardware. It would be similar to the Weishi Timegrapher. Does anyone want to join in on development?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Raydius likes this.

  5. #275
    Member 1afc's Avatar
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ciro View Post
    Hi chaps,
    I'm trying to get TG working but I just find one problem after other, and don't really know where to head now.

    When I had Windows, I managed to get inconsistent signal on TG. I tried to regulate my watch, using a piezo mic, but the signal was so inconsistent that it was impossible.
    I tried some external USB sondcard, but didn't work.
    I think didn't work, because the signal from the piezo mic, is pretty small, and needs amplification. And the sound card I used, didn't amplified.

    Now I got Linux, is worst. I don't even get a weak signal, now TG is completely dead.
    When I connect a normal mic on my Laptop, (and don't use TG) ... I get a normal signal on Pulseaudio and Audacity. However, normal mic on TG, not signal at all, completely dead. Because I am new in Linux, I don't know if I could increase the mic's gain. If this is not possible, I don't want to waste more time with this, and try something else.

    If I can not increase the mic gain on my Linux, then I was thinking to try one of these: USB guitar interface. The problem is it doesn't seem to work on Linux (only on Windows, or Mc)... so a new problem .

    If the USB interface does not work,... well ... the only thing I can think of is to use a proper mic preamp. This must work. But must be some DIY job to connect to the PC, (and, I don't know about electronics) .
    I just have one mechanical watch, and under normal circumstances we only need to regulate a watch once. So to buy a preamp; and the DIY just to one off, ... don't know if its worth it.
    The software, including calibration, has always worked very well for me on Windoze.
    However, I have had a Dickens trying to get a mic to work.
    I've started up a thread on mic only and the suggestions have been pre amps etc. I didn't want to go to that complexity yet.
    However, on a windows notebook the inbuilt mic worked very well.
    I have also found that web cam mics are also pretty good at filtering noise and when I plugged one in to the USB on my desktop I got a good stable scan.

    I have found that any extraneous noise really hurts the signal. I know it's dumb but I was showing my brother how tg worked and we were talking softly in the background and that totally wrecked the signal.
    For those that are ready to write "Well what did you expect!" the answer is I didn't think about it until I had a problem. Doh!

    HTH

  6. #276
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    Quote Originally Posted by scholzie View Post
    I'm thinking of porting this to Arduino to create an open source design for the hardware. It would be similar to the Weishi Timegrapher. Does anyone want to join in on development?
    I have recently bought an Arduino Uno but I'm a complete noob.
    Willing to do things that are within my capability but I'm expecting that this is going to involve reading an analog signal so therefore there has to be an external mic and probably amp.
    Would it not be more productive to just produce a great mic/preamp and use the standard tg?
    At least I'd suggest an external mic would be the starting point and when that works then port to Arduino?

  7. #277
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    These are amplifier and guitar pickup microphone clip on. You can get the good signal from them.
    Amplifier: Linep
    Guitar pickup microphone clip on: Cherub or Korg
    Name:  mic.JPG
Views: 118
Size:  139.3 KB

  8. #278
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    Linux Mint has an excellent sound utility that lets you select the default audio input device and adjust the amplification level. If you don't know where to find it, just try searching for the "sound" application. For other distros: Google is your friend. Apart from that, there are numerous USB sound cards under $10, with separate mic. inputs, compatible with Linux - no special device driver installation required. I recently got one from Sabrent that would fit the bill.
    FireMonk3y likes this.

    p.s. Does anyone know the lift angle on an Orient 46D movement? I'm reduced to begging. If anyone knows, please respond by PM or on my Hidden Content so I can change this stupid signature.

  9. #279
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    Open source timing software.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1afc View Post
    I have recently bought an Arduino Uno but I'm a complete noob.
    Willing to do things that are within my capability but I'm expecting that this is going to involve reading an analog signal so therefore there has to be an external mic and probably amp.
    Would it not be more productive to just produce a great mic/preamp and use the standard tg?
    At least I'd suggest an external mic would be the starting point and when that works then port to Arduino?
    This project isn't about just getting it working. I'd like to expand upon it and use the real time processing benefits that a microcontroller brings to the table. Getting tg to work with a mic isn't difficult. A piezo actuator with some vibration isolation is sufficient. You can add an EQ (or a tuned band pass filter) in line to isolate the sound even better.

    In your case, it would be much more productive to use a good mic and tg on a PC. Porting to Arduino will take a bit of doing... Tg's algorithms should be easy to port - they're already in C - but there's no input sound processing or display output there.

    I'd also like to put in a lift angle input for an amplitude calculator, which I don't know the equations for. Shouldn't be too hard to figure out though.

    I think using a microcontroller will make it easier to pick out the five shock event sounds and actually calculate beat error, rather than just +/- s/day, but that will all come later after I get the basic version working.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by scholzie; May 22nd, 2017 at 14:26.

  10. #280
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    Re: Open source timing software.

    @scholzie.

    Building an arduino-based timegrapher is surely going to be fun and good experience for you. For what I can, I will do my best to contribute my two cents if you have any questions.

    Porting tg to arduino is probably not going to work. Virtually all software timegraphers except tg use the same simple approach of detecting a sound when a certain threshold is exceeded. Tg, on the other hand, was designed as an experiment around a different method. As you will see from tg's cpu usage, it is far too hungry of computational horsepower to work on a microcontroller. On such a small machine, the traditional approach would be probably a better choice. (Or maybe you can set up some sort of phase locked loop to detect the period and work from there...)

    Remember that real time capability is not a plus to make a timegrapher. A sound signal is just a sequence of samples: if you process them instantly, after one second, or after an hour, the information contained in them is not going to change. Real time will be a plus, however, if you want to add some fancy gadget to it, for instance a stroboscopic light.

    A possible caveat: before even beginning, I would suggest to test the accuracy and stability of arduino's clock (not the rtc, the one that governs the sampling frequency of your adc). If the clock turns out to be bad, there is little one can do.

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