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  1. #11
    Moderator Samantha's Avatar
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    Re: Ruined hairspring

    Correct tools for the job. Whereas a case holder might hold a movement, I find them to big and cumbersome. Hence, I have always used the correct tool, which is a movement holder. Be careful using a toothpick. Some regulators are more difficult to move than others - you wouldn't want the toothpick to bend/break and cause additional damage. A short needle mounted in a good piece of pegwood or a small dowel works good and is strong enough for tighter regulators.
    Samantha

  2. #12
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    Re: Ruined hairspring

    Image of the "ruined" hs, please?
    Another note...if either movement has Seiko's version of the ETAchron regulator system, then simply moving the stud holder and regulator arms about, may be inadequate. A microscope to visualize the centering of the hs between the regulator pins really helps...and also helps with adjustment of the gap...
    As others has mentioned...to stay away from the hs, you need to be able to see what you are doing and use the right tool(s) to conduct the work.
    Regards, BG

  3. #13
    Member JustBlueFish's Avatar
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    Ruined hairspring

    Is a toothpick really the best tool? I've heard it suggested many times. I'm afraid the tip would snap/break off while manipulating the watch. I used a small metal punch to actuate the regulator arms. Perhaps that's why I slipped. What is the preferred tool to manipulate the device?

    I can't take a picture of the HS, I just tossed the watch in the garbage I was so angry with myself. In hindsight I should have saved it but it was a very inexpensive Seiko 5 so no huge loss.

    But, it was so jacked up the balance wouldn't even spin.


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    Last edited by JustBlueFish; March 2nd, 2017 at 20:34.

  4. #14
    Member JustBlueFish's Avatar
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    Ruined hairspring

    Here's the results I got on the watch I didn't mess up, my Skx007 Seiko. I was getting 1.3-1.5 ms of beat error which I got to .3-.4 and it was running about 10 seconds slow. The other positions also were improved quite a bit.


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    Last edited by JustBlueFish; March 2nd, 2017 at 20:57.

  5. #15
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    Re: Ruined hairspring

    Looks good JustBlueFish. I have the same timer and it works really well. Self teaching yourself certainly has its liabilities, but you are in the right place to get solid advice. I've been lucky in that I haven't really screwed too much up during my attempts to learn, but I certainly provided myself with plenty of opportunities to really screw something up.

    I've found this forum invaluable, as well as You Tube. Of course, it always looks easy when somebody that knows what the hell they are doing is performing the task! Lol

    not sure if you have the desire, but if you want to gain some dexterity, buy a Cheap Chinese movement and take it apart, documenting the the disassembly with lots of photos, then reassemble. I bought a $16 movement from Essingler and got started this way. I did break one of the shock springs, they are pretty fragile, but learned a lot about working with watch movements.

  6. #16
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    Re: Ruined hairspring

    I've only ruined one hairspring in my life. It was 2am and I was tired too lazy to reach for a tweezer while removing a balance bridge screw and the entire bridge and balance came with. The hairspring turned into a complete bird's nest. I spent about 6 hours on it and partially untangled it, but could not finish it. A sewing needle helps to concentrically separate the coils. A number 4 or 5 tweezer is usually recommmended, but I find it's easier to manipulate them with a #2. A visor helps but is cumbersome. I find a dissecting microscope superior to any loupe I've used.

    If working on a late model Seiko such as you mentioned you can easily purchase a new complete balance and hairspring and replace it rather than deal with a severely damaged hairspring. Unfortunately these are hard to find for older or vintage watches.

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