A Watchmaker's Library - Page 2
Like Tree67Likes

Thread: A Watchmaker's Library

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 70
  1. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    where unicorns .... out rainbows
    Posts
    47

    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    Great thread! Thanks for the recommendations. I did a search on Joseph Bulova School of Watchmaking and found a scanned copy. Seems to have really clear information for the beginner to understand.
    herdingwetcats likes this.

  2. #12
    Member dacattoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Stevensville, Montana
    Posts
    1,122

    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    "As work proceeded it was realized that a job had been started which need never end, because the designing of watches has not stood still since the first watch was made and will go on developing and progressing until the end of time itself."
    This statement written in the early 1940s was by a man that wrote a book designed for the watch repairer that "couldn't read so good". Indeed almost every page has a wonderful drawing of an example in the text. Don't take me wrong, this is no light weight offering, no, this is possibly the most recommended book of our times. It was written by a Brit in the mid 1940s.

    Name:  DSC00085.JPG
Views: 2056
Size:  131.6 KBName:  DSC00086.JPG
Views: 2059
Size:  138.3 KBName:  DSC00087.JPG
Views: 2054
Size:  121.7 KBName:  DSC00088.JPG
Views: 2051
Size:  133.8 KBName:  DSC00089.JPG
Views: 2047
Size:  132.9 KBName:  DSC00090.JPG
Views: 2036
Size:  126.1 KBName:  DSC00091.JPG
Views: 2040
Size:  138.0 KB

  3. #13
    Member ZuZuDaDDy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    150

    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    Another book for the library. Very good read.

    Name:  IMG_4182.JPG
Views: 2015
Size:  135.6 KB
    jesse1 and goatscapeable like this.

  4. #14
    Member pithy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    6,774

    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    Stole my thunder. I've been giving them for gifts. Great illustrations from antiquity and the translations are particularly valuable for ascertaining the context.
    "PLEASE NOTE: No watchmakers were maimed during this filming." Hidden Content Hidden Content

  5. #15
    Member pithy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    6,774

    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    A copy of "Handbook of Watch and Clock Repairs" was given to me by an old friend (from his deceased father's library). This is one of the Emerson Books series of diys'ers including such immortal titles as "Handbook of Lawn Mower Repair", "Collecting Antique Jewellery", "Net Making" (personal favorite), "Gem Testing", etc.

    One hundred sixteen pages (of one hundred, seventy-six) deal with watches. One of the few books written exclusively for the hobbyist and a few off the wall topics including some pin lever content. An easy read and if you are a WIS and find this for a couple bucks - probably worth it as it could likely expand your technical knowledge base. Some good diagrams and a nice (if simple) section on shock jewels. If you are certain that you are going to make a long term commitment to watchmaking - pass on this and invest in more advanced texts. H.G. Harris is credited with a couple of other horological titles that I haven't personally flipped through yet.
    Attached Images Attached Images

    goatscapeable likes this.
    "PLEASE NOTE: No watchmakers were maimed during this filming." Hidden Content Hidden Content

  6. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    5,790

    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    Quote Originally Posted by dacattoo View Post
    "As work proceeded it was realized that a job had been started which need never end, because the designing of watches has not stood still since the first watch was made and will go on developing and progressing until the end of time itself."
    This statement written in the early 1940s was by a man that wrote a book designed for the watch repairer that "couldn't read so good". Indeed almost every page has a wonderful drawing of an example in the text. Don't take me wrong, this is no light weight offering, no, this is possibly the most recommended book of our times. It was written by a Brit in the mid 1940s.
    I have his "Practical Clock Repairing" book; similarly worthy, especially for British-style mantel clocks.

    Rick "reading this thread with interest" Denney
    Zenith: Captain Chronograph 03.2110.400*; Cartier: Santos 100 XL Concord: Mariner, C1 Big-Date, C1 v.2 Chronograph; Ebel: Chronosport 1134901, Tekton 9137L83*, Type E 9137C41* (*=COSC)
    Ebel: 1911 BTR 9137L73* and 9139L71*, 1911 1120L41*, 1911 Senior 9080241, Brasilias 9120M41 (2), Aquatica 500 9120K61, Classic Hexagon GMT 9301F61, Classic 100 LE 9120R41; Baume & Mercier: Capeland World-Timer
    Heuer: Carrera 1964 Re-Edition CS3110; Maurice Lacroix: Masterpiece MP6439; "Seagull": 1963 Reissue cal. ST19; Seiko: Black Monster SRP307; Poljot: Sturmanskie cal. 3133; Tissot: T-Touch Lew and Huey: Acciona
    Vintage: JLC: ref. 2953, ca. 1946; Longines: Flagship cal 285; Zodiac: SST cal. 86, Aerospace GMT cal. 72; Favre-Leuba: cal. 253; Tianjin: Dong Feng cal. ST5; Elgin: Gr. 152 (1898), Gr. 384 (1919); Ebel: ca. 1962 ref. 9214955
    WUS: ST5 Project Watches (Black and Blue), F72.2014.DG3804 (Gray and Cream); Swatch: Sistem 51 Blue; TNT: Rattrapante cal. Rochat 7750+RAT-1

  7. #17
    Member dacattoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Stevensville, Montana
    Posts
    1,122

    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    Tenhut! Listen up grunts!
    This next offering is an actual offer. The War Department in 1945 published TM 9-1575, a maintenance training manual for the repair of wrist watches, stop watches, pocket watches and clocks. A paper back of 225 pages, it is chock full of not drawings but pictures. This book covers a lot of ground and is an excellent choice for the amateur watch repairer. Used book stores are a good source but you can actually download a pdf of the book on line here http://www.90thidpg.us/Reference/Man...M%209-1575.pdf for free. Now!

    Name:  DSC00152.JPG
Views: 1991
Size:  131.2 KBName:  DSC00153.JPG
Views: 1973
Size:  128.1 KBName:  DSC00154.jpg
Views: 2027
Size:  118.7 KBName:  DSC00155.JPG
Views: 1973
Size:  127.7 KB
    Last edited by dacattoo; November 19th, 2013 at 16:37.

  8. #18
    Member dacattoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Stevensville, Montana
    Posts
    1,122

    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    So you have mastered the "typical" watch and are sniffing around for a new challenge. You score a beat up looking chronograph with a Spiedel band and cracked crystal at the local thrift shop for what you consider a pittance. It sits on your bench for a week until you get a chance to look more closely. Opening the back of the watch, the first words out of your mouth are OMG! Where do you start? Well pardner, there is hope. Hope comes in 28 hard cover volumes. The Esembl-O-Graf is an encyclopedia offering assembly/disassembly and adjustment instructions in detail. The books contain information on all the iconic chronographs of the last century. Just like on the TV commercials, "but wait!".
    I searched for a long time for a set of these but usually ran into missing books or sky high prices. Fortunately someone scanned the entire series onto a CD and it is available for a reasonable price and you will never lose a volume! Look on your favorite auction site.

    Name:  $T2eC16d,!)!E9s2fDH+DBR+!QRVlSw~~60_35.JPG
Views: 1915
Size:  23.1 KBName:  images.jpeg
Views: 1914
Size:  10.1 KBName:  DSC00157.jpg
Views: 1925
Size:  111.4 KB
    jesse1 and goatscapeable like this.

  9. #19
    Member pithy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    6,774

    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    I've been a big promoter of E-O-G for a long time but there are some significant gaps in the caliber coverage - albeit some of these are farely esoteric ones. And they could definitely have benefitted from a better editor - but as a set - they are indispensible for those who like a lot of little subdials and eccentrics and hearts and . . . . . .

  10. #20
    Member ZuZuDaDDy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    150

    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    OK this one is not about watch repair, but it is very informational about the mysterious art of Engine Turning (Guilloché). Many people have watch cases, dials, pens, lighters etc... with this sort of decoration and wonder how did they do it. The late Martin Mathews who wrote this book was a very good friend of mine. I have 5 of these machines in various forms and love to use them. My father apprenticed to Martin in the traditional art of watch case making and earned a spot in the case makers registry in Guild Hall. It worth a look if you can find a copy, or you can find Martins Video about case making that also shows this art....

    Name:  IMG_4214.JPG
Views: 1909
Size:  126.6 KB

    Name:  IMG_4215.JPG
Views: 1908
Size:  95.9 KB
    radger, trim, dacattoo and 2 others like this.

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •