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  1. #61
    Member P. Loatman's Avatar
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    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    Antique Watch Restoration Vol. 1 by Archie B. Perkins. He also wrote The Modern Watchmakers Lathe and How To Use It.

    There are supposed to be more volumes published later, i think up to 3, but even this first volume is filled with useful restoration knowledge, pretty much everything is explained and detailed in a practical manner, and any theoretical information is really only there to support the practical information and guides. It's the only book that i've come across that gives a detailed explanation of how to use the Ingold Fraise, it even includes some theoretical data for how to select a properly sized cutter.

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  2. #62
    Member dacattoo's Avatar
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    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    I recently found myself looking for a "fancy" Accutron crystal and was stumped. Calls to Bulova, GS catalogs, Ofreis, Borel and any where else I could think of were to no avail. As a last resort before telling a very good customer that I couldn't find a crystal I tried soliciting help at Watch-u-seek. Literally in minutes I had responses. When the answers came so fast I just had to know how they knew the information I had found impossible to find. Samantha, a regular here, told me about this book which I had never seen before. It is invaluable to repairers of vintage Accutrons, Bulovas and Caravelle looking for case part numbers etc. Thank you Samantha for selling me the book.

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    Last edited by dacattoo; February 4th, 2014 at 17:38.
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  3. #63
    Member Paleotime's Avatar
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    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    I recently added a copy of Fried's "Bench Practices for Watch and Clock Makers" to my library.
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    This seems to be a good book for the intermediate student - one who is beginning to take-on hairspring issues, jeweling, etc. It also has a good section on dial repair.

    The illustrations are excellent...This 1974 addition seems to be somewhat available, and not terribly expensive.
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  4. #64
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    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    I am fairly new into watches but have always heard this is a great book for the subject: Watchmaking: George Daniels: 9780856677045: Amazon.com: Books
    I haven't read this but was wondering if anyone else has.
    Bulova 96B015
    Citizen Eco-Drive Chronograph B612 Titanium
    Bagelsport Submariner (Need strap recommendations)

  5. #65
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    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    Quote Originally Posted by asparks1 View Post
    I am fairly new into watches but have always heard this is a great book for the subject: Watchmaking: George Daniels: 9780856677045: Amazon.com: Books
    I haven't read this but was wondering if anyone else has.
    Yes I have! It's a really great book no matter you're new or already a master watchmaker! To most I speak to, they all have this in their library!

    If I'm not wrong, Roger Smith managed his first watch with the help of that book.

  6. #66
    Member dacattoo's Avatar
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    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    Mr. Smith was a protege of Mr. Daniels

    As this is a book for the more advanced watchmaker, you may be better served by starting with something a wee bit more basic to begin with. The Chicago School of Watchmaking course book perhaps. Don't get me wrong, the Daniels book is fascinating and the pictures and drawings superb but one must get a solid basic understanding at least to enjoy this book. It isn't inexpensive.

    The Chicago book can be found on auction sites quite often.
    Last edited by dacattoo; February 20th, 2015 at 21:38.
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  7. #67
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    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    I couldn't find it mentioned in this thread, but I got quite a lot of value from the following historic 'advertorial':

    PROPER USE of the WATCHMAKER'S GRAVER, Homer A. Barkus

  8. #68
    Member Paleotime's Avatar
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    Re: A Watchmaker's Library

    I recently added a copy of The Watch Escapement by Pellaton to my library...

    This book provides an excellent and extremely detailed look at the operation (and faults) of various watch escapements. It is clear and concise. The drawings are excellent. In addition to the lever escapement there is good information on pin pallet and cylinder escapements as well (some others too).
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    A bit off-topic but...reading this book reminded me of reading an article about piston design (years ago). I had just started planning the build on my first real, ground-up hot rod engine and was making sure I wasn't leaving any horsepower on the table for each dollar spent. Anyway...I had in my mind an ideal of how an internal combustion engine worked - and this idea saw combustion as an explosion.

    Then I read an article that discussed "flame propagation" across the surfaces of a piston and the relation to both the piston and the combustion chamber. And my model of what goes on in an engine had to change.

    This book was like that for me...The instant transition of the lever from one banking pin to the other became instead a series of positions, each with their own necessary conditions, compromises and problems. I had to adapt my thinking and develop a better understanding.

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