Thread: 1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

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  1. #1
    Member Cougar6's Avatar
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    1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

    A friend loaned me his copy of the Army's Technical Manual for Wrist Watches, Pocket Watches, Stop Watches, and Clocks, dated 6 April 1945.

    Is this manual well-known in this Forum? My first cursory reading of the manual last night seemed to be different from what I've read about some of the military watches here.

    I'm willing to share the contents, if there is any interest. If my memory on Army Technical Manuals is correct, this is a "depot level' manual. Used by the most experienced watch repairmen in the Army.

    -Cougar6
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    Member wemedge's Avatar
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    Re: 1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

    I've got a copy. I'm not a technical watchguy, but I've read it for my own edification as well as to guide me in any acquisitions, etc. Useful for me.

    regards,
    wemedge
    It's 1700hrs somewhere...

  3. #3
    Member lysanderxiii's Avatar
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    Re: 1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by Cougar6 View Post
    A friend loaned me his copy of the Army's Technical Manual for Wrist Watches, Pocket Watches, Stop Watches, and Clocks, dated 6 April 1945.

    Is this manual well-known in this Forum? My first cursory reading of the manual last night seemed to be different from what I've read about some of the military watches here.

    I'm willing to share the contents, if there is any interest. If my memory on Army Technical Manuals is correct, this is a "depot level' manual. Used by the most experienced watch repairmen in the Army.

    -Cougar6
    That manual only gives the most cursory glance at the A-11 watch, which is the most popular WW2 American watch (mostly due to its availability). Mainly this is due the the fact that the A-11 repair is little different from the repair of the Ordnance field watches, other than a few extra parts. The differences are covered in the manufacturer specific parts break-down manuals.

    As to: "Used by the most experienced watch repairmen in the Army." For many watch repairmen in the US Army, that manual was their first exposure to watch repair.

    It is an excellent starter book, the theory and description of operation, and section on reading a timing machine are the easiest to follow i have come across.

  4. #4
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    Re: 1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

    TM 9-1575 War Dept. Technical Manual - I have it posted on my webpage, to be viewed as a PDF file, here:

    http://www.freewebs.com/billyschorr/...atchmanual.htm

    Hope it is of use / interest.

    Kind Regards,

    Billy

  5. #5
    Moderator Emeritus Crusader's Avatar
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    Re: 1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy View Post
    TM 9-1575 War Dept. Technical Manual - I have it posted on my webpage, to be viewed as a PDF file, here:

    http://www.freewebs.com/billyschorr/...atchmanual.htm

    Hope it is of use / interest.

    Kind Regards,

    Billy
    Thank you, Billy!
    Cheers,

    Martin ("Crusader")

  6. #6
    Member johnee's Avatar
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    Re: 1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

    Yes, thanks to the OP for starting this thread and Billy for the pdf. I'm fascinated by all things military.

  7. #7
    Member Cougar6's Avatar
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    Re: 1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

    Quote Originally Posted by Billy View Post
    TM 9-1575 War Dept. Technical Manual - I have it posted on my webpage, to be viewed as a PDF file, here:

    http://www.freewebs.com/billyschorr/...atchmanual.htm

    Hope it is of use / interest.

    Kind Regards,

    Billy
    Thanks, Billy!

    Do you have the tech manual for the A-11 series of watches? Did the Army include the Hamilton "A-11's" in their tech manuals, even though the Hamilton A-11-specifications watches were not 'official'? I recently aquired a Hamilton A-11-style watch with the 2987A movement that I'm trying to find info on. Thanks.

    -Cougar6

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    Member ecalzo's Avatar
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    Re: 1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

    wooooww thanks.........
    a looot........
    G-Shocks and subs

  9. #9
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    Re: 1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

    Cougar6 - the only Hamilton A-11s that I'm aware of are those made to the Bureau of Aeronautics Specificaiton Amendments; the US Navy luminous A-11s. I'm not sure what you mean when stating the Hamilton A-11 specifications were "not official" ? Certainly the Specification Amendments which were published were offical as any other. I did do a review recently which included the BuAer A-11s on my webpage; same link as above, use the Navigation menu to the left (under Elgin A-11).

    I hope this helps answer some of your questions.

    Kind Regards,

    Billy

  10. #10
    Member Cougar6's Avatar
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    Re: 1945 Army Technical Manual on Watches

    Billy,

    I may have misspoke. It is my understanding that only Waltham, Elgin, and Boliva made watches under the Army's production standard, which was known as the "A-11". Hamilton made a similar watch but not 'officially' under this standard and therefore not really an "A-11"? Am I correct here?

    I've never heard of what official standard that Hamilton used when making watches for the US military. Did they simply make these watches with the intent to sell them to the Army and Navy (Marines) using their own standard? Obviously, the military services did buy them. The wqatches I'm referring to are the watches with the 987-series movements and the 2987 movements (I own a crusty 2987-movement watch, the ones for the Navy). Since I don't know of any official Government standard that these watches were made under, are they considered official government watches? Was there an official standard that Hamilton followed in WWII?

    I've been searching for information on my 2987 movement watch, but there doesn't seem to be a lot of readily accessable information on them. My watch has a Star case with the markings, "H-3 FSSC 88-W-800 MFR'S PART NO.39103 HAMILTON WATCH CO." on the back of the case.
    -Cougar6
    Last edited by Cougar6; February 27th, 2009 at 15:08.

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