#&*(#@! dust

Thread: #&*(#@! dust

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  1. #1
    Member gpjoe's Avatar
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    #&*(#@! dust

    OK, probably very elementary, but what is the best way of dealing with dust in close-up shots of my watches?

    I am taking macro shots of my watches using a Cannon point-and-shoot and a light cube. Right now I'm playing around with the camera's white balance, aperture and other manual settings. The lighting and focus looks pretty good but the dust seems impossible to avoid.

    I have been wiping off the watches with a cloth I received from Long Island Watch which was a freebie included with a purchase. I then us a soft bristle brush to try and capture any dust. I suppose the obvious answer is that a puff of air wouldn't hurt.

    Regardless, my approach is not working. So any suggestions for the novice? I welcome any tips that will help me spruce up my watches for photo shoots, including more thorough cleaning to remove stubborn dirt and grime.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member GuySie's Avatar
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    Re: #&*(#@! dust

    Quote Originally Posted by gpjoe View Post
    OK, probably very elementary, but what is the best way of dealing with dust in close-up shots of my watches?
    The clone/heal tool in Photoshop. When you get close, you get dust. Your room is probably not an intel chip fabrication lab, so the best you can do cleanroom wise is just wipe everything off best as you can and remove any remaining spots in postprocessing.

  3. #3
    Member andix's Avatar
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    Re: #&*(#@! dust

    the obvious answer is an industrial duster spray indeed. look for those bigger cans with a trigger - a green trigger as far as I can remember, name doesn't come to me right now but it has to say "industrial" on it.

    then use one of those medical clear plastic tubes instead of the stock tube that comes with the can, as you are supposed NOT to tilt the can while dusting. tilting means propellant comes out and stains your subject (or does other nasty things to it, as it tends to attack plastic and lens coating). with the tube you can direct the air wherever you want without actually moving the can.

    the only drawback - it gets depleted pretty quick. and at CAD 19.99 it may be an expensive solution, but quite enough for the occasional watch photographer. if you want to go big scale, use an airbrush compressor.
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  5. #4
    Member gpjoe's Avatar
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    Re: #&*(#@! dust

    GuySie - Thanks for the suggestion. I had already tried the clone tool on one of my pics. It works, but can be very time consuming considering the number of dust flecks on the watch face. It is certainly helpful for a few pieces of dust here and there. The dust was especially noticeable with my JOA Luminor homage with the large black dial because of the size and obvious contrast. The light colored, textured dial of my Omega DeVille in the pic below is much more forgiving. I didn't do a thing to this shot, other than size it.

    andix - I am going to try the obvious canned air solution, though I do have an air brush and compressor that I can try first. The canned air is more practical since I can keep it in close proximity to my 'studio'.

    Anyway, as promised the picture of my vintage Omega. I am pretty pleased for having just started out with watch photography. I prefer a point and shoot for it's ease in using the macro setting. This was taken with my Cannon SX110 IS, in aperture priority mode:


  6. #5

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    Re: #&*(#@! dust

    thats a nice one


    Quote Originally Posted by gpjoe View Post
    GuySie - Thanks for the suggestion. I had already tried the clone tool on one of my pics. It works, but can be very time consuming considering the number of dust flecks on the watch face. It is certainly helpful for a few pieces of dust here and there. The dust was especially noticeable with my JOA Luminor homage with the large black dial because of the size and obvious contrast. The light colored, textured dial of my Omega DeVille in the pic below is much more forgiving. I didn't do a thing to this shot, other than size it.

    andix - I am going to try the obvious canned air solution, though I do have an air brush and compressor that I can try first. The canned air is more practical since I can keep it in close proximity to my 'studio'.

    Anyway, as promised the picture of my vintage Omega. I am pretty pleased for having just started out with watch photography. I prefer a point and shoot for it's ease in using the macro setting. This was taken with my Cannon SX110 IS, in aperture priority mode:


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