Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

Thread: Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

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  1. #1
    Member cleef16's Avatar
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    Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

    I'll try to keep it simple and to the point. I have a Canon EOS 1000D (which I believe was a sort of entry-level DSLR) with 18-55mm lens and NO other pieces of equipment usually required for such shots.

    1. I know that probably the most important aspect of Lume shots is having a tripod to keep your camera steady. I would like to know if there are cheap and short tripods that can be used and placed on a table, on the ground, etc.
    2. What are the settings that I must use for Lume shots (try to dumb it down as possible as you can, so far I take all my shots on the setting "P", whatever that means, and I am VERY pleased with the results, not to brag) ? I know it has to do with ISO (which I don't know what it is) and exposure and all that kind of stuff...
    3. Do you use a photo tent or just take the watch to a dark place/wait for the night ?
    4. Is there a certain lens or filter that I should buy to use for such Lume shots ?
    5. If I've missed something I should also know please share it...

    If you're going to tell me to google this or read the manual or whatever, please refrain from replying. I'd rather have someone that understands all this just answer my questions straight forward.

    Your replies will be much appreciated.

    Thanks in advance.

    Here's one of my latest shots (not bragging) which I say is pretty alright (sans my hand...).

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    Last edited by cleef16; February 21st, 2016 at 09:45.

  2. #2
    Member mharris660's Avatar
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    Re: Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

    cheapest thing in the world is a bean bag. Gets the camera right down to the watches level. With that said there are many good tripod choices. I always look for tripods that have legs that can "splay" out to almost ground level. As far as Lume shots. Low ISO. ISO used to mean film sensitivity to light, the higher ISO number the better the film handled low light. In the digital world it means the same, the higher you set the ISO the lower light you can use. There is a trade off though, it's called noise. The noise at high ISO is seen as blotchy squares and "smearing" image quality. You don't want that.<br>
    <br>
    Here are your settings, low ISO, 100 or 200. Tripod or bean bag. Manual focus. Pre-focus on the face of the watch in the light, turn off the light and shoot manual settings at around 10 seconds at 5.6 on your lens, that's the aperture setting, ie the lens opening that determines how much light is allowed in and controls the depth of field. That's the in and out of focus areas, in Japan they like to call it bokah.<br>
    <br>
    If you had a faster lens, say a 50mm f1.8 lens you could shoot at a little faster shutter speed. If you first shot is dark then shoot 15 secs, 25 seconds, work up in shutter speed until you get the image you want. Here is another really important tip. Learn wher ein your camera settings to delay the shutter release when you push the button of get a remote trigger. When you touch the camera to push the shutter you cause movement. That movement shows up as blur is a slow shutter speed photo. In your settings you will have a timer setting. What that does is give you 5 or 8 seconds I believe after you push the shutter release. This allows the camera to stabilize before the camera fires the shot.<br>
    <br>
    Once you're manually pre-focused in the light, switch off the lights for a room that is as dark as possible, timer set, camera shutter speed set, push the button. You'll here it fire, turn the light on, check the results. If to light faster shutter speed, if too dark slower shutter speed. Keep a flash light handy.<br>
    <br>
    Also, if you want to really get great shots I think you said Nikon? The Nikon 60mm macro lens is a fast f2.8 with amazing optics. One of the best made for close up work.<br>
    <br>
    <img src="https://forums.watchuseek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7146986&amp;stc=1" attachmentid="7146986" alt="" id="vbattach_7146986" class="previewthumb"><img src="https://forums.watchuseek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7146994&amp;stc=1" attachmentid="7146994" alt="" id="vbattach_7146994" class="previewthumb"><img src="https://forums.watchuseek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7147002&amp;stc=1" attachmentid="7147002" alt="" id="vbattach_7147002" class="previewthumb">
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    Last edited by mharris660; February 21st, 2016 at 10:44.

  3. #3
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    Re: Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

    sort of the above, but try this:

    no tripod needed. just set the camera on the table. set your watch on the table

    Set the camera to M, this means Manual, which means you must set the Aperture and Shutter manually, this is done by scrolling the thumb wheel (you must also press a button on the back and use the scroll wheel to change the either the shutter or aperture, I forget which)

    Turn off the auto focus and focus manually. The cheaper/less expensive DSLRs cannot focus well in the dark. Put a blanket over camera and watch. if you have charged the lume, try shooting it at something like f5.6 @ 1/10 second. Adjust shutter speed (or aperture) up or down to get the exposure you want.

    The shorter exposure, you will just get the lume, the longer your exposure will start to reveal the watch.

    Change locations, adjust, and repeat
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  5. #4
    Member cleef16's Avatar
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    Re: Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

    It's a Canon. I was going to say that resting the camera on an object would be out of the question since I tried that, but that's a fantastic advice on setting a small timer for the camera button (I believe I know where to find that in my settings, fortunately). Keep the advice coming.

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    Re: Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

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    real world:

    hand held ISO 2500 f5.6 @ 1/10 adjust as needed

    remember you can knock the ISO down by slowing down the shutter i.e. ISO 100 would need about 3-4 seconds.
    Last edited by jideta; February 22nd, 2016 at 03:29.
    I take pictures too...
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  7. #6
    Member cleef16's Avatar
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    Re: Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

    I don't think we can see the picture... :s

  8. #7
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    Re: Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

    Manual mode switch shutter speed to bulb, Iso 100 large as an aperture as your lens can get. Delay for a couple seconds so you don't have any blurring since you don't have a remote shutter switch.


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  9. #8
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    Re: Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

    Everyone has given good advice. Using the timer is important. If you end up with some sort of remote trigger in the future use the mirror lock up selection. When the mirror comes up it slaps the camera and makes it shake, this will cause issues with short-to-medium-length long exposure photos in the long run, but I wouldn't worry about it at this stage.
    Next is to make sure that your black space noise reduction is turned on. I forget exactly what it is called, but there is a setting that will re-expose the sensor with the mirror down and shutter closed for the same amount of time as your first photo, then the camera will combine the two images and take a lot of noise out of the blacks. If you ever get to exposures in the minute range this is critical due to sensor heating, blah blah blah I'm sure you don't care -- just turn it on and know that any long exposure will be doubled.

  10. #9
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    Re: Amateur with DSLR needs help with Lume shots

    Get your ISO as low as possible, it makes the picture quality the best. Keep in mind that the lighting must be compensated by external light or your shutter speed. If you have slower shutter make sure you have a tripod.

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