1877 Fusee?

Thread: 1877 Fusee?

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Member Allen.rkc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    14

    1877 Fusee?

    Hello again. Just wanted to say thanks for helpful comments in regards to my Waltham. Now on to new things her are some photos of my Fusee. I hate to say that my friend is wrong but I think he was way off the mark on the age. Ive checked the hall marks and it dates to 1877. He said he thought it had been re-cased, not too sure about that. The case # is 2123 but the movement reads #2725. Both are marked C Strickland. Love the fact that they even put the address on it 45 Park Street London on the movement. None the less, I could give a dang that its not 18th cent. Its a family heirloom that what counts to me.
    I saw a post about someone traveling to France and asked for advice, thought I might try the same. I will be going to Moscow in a couple of weeks and thought I would keep an eye out.
    Now I am also on the hunt for a Ball Cleavland Railroad watch.... unfortunately to replace my grandfathers that was stolen years ago. That would have been nice to have. My grandfather was one of the last steam engineers.









    http://i1205.photobucket.com/albums/...g?t=1305692934

  2. #2
    Member AbslomRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Canada
    Posts
    5,315

    Re: 1877 Fusee?

    The date seems right to me; it wouldn't have been common to recase watches like this. I'm guessing it's a lever escapement? Not a lot of jewels in it, fairly plain finish; a good example of a common watch made in the twilight of the British watchmaking era.

    Not sure how common lever escapments would have been in the 18th century; it was only invented around 1760, and watchmakers tend to be slow to adopt new technology.
    My growing collection of "affordable" vintages: http://www.abslomrob.com

  3. #3
    Member Allen.rkc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    14

    Re: 1877 Fusee?

    Quote Originally Posted by AbslomRob View Post
    The date seems right to me; it wouldn't have been common to recase watches like this. I'm guessing it's a lever escapement? Not a lot of jewels in it, fairly plain finish; a good example of a common watch made in the twilight of the British watchmaking era.

    Not sure how common lever escapments would have been in the 18th century; it was only invented around 1760, and watchmakers tend to be slow to adopt new technology.
    Thats what I thought. But as far as it being a lever lever escapement, I dont know. Embarrassing to say but I'm not really sure what an escapement is =-/ I think my parents have given me a curse, now I find myself wanting to add to my little collection. Much to learn though

  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member trim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    3,814

    Re: 1877 Fusee?

    Yes it is a lever fusee. You can see the banking pins top right of the balance wheel.

    7 Jewels, which was fine at the time. It is a nice but not flash period piece.

  6. #5
    Member Allen.rkc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    14

    Re: 1877 Fusee?

    Quote Originally Posted by trim View Post
    Yes it is a lever fusee. You can see the banking pins top right of the balance wheel.

    7 Jewels, which was fine at the time. It is a nice but not flash period piece.
    Thanks trim, I was unsure how many jewels it has. Even for being a fairly plain piece, I am alway amazed at the small detail work. I find that it is the movement that catches my eye with pocket watches. By the way, what metal is the movement made of?

    I'm headed to Moscow in a few weeks, any suggestions on what to keep an eye out for?

  7. #6
    Member trim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    3,814

    Re: 1877 Fusee?

    Brass, with mercury gilded brass (fire gilt). Your balance though I believe is a gold alloy. Radger would know exactly I am sure.

    A 7J watch can be a perfectly fine time keeper, all the essentials are covered. At this time there were NO synthetic jewels, so each jewel had to be dug out of the ground in some far off place like Burma. Nothing cheap about 7J watches back then. Your watch is an early machine made ebauche and then finely hand finished by he watchmaker. The scrollwork on the cock is all hand done for example.

  8. #7
    Member Allen.rkc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    14

    Re: 1877 Fusee?

    Quote Originally Posted by trim View Post
    Brass, with mercury gilded brass (fire gilt). Your balance though I believe is a gold alloy. Radger would know exactly I am sure.

    A 7J watch can be a perfectly fine time keeper, all the essentials are covered. At this time there were NO synthetic jewels, so each jewel had to be dug out of the ground in some far off place like Burma. Nothing cheap about 7J watches back then. Your watch is an early machine made ebauche and then finely hand finished by he watchmaker. The scrollwork on the cock is all hand done for example.
    Thanks for the great insight on my watch. Nice to know that there are people with this kind of knowledge. I will keep an eye out while in Russia. Thanks again and I'm sure you will see more questions from me as they arise

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •