75 Years Ago Tomorrow
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  1. #1
    Member Tick Talk's Avatar
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    75 Years Ago Tomorrow

    Very few veterans are left to give their first-hand accounts of June 6th, 1944, but acquiring this watch some years ago provided ample motivation for research and I'd like to share the story with you.

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    With HS2 engraved on the back and a Broad Arrow symbol on the enamel dial, watch 9409 is quickly identified as a Royal Navy navigation chronometer. Inside resides what may be the prettiest version of V&C's classic Chronometre Royal movement, resplendent in Geneva stripes and rhodium plating. Timekeeping standards were quite onerous for these watches; under 1 second per 24 hours.

    The Royal Maritime Museum at Greenwich still holds records of chronometer watches and provided me with a copy of 9409s ledger. The watch was purchased by HM Government in 1943 but remained in storage until 1945, so clearly it wasn't a participant on D-Day. However, the ships and establishments where it saw service subsequently were very active on that fateful day.

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    CSO Saltcoats remained a mystery for several months, baffling even Royal Navy veterans. However, the trail eventually led to the super-secret "Y Service" of British General Communications Headquarters. CSO's or Composite Signals Organizations were listening posts tasked with intercepting German communications and sending them on to Station X, Bletchley Park, for decryption. Saltcoats was strategically located on the Scottish coast for monitoring North Sea traffic.

    9409s next assignment was also a puzzle but easier solved thanks to an essay by Horance Macaulay on the few Fighter Direction Tenders, or FDTs, upon which the success of D-Day depended. Converted from LST landing craft, these top-secret radar vessels were parked off shore for the invasion, to detect enemy aircraft and direct their interception by allied planes.

    Ironically, the FDT's radar systems were developed from captured German equipment. The concept of radar vessels was first used by the Allies during the landings on Sicily, which proved so successful that four ships were constructed for Normandy. FDT 217 carried a compliment of 100 Navy and 176 Air Force personnel. She was stationed off the beaches of Sword, Juno and Gold on D-Day and remained for seventeen days before withdrawing. 217 was undergoing a refit for the anticipated invasion of Japan when the atomic bombs ended that war.

    Leading Air Craftsman Smith serving on FDT 217 on D-Day recorded these observations years later:

    "At 3:45 the action station alarms went and everyone went to their stations. Flares were dropping in several places making it light as day. A terrific barrage was put up by the seaborne batteries. Tracer bullets in the thousands shot out. Rockets went up making an unearthly screech and burst in the air like the sound of a thousand giant fireworks. The rockets when they burst looked like red hot snakes wriggling about.

    For miles the air was alive, the noise was deafening, but even so we could hear through this pandemonium the steady throb of aircraft engines as they passed overhead. Shell splinters and shrapnel was falling all around the ship and hitting the sides like hailstones. And then crash! crash! two shells dropped somewhere not too close but quite near enough. The ship gave a shudder from stem to stern and then was steady again."


    9409s last active service was aboard the Destroyer Escort HMS Southdown. With a compliment of 146 officers and men, these small fast ships were intended for anti-submarine duties and general protection of the Allied convoys crossing the Atlantic. Southdown earned battle honours in the North Sea and Normandy.

    Chronometer watch 9409 was placed in storage in 1946 and surplussed in 1961, when it entered the collectors market and eventually my cabinet. I feel privileged to be able to share its story on this very special day.
    Tick Talk says, "A watch in the hand is worth two on the wrist"

  2. #2
    Member SilkeN's Avatar
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    Re: 75 Years Ago Tomorrow

    Thank you a lot Tick Talk for this outstanding presentation of an outstanding pocket watch and her hole working life. We see: HS2 isn't always just HS2. THe super-secret "Y Service" of British General Communications Headquarters seems to know a ot about watches as well. I did not even know that the military had something like watches for special cases that were spared until the crucial moment. I am happy for you that you have found such a special historical watch for your VC collection.

    Thank you for sharing in remembering of the D-Day
    Silke
    Last edited by SilkeN; 1 Week Ago at 22:54.
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    That's what I think about today:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vlUGeY7MWVo

  3. #3
    Member bsshog40's Avatar
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    Re: 75 Years Ago Tomorrow

    Very cool!
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  5. #4
    Member Tick Talk's Avatar
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    Re: 75 Years Ago Tomorrow

    Here is a picture of FDT 216, courtesy of the Imperial War Museum. It was the only one lost during the war when torpedoed in July of 1944. It actually flipped upside-down due to the above decks radar equipment making it rather top-heavy. Five RAF personnel were lost, which was pretty low considering it happened at 1 am.

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    Feel free to add any recollections from this day of your relatives who served. I know many veterans were reluctant to talk afterwards but I'm sure there are some who remember grandad's stories...
    guspech750 and SunnyOrange like this.
    Tick Talk says, "A watch in the hand is worth two on the wrist"

  6. #5
    Member Tick Talk's Avatar
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    Any model makers out there?

    Looking at the cabinet, I'm reminded that Normandy is a big part of my model collection. Anyone one else enjoy this hobby?

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    Tick Talk says, "A watch in the hand is worth two on the wrist"

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