Another identification job for you talented lot

Thread: Another identification job for you talented lot

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  1. #1
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    Another identification job for you talented lot

    I've finally taken some pics of another watch I'd love some help identifying! This one was in for service (I really like it) so I didn't have a chance until now.

    The dial reads "LANCO 17 Jewels Incabloc Swiss", and of course I know what that means I even have a rudimentary history of Langendorf under my belt, but I'd love more info.

    The caseback reads "Stainless Steel Swiss Made Superwaterproof Incabloc" around the outer edge, and "20 ATU 1006-10" in the center.

    The movement reads "LANCO Watch INC Swiss Seventeen Jewels Unadjusted" and is signed DWQ, which I understand is the Langendorf/LANCO import code.

    Now that I've typed all that out, it looks like I've really done a lot of the work already... But I'd love any insight anyone has into this piece. It's running great (now that I put a small fortune into repairs!) and I love the sound of it. The chronograph seems to skip ahead to 4 or 5 seconds whenever you start it from zero, but runs accurately and doesn't skip when you start it from a non-zero position. I don't know what that's about but I am going to have my watchmaker take another look - seems like something he should have caught during the overhaul.

    Thanks!
    Jon
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    Last edited by jawn101; January 21st, 2010 at 05:04. Reason: Typo

  2. #2
    Member Marrick's Avatar
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    Re: Another identification job for you talented lot

    Very nice watch.

    It looks like a Landeron 149 to me, but I have been known to get these things wrong :

    http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-...k&Landeron_149

    Edit: Read the post further down by Roland Ranfft to see what it really is.
    Last edited by Marrick; January 22nd, 2010 at 10:21. Reason: Correction
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects."

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  3. #3
    Member timesofplenty's Avatar
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    Re: Another identification job for you talented lot

    Great looking watch! You probably know already but it is worth mentioning, considering the cost to service a chrono: the gaskets in these pushers weren't the greatest when new, so it is likely that they aren't reliable now.

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  5. #4
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    Re: Another identification job for you talented lot

    Quote Originally Posted by timesofplenty View Post
    Great looking watch! You probably know already but it is worth mentioning, considering the cost to service a chrono: the gaskets in these pushers weren't the greatest when new, so it is likely that they aren't reliable now.
    Thanks for the compliment! I did know that, but I wasn't planning to take the "superwaterproof" marking at face value after 40 years I'm just hoping I can get the watchmaker's warranty to cover fixing that skipping chrono.

  6. #5
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    Re: Another identification job for you talented lot

    Quote Originally Posted by Marrick View Post
    Very nice watch.

    It looks like a Landeron 149 to me, but I have been known to get these things wrong :

    http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-...k&Landeron_149
    That definitely does look like the same movement, on a different angle. Thanks for the tip! Encouraging that Wakmann would use it too.

  7. #6
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    Re: Another identification job for you talented lot

    Quote Originally Posted by jawn101 View Post
    That definitely does look like the same movement, on a different angle. Thanks for the tip! Encouraging that Wakmann would use it too.
    Nice chrono! Looks rather sixties-ish to me. The skip is normal for a horizontal clutch chronograph movement but 4-5 seconds is rather too much. Should be more like up to 0.5 seconds. I suspect that the brake on the chrono centre wheel is too loose - it probably releases the wheel too early before the clutch wheel sets in.

    Hartmut Richter

  8. #7
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    Re: Another identification job for you talented lot

    Quote Originally Posted by Hartmut Richter View Post
    Nice chrono! Looks rather sixties-ish to me. The skip is normal for a horizontal clutch chronograph movement but 4-5 seconds is rather too much. Should be more like up to 0.5 seconds. I suspect that the brake on the chrono centre wheel is too loose - it probably releases the wheel too early before the clutch wheel sets in.

    Hartmut Richter
    Thank you for that input! I will actually print this post and bring it to the shop with me this afternoon. For what it's worth, there seems to be a variance in how far it skips from zero based on how quickly I depress the start pusher. If I push very slowly, the skip is much more pronounced. If I push quickly, the skip is less - but in all cases it is at least three seconds.

  9. #8
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    Re: Another identification job for you talented lot

    Quote Originally Posted by Hartmut Richter View Post
    Nice chrono! Looks rather sixties-ish to me. The skip is normal for a horizontal clutch chronograph movement but 4-5 seconds is rather too much. Should be more like up to 0.5 seconds. I suspect that the brake on the chrono centre wheel is too loose - it probably releases the wheel too early before the clutch wheel sets in.

    Hartmut Richter
    Hartmut - THANK YOU! Your advice turned out to be correct, and my watchmaker is correcting the issue right now. If anyone is still interested in a few days, I'll update again and let you know how it went.

  10. #9
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    Re: Another identification job for you talented lot

    Hi there,

    have a closer look, it is a Landeron 248:
    http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-...k&Landeron_248

    Differences are sometimes nearly invisible, and in fact many parts are
    interchangable between many of these calibres, and you often find a mix
    between several generations.

    The reason is simple: Dubois-Depraz delivered chrono kits to C. Hahn
    (Landeron), who screwed them on movements after his preference. And if
    parts were modified but remained interchangable, they were probably not
    separately stored.

    A striking example: Jon's watch from ca. 1970 has still the clutch lever
    from 1939. And this is quite common: 1970 Landeron stopped the
    production, and this was likely the first time they reached the bottom of
    the clutch-lever box.

    Anyway, I can't guarantee the right lever compositions in my archive,
    but I try my best to illustrate the "official" assemblies.

    Regards, Roland Ranfft

  11. #10
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    Re: Another identification job for you talented lot

    Quote Originally Posted by Roland Ranfft View Post
    Hi there,

    have a closer look, it is a Landeron 248:
    http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-...k&Landeron_248

    Differences are sometimes nearly invisible, and in fact many parts are
    interchangable between many of these calibres, and you often find a mix
    between several generations.

    The reason is simple: Dubois-Depraz delivered chrono kits to C. Hahn
    (Landeron), who screwed them on movements after his preference. And if
    parts were modified but remained interchangable, they were probably not
    separately stored.

    A striking example: Jon's watch from ca. 1970 has still the clutch lever
    from 1939. And this is quite common: 1970 Landeron stopped the
    production, and this was likely the first time they reached the bottom of
    the clutch-lever box.

    Anyway, I can't guarantee the right lever compositions in my archive,
    but I try my best to illustrate the "official" assemblies.

    Regards, Roland Ranfft
    Wow, fabulous information and straight from a celebrity! Thank you for clarifying the movement information and for all that background. I love knowing those kind of little bits.

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