Benrus Dial-o-rama vs. Bulova spaceview

Thread: Benrus Dial-o-rama vs. Bulova spaceview

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    31

    Benrus Dial-o-rama vs. Bulova spaceview

    I have narrowed my choices on my next watch purchase between the Benrus Dial-o-rama or the Bulova spaceview. I was wondering if anyone here has experience with either? Or anyother cool vintage watches that are available for under $300. I'm new to this forum and can't figure out how to post pics, but here are some websites with pictures of the watches I'm looking at.

    http://crazywatches.w.interia.pl/pho...dialorama.html

    http://crazywatches.w.interia.pl/pho..._accutron.html

  2. #2
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Great Lakes - USofA
    Posts
    18,156

    Re: Benrus Dial-o-rama vs. Bulova spaceview

    Quote Originally Posted by jolowe86 View Post
    I have narrowed my choices on my next watch purchase between the Benrus Dial-o-rama or the Bulova spaceview. I was wondering if anyone here has experience with either? Or anyother cool vintage watches that are available for under $300. I'm new to this forum and can't figure out how to post pics, but here are some websites with pictures of the watches I'm looking at.

    http://crazywatches.w.interia.pl/pho...dialorama.html

    http://crazywatches.w.interia.pl/pho..._accutron.html

    One of the problems you have with Spaceviews is folks who have replaced regular Accutron dials with 'spaceview' crystals to make them look like Spaceviews. This looks to me like one such watch.

    I think the Accutron 218s are better watches.
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  3. #3
    Member JohnF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Oberstedten, Germany
    Posts
    9,651

    Re: Benrus Dial-o-rama vs. Bulova spaceview

    Hi -

    From a collectibles standpoint, the Benrus is a more interesting acquisition, as Bulova Spaceviews are quite common, while the Benrus is significantly rarer. Given the fact that the Accutron movement's viability is limited by the availability of spare parts - you'd be hard pressed, for instance, to find a watchmaker who would even be able to make the 320-tooth indexing wheel if one couldn't be found (to make things worse, it's made of a special alloy to reduce wear, and is not easy to machine), meaning that you're more dependent on the availability of spare parts than you would be with the Benrus.

    Just my 2 cents: this is the major reason I haven't acquired any sort of tuning-fork watch (yet: if the right one comes along...Hmmmm).

    JohnF
    コスト下げ やる気も一緒に 下げられる


  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member Ray MacDonald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Almonte ON Canada
    Posts
    23,771

    Re: Benrus Dial-o-rama vs. Bulova spaceview

    Have to agree with John as well.
    Vintage watches are always at the mercy of available parts, but if you collect Accutrons you also have to know where to get them fixed. Watchmakers that specialize in these old hummers are even rarer than regular watchmakers.
    Bulova is still in business, but their service departments won't usually fix an Accutron. They tend to want to replace the movement with quartz if they can.
    Add to that the battery issues (the old mercury cells are not available so you have to kludge in something else) and I think I'll stick with regular ticking stuff.
    Accutron collectors may differ in their opinions.

    There are fathers who do not love their children; there is no grandfather who does not adore his grandson. ~ Victor Hugo

  6. #5
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Great Lakes - USofA
    Posts
    18,156

    Re: Benrus Dial-o-rama vs. Bulova spaceview

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray MacDonald View Post
    Have to agree with John as well.
    Vintage watches are always at the mercy of available parts, but if you collect Accutrons you also have to know where to get them fixed. Watchmakers that specialize in these old hummers are even rarer than regular watchmakers.
    Bulova is still in business, but their service departments won't usually fix an Accutron. They tend to want to replace the movement with quartz if they can.
    Add to that the battery issues (the old mercury cells are not available so you have to kludge in something else) and I think I'll stick with regular ticking stuff.
    Accutron collectors may differ in their opinions.
    I am a collector of watches that represent quantum leaps of accuracy improvement. So this problem is well known to me...

    Almost any watchmaker can fix my Longines Accu-Chron (the last mechanical to be the most accurate watch). But my Bulova Accutrons or Accuquartz (the last and most Accutron) or Omega f300 (the vastly improved Swiss tuning fork) or Omega Electroquartz (the first quartz... based on a tuning fork) or Girard Perregeaux Calibre 310 (the first modern quartz) are all fixable only by specialists. Even Omega won't fix their really old quartz anymore as this current thread in HEQ indicates.

    So what. I used to collect vintage cars (and still have too many of them). But I always knew there would reach a point where the car would become a roller (looks nice but only rolls around under people pushing power )

    That doesn't keep me from enjoying them while they work. The same for watches. And the watches stick around... they don't have much scrap value and are easy to store

    The nice thing is, once the quartz evolved past using tuning forks, they become almost indestructible. My highly jeweled Eta quartz movements should last for many centuries (unless the battery leaks!)... a lot longer than I expect my mechanicals (or me!) to be viable.

    BTW... you can get Accutron batteries ... look for ACCUCELL on eBay.
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  7. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    31

    Re: Benrus Dial-o-rama vs. Bulova spaceview

    Wow, thanks for all your feedback. I hadn't really considered the fixing aspect of old watches:oops:. Does anyone know much about Benrus's movements? Thanks.

  8. #7
    Member Ray MacDonald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Almonte ON Canada
    Posts
    23,771

    Re: Benrus Dial-o-rama vs. Bulova spaceview

    My highly jeweled Eta quartz movements should last for many centuries (unless the battery leaks!)... a lot longer than I expect my mechanicals (or me!) to be viable.
    It's going to be difficult for the two of us to prove this one way or the other since quartz is relatively new in the timekeeping biz. But my 1981 Omega is still working fine so 30 years is not out of the question at least. I don't know if mine would still be repairable by Omega or not. It's cal. 1370.
    The problem is that quartz today has an atmosphere of disposability about it, similar to the way Timex was viewed in the 1950s and 60s. I wonder if they are building them to last. The jewels shouldn't be a major concern since the gear tension is pretty low. But I wonder about the circuitry.
    As I write this I look across the room at my 1883 Hampden. I wonder if its original owner would have guessed it'd be still be running 125 years later?

    There are fathers who do not love their children; there is no grandfather who does not adore his grandson. ~ Victor Hugo

  9. #8
    Member Ray MacDonald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Almonte ON Canada
    Posts
    23,771

    Re: Benrus Dial-o-rama vs. Bulova spaceview

    As far as I know Benrus is OK. They have been out of business for a while so parts could be a concern. But that's always the situation with vintage anyway. I have a 1951 Benrus that only needed a cleaning.
    Mainsprings and balance staffs make up most of the problems with old watches, and it should still be possible to get those. If wheels or pallet forks are needed, well...
    You always have to consider repairs with vintage, sad to say. Bulova mechanical is one of the best to get parts for so should be high on any beginning collector's list.

    There are fathers who do not love their children; there is no grandfather who does not adore his grandson. ~ Victor Hugo

  10. #9
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Great Lakes - USofA
    Posts
    18,156

    The lifetime of quartz watches

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray MacDonald View Post
    It's going to be difficult for the two of us to prove this one way or the other since quartz is relatively new in the timekeeping biz. But my 1981 Omega is still working fine so 30 years is not out of the question at least. I don't know if mine would still be repairable by Omega or not. It's cal. 1370.
    The problem is that quartz today has an atmosphere of disposability about it, similar to the way Timex was viewed in the 1950s and 60s. I wonder if they are building them to last. The jewels shouldn't be a major concern since the gear tension is pretty low. But I wonder about the circuitry.
    As I write this I look across the room at my 1883 Hampden. I wonder if its original owner would have guessed it'd be still be running 125 years later?
    The gear train is just a gear train... but, as you point out, in quartz, it is under a lot less stress. Eta's higher end (flatline) quartz are designed to be disassembled and repaired like any of its mechanicals... but it shouldn't need it for a very long time if it is highly jeweled like most are. (Seiko has gotten away with no jewels... but the Japanese don't come from a tradition of long lived movements so probably don't think about this much.)

    The circuitry is really only a quartz crystal and (usually) one integrated circuit module. Quartz crystals are very durable. The single module is a pretty simple one that isn't really state of the art anymore.

    The only things that are likely to kill these modules are
    1) the random cosmic ray (!) -- a gamma ray can create new conductive paths inside the chip.

    or 2) a strange power surge -- they also cause shorts in the chip. But the only power source is a battery and they tend to loose voltage rather than surge to high voltage.
    The other main killer of quartz is destruction of the signal paths on the printed circuit board. The most common reasons for this are
    1) acid leakage from a dead battery

    2) mechanical shock causing distortion of the board (this will probably kill the gear train too)

    3) improper repair... 'tourists' can kill anything
    Most manufacturers will just replace a quartz movement with another quartz movement... it's so much cheaper than fixing them. They would probably do this with mechanicals too if they thought they could get away with it.

    But the better quartz movements can be repaired. Check the Eta Technical Documentation for their quartz movements... they even give parts lists, disassembly and assembly instructions. The manufacturing documentation gives electrical tests for the electronic parts.

    I have 45 year old computers that still work... the only problem usually is the things that move like disks and cooling fans ... oh, and dirty switches...
    Last edited by Eeeb; January 23rd, 2008 at 02:37. Reason: straightened out tenses...
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  11. #10
    Member Ray MacDonald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Almonte ON Canada
    Posts
    23,771

    Re: The lifetime of quartz watches

    I have 45 year old computers that still work... the only problem usually is the things that move like disks and cooling fans ... oh, and dirty switches...
    That would take us back to 1963. I remember seeing some of these units (IBM/Burroughs). They were card reader based, had some sort of DMP output. I think the IC was coming in by then, I know transistors were around for sure. And you have some of these that work?

    There are fathers who do not love their children; there is no grandfather who does not adore his grandson. ~ Victor Hugo

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •