A couple more vintages to ID!

Thread: A couple more vintages to ID!

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    238

    A couple more vintages to ID!

    I found a couple more fascinating vintage pieces in my collection that I'd love some more help identifying!

    There were a bunch of small, small, small (around 15mm) ladies' style quartz watches from Pulsar, Seiko and Timex - not terribly interesting, but one or two might end up in my wife's collection. Is there a name for these sort of watches?

    The two that really stood out were this ultra-small Gruen, and a Timex Electric. I've never seen one of those before.

    The Gruen is nearly microscopic - measures just 10mm wide. The face reads "Gruen 17 Jewels Swiss". The back reads "Gruen Base Metal Bezel St. Steel Back" and the inside of the caseback reads "Cased and Timed in U.S.A. by Gruen Watch Co. 490A 425687" The movement is the tiniest thing I've ever seen, and reads "Gruen Watch Co 673N 17 Jewels Seventeen Swiss Unadjusted." The look of this watch is really unique - seems to be like a rice paper textured metal, with a permanently installed band that blends perfectly into the case. The dial has the same texture to it, and the lettering is all black. The photos make it look sort of like the lettering is wavy, but that's just because the camera couldn't figure out what to focus on at this size - it's quite straight on a textured background. The back of the clasp on the band reads "Kestenmade 1/2010K.G.F. U.S.A. St. Steel Back Patent No. 339308.

    Now on to the Timex. I don't have a battery for this one yet, but I assume it uses a movement similar to the Accutron? I don't actually know, but the design of the case suggests a lot of equipment packed inside, more than you'd expect from a quartz. The face reads "Timex Electric Germany 8305006974." The hands and batons are embellished with blue, and the second hand is entirely blue. The look is very cool - I'm afraid the pictures didn't capture the beauty. The dial is textured in a diamond pattern.

    Any help is of course appreciated! I hope sharing these pieces helps repay everyone for their help with identification
    Attached Images Attached Images
















  2. #2
    Zenith Forum Co-moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    16,869

    Re: A couple more vintages to ID!

    The Gruen looks nice. You won't be surprised to know that it has the thinnest watch movement with all parts on one level: the FHF Cal. 59 (or 59-21, if the beat rate is 21600 A/h) - only 9mm across, leaving 1mm for the rest of the case if you measured it accurately:

    http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-...0&2uswk&FHF_59

    Even smaller is the LeCoultre Cal. 101, of course, but that has the movement parts on two levels.

    Hartmut Richter

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ohio, usa
    Posts
    285

    Re: A couple more vintages to ID!

    The size of the Gruen was typical ladies fashion in the 50's and 60's. The Timex electric was quartz, but not a tuning fork like accutron. Benrus made the first electric watch, Timex made them affordable. I to like the many great looking dials on the Timex electrics and have several that caught my fancy.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    St Paul, MN
    Posts
    1,653

    Re: A couple more vintages to ID!

    I believe the term your looking for is cocktail watches.

  6. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    238

    Re: A couple more vintages to ID!

    Thanks to all for the input! It is cool to know there is something unique about that Gruen, being the thinnest single plate movement. It will probably see some wrist time as my wife's job brings her to some very formal events, and her metal of preference is silver.

    Sad to report, however, that the Timex Electric seems to be dead. A new battery failed to resurrect it, and I have been entirely unable to find any way to open the case to examine further. I know a lot of Timex watches are designed to be reliable for as long as they can be, then just be disposed of rather than repaired... that looks like the case here too. Such is life, I fear.

    Thanks again to everyone!

  7. #6
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Great Lakes - USofA
    Posts
    18,122

    Re: A couple more vintages to ID!

    Quote Originally Posted by jawn101 View Post
    Thanks to all for the input! It is cool to know there is something unique about that Gruen, being the thinnest single plate movement. It will probably see some wrist time as my wife's job brings her to some very formal events, and her metal of preference is silver.

    Sad to report, however, that the Timex Electric seems to be dead. A new battery failed to resurrect it, and I have been entirely unable to find any way to open the case to examine further. I know a lot of Timex watches are designed to be reliable for as long as they can be, then just be disposed of rather than repaired... that looks like the case here too. Such is life, I fear.

    Thanks again to everyone!
    Timex did issue electric movement repair manuals. (Indeed, full repair manuals for their entire line.) I have ones for their Model 84 and Model 85 (With Date!!) [Timex's emphasis ]

    When my watchmaker says a movement was not meant to be repaired, I have come to realize what he does not add is "by me."
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  8. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    238

    Re: A couple more vintages to ID!

    LOL - Fabulous statement. I am a very mechanically inclined individual, and am well used to detail work due to many years spent in my basement building microelectronics. However, I've found that even the most delicate silicon component is more forgiving than these watches What I can't figure out is how to get the case open!! I can pop off the little door with the rubber O-ring to get access to the battery, but the rest of the case seems to be one solid piece of steel. The only thing I can figure is that the crystal would need to be removed to allow access from the top down, but I don't know how to do that without damage.

    I did find this link with some movement service manuals - http://www.e-watchmaker.com/reviewtmxelectric.html - but they don't seem to cover the model 69. Oh well!

    Quote Originally Posted by Eeeb View Post
    Timex did issue electric movement repair manuals. (Indeed, full repair manuals for their entire line.) I have ones for their Model 84 and Model 85 (With Date!!) [Timex's emphasis ]

    When my watchmaker says a movement was not meant to be repaired, I have come to realize what he does not add is "by me."

  9. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ohio, usa
    Posts
    285

    Re: A couple more vintages to ID!

    Try the watchmaking forum. They can explain how to open anything.

  10. #9
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Great Lakes - USofA
    Posts
    18,122

    Re: A couple more vintages to ID!

    Here is the repair manual for the movement. I have already sent it to the OP but thought others might need too.

    I took these with my 'droid phone. Sorry for the big blue watermark. The software in free version does that.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •