Cyma restoration
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Thread: Cyma restoration

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  1. #1
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    Cyma restoration

    I was given an early 60's Cyma manual that looked pretty sad and was not working. The crystal was broken and the dial was covered in crud. I have tried cleaning dials unsuccessfully before and discovered that it's fraught with danger. So some very gentle cleaning with steam and a cotton bud removed the majority of the build up and a light polish of the hands got them looking respectable. I found the movement good to work on and after a clean, oil and reassemble it burst into life and is working well. It took me a while to work out where to source a replacement crystal but after some advice I discovered that a Sternkreuz crystal from Cousins would do the trick nicely. A new band and voila it looks great. Just enough patina to retain the old feel but without the gunge that made it sad. Rob Name:  cyma_before_1_zps3280bb0f.jpg
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  2. #2
    Member Addictedtowatches's Avatar
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    Re: Cyma restoration

    Wow good job! Restored to looking near new and its a beauty! Enjoy it.
    --Charlie

    -Citizen -Seiko -Heuer -Steinhart -Bulova -TagHeuer

  3. #3
    Member Marrick's Avatar
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    Re: Cyma restoration

    Fantastic job. Could you elaborate a bit on how you used steam on the dial?
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects."

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  5. #4
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    Re: Cyma restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Marrick View Post
    Fantastic job. Could you elaborate a bit on how you used steam on the dial?
    Glad to. I've made the mistake before of using solvents (isopropyl alcohol or Shellite) which attack the dial coating which for the old watches appears to be a lacquer. So instead I used a steam vaporiser that I use for humidifying the room when I have a chest cold. You could use a kettle but you'd need to be careful not to scald your fingers as steam has a high heat capacity. The advantage of the humidifier is that it puts out a gentle stream of steam but you still need to be careful. I passed the dial across the steam and then used a cotton bud (or cotton tip) to gently wipe the surface. Pass it across multiple times wiping each time and working small areas. For it to work it relies on the crud being water soluble but the steam has enough heat to accelerate the action of dissolving the crud without injuring the paint or lacquer. Like all things it pays to try it on an area that won't be noticeable if it reacts badly. Cheers. Rob
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  6. #5
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    Re: Cyma restoration

    Thanks for the insight on how to use the steam. You've done a superb job.
    Just a question: Is it ok if you pass it through the steam along with the movement? In what way would it affect the latter?
    Regards
    Aashdin
    Time waits for no man.

  7. #6
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    Re: Cyma restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Aashdin View Post
    Thanks for the insight on how to use the steam. You've done a superb job.
    Just a question: Is it ok if you pass it through the steam along with the movement? In what way would it affect the latter?
    Regards
    Aashdin
    Hi Aashdin. The dial is removed from the movement for the cleaning process. Passing the movement through steam will cause corrosion (rust) of the steel parts if the movement is not then dried thoroughly so it is wise to keep it away from any moisture.

  8. #7
    Member HOROLOGIST007's Avatar
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    Re: Cyma restoration

    Nice job
    Congrats and thanks for sharing that tip
    Regards
    NEVER ARGUE WITH AN IDIOT. FIRST THEY WILL DRAG YOU DOWN TO THEIR LEVEL. THEN, THEY WILL BEAT YOU WITH EXPERIENCE.

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