Early Seiko question
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Thread: Early Seiko question

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  1. #1
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    Early Seiko question

    Just trying to find out some more information about early Seiko movements and models. For anyone interested, I've posted a related post in Watchmaking, with a useful link to an article about early Seiko production in it. Here's a picture of one I bought recently, with a fairly disgusting case, but a nice dial – just to set the stage a bit.

    As you can see, this model is designated as a Seiko Super. But they also made many models which were also called Super "S." I can't really see any difference between the two, and was wondering if anyone know if the "S" is significant or not.

    Thoughts?
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    Last edited by Habitant; September 15th, 2017 at 01:25.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Early Seiko question

    Good luck in your quest! The world needs more old Seikos!!!
    Finding simpler info for my '60 Sportsmatic was pretty difficult, so I'm sure it will be even more so with you. I'd say your best bet is to dig around the web* and cross your fingers. Am I allowed to say that? haha
    Lovely little Seiko!
    *I'll play by the rules :)
    Last edited by CC Texas; September 15th, 2017 at 01:47.
    "A watch is ruined, not by time, but by bad handling. To run well it should be wound regularly, cleaned yearly, and, if injured, taken to a competent, practical man. A ​Waltham watch properly cared for will last a lifetime." -American Waltham Watch Co. Catalog (c) 1900
    “When your watch gets out of order you have a choice of two things to do: throw it in the fire or take it to the watch-tinker. The former is the quickest.” -Mark Twain

  3. #3
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    Re: Early Seiko question

    Don't know if you are allowed to… but for what it's worth, I find that a really impossible site to navigate. The best way to search it is to go outside it and see what Google's indexed, rather than rely on their own pretty clumsy search engine. Makes finding info hard/impossible. Hence reverting to home.

    PS I think I'm allowed to replate the case on this one!

    Quote Originally Posted by CC Texas View Post
    Good luck in your quest! The world needs more old Seikos!!!
    Finding simpler info for my '60 Sportsmatic was pretty difficult, so I'm sure it will be even more so with you. I'd say your best bet is to dig around Seikoholics and cross your fingers. Am I allowed to say that? haha
    Lovely little Seiko!
    Last edited by Habitant; September 15th, 2017 at 01:30.
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    Re: Early Seiko question

    Exactly my thoughts about the place!!
    "A watch is ruined, not by time, but by bad handling. To run well it should be wound regularly, cleaned yearly, and, if injured, taken to a competent, practical man. A ​Waltham watch properly cared for will last a lifetime." -American Waltham Watch Co. Catalog (c) 1900
    “When your watch gets out of order you have a choice of two things to do: throw it in the fire or take it to the watch-tinker. The former is the quickest.” -Mark Twain

  6. #5
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    Re: Early Seiko question

    Were you looking for something like this?
    "Super: (Sub-brand) - Seiko's top watch line of the early 1950’s. The Super sub-brand was introduced in 1950 and was the highest selling watch in Japan until the introduction of the Marvel sub-brand in 1956. The Super was made in 8j, 9j, 10j, 11j, 15j and 17j hand-wind versions and also with day and date functions such as the “Auto Dater” and the “Week Dater”. In 1954, a Super would have set you back ¥3,850."
    -From WUS https://forums.watchuseek.com/f281/se...ry-209014.html
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    "A watch is ruined, not by time, but by bad handling. To run well it should be wound regularly, cleaned yearly, and, if injured, taken to a competent, practical man. A ​Waltham watch properly cared for will last a lifetime." -American Waltham Watch Co. Catalog (c) 1900
    “When your watch gets out of order you have a choice of two things to do: throw it in the fire or take it to the watch-tinker. The former is the quickest.” -Mark Twain

  7. #6
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    Re: Early Seiko question

    A rough guess, but ¥3,850 was probably less than $10 USD in 1954.....
    " I like Chiken farming and old clock " --- Anon

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    Re: Early Seiko question

    From Seikoholics: "An interesting reason for these 3 ca. 1930 models; according to Nagao and Mori, Hattori charged 5.80 yen per watch (wholesale) in 1929, but Swiss watches only cost retailers 3 yen per piece."

    According to James Gabraith: "In 1920, 1 JPY was worth about 50 cents. In 1920, 50c could buy a pound of bacon, a pound of coffee or a dozen eggs. So a 100 yen was 50 dollars. According to Inflation Calculator that's roughly $600 in today's money, or 60,000 yen."


    I suspect that there may have been a misplaced decimal place in the original quote. Interesting to see that Japanese watches cost more than Swiss imports in Japan at the time, I thought. Surely down to higher production costs?

    Quote Originally Posted by marks55 View Post
    A rough guess, but ¥3,850 was probably less than $10 USD in 1954.....
    Last edited by Habitant; September 15th, 2017 at 14:00.

  9. #8
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    Re: Early Seiko question

    Quote Originally Posted by Habitant View Post
    According to James Gabraith: "In 1920, 1 JPY was worth about 50 cents. In 1920, 50c could buy a pound of bacon, a pound of coffee or a dozen eggs. So a 100 yen was 50 dollars. According to Inflation Calculator that's roughly $600 in today's money, or 60,000 yen."
    That makes me feel a bit better about what I came up with. Last night I got $586 in today's money, but I converted it so much. hahaha Who knows
    "A watch is ruined, not by time, but by bad handling. To run well it should be wound regularly, cleaned yearly, and, if injured, taken to a competent, practical man. A ​Waltham watch properly cared for will last a lifetime." -American Waltham Watch Co. Catalog (c) 1900
    “When your watch gets out of order you have a choice of two things to do: throw it in the fire or take it to the watch-tinker. The former is the quickest.” -Mark Twain

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