FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248
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  1. #1
    Member milanzmaj's Avatar
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    FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248

    Dear fans, would like to help me about an hour by the year roughly to production and quality to that hour, I bought it at the beauty :)
    Thanks gays
    P.s. will change only his belt and I think that the drawing will be even nicer



    and LANDERONOM cal 248
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  2. #2
    Member milanzmaj's Avatar
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    Re: FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248

    My watches,my love.....



  3. #3
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    Re: FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248

    It looks to be in very nice condition. Just going by the hands and dial style I would think it was made in the 1950's
    A nice brown leather strap would suit it better.
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  5. #4
    Member milanzmaj's Avatar
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    Re: FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248

    Yes :)
    Today come to me and brown leather strap I put today.. :)
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  6. #5
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248

    Great condition! The casing is quite good as is the dial and movement. Very good find from the late 40's to the 60's, I suspect.
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  7. #6
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    Re: FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248

    was the LANDERON CAL. 248 used by breitling??

  8. #7
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    Re: FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248

    I would put this watch into the late 50's, early 60's. Dauphin-type hands were in fashion these days, and Landeron started making 248's around 1955. This watch is in nice shape, by the way.

    I cannot say for sure whether Breitling used Landeron calibres after 1940, but I doubt it. As a matter of fact, Anatole Breitling had sold his chronograph patents to Charles Hahn in the early twenties and Hahn (based at Landeron) supplied chronograph movements to Breitling. When in the thirties the Breitling Patents expired, Breitling took delivery from other firms - mainly Venus and Valjoux. It was only in the late Sixties that Breitling reintroduced own calibers into their higher-rated chronographs.

    Landeron in 1940 had the first chronograph without crown wheel patented and by 1945 practically exclusively manufactured them. Between then and the early 1960s more than 2.5 million movements of the Landeron 48-family were produced. Breitling, to my best knowledge, didn't buy any of them.

    When Breitling introduced chronographs without crown wheels in their catalogues, they sported the Venus 188 caliber, later to become the Valjoux 7730 (and developed into the highly successful 77xx family, including the resilient 7750, still going strong after more than 40 years.)

    So if I were offered a Breitling chronograph with a Landeron caliber without crown wheel, I would be very cautious.
    Last edited by Tomcat1960; June 29th, 2012 at 00:39.
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  9. #8
    Moderator at Large stuffler,mike's Avatar
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    Re: FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248

    Between then and the early 1960s more than 2.5 million movements of the Landeron 48-family were produced. Breitling, to my best knowledge, didn't buy any of them.
    Sorry to correct you but the Landeron 48 was used in an 18k rose-gold Breitling (1949). In 1954 Breiting fitted another chrono with the Landeron 150.
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  10. #9
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    Re: FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248

    Quote Originally Posted by stuffler,mike View Post
    Sorry to correct you but the Landeron 48 was used in an 18k rose-gold Breitling (1949). In 1954 Breiting fitted another chrono with the Landeron 150.
    Well, I wrote "to my best knowledge" These are really rare birds then - are there photographs or other resources?

    Thank you!
    After all's been said and done, there's a lot more said than done...

    Patina: little pieces of history put on old watches and forgotten there by the maker of time

    "Miracles?", he asked. "Forget about miracles. Those who walk on water just know where the stepstones are."

    "Luxury watches - you acquire the right to take care of them, but they remain the property of their manufacturers."
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  11. #10
    Member Tomcat1960's Avatar
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    Re: FULTON LANDERONOM cal 248

    Okay, I checked the web for some additional information on Breitling and Landeron.

    I found this entry in Watch-wiki. It shows a Diver Chronograph marked "Breitling" on dial, case and movement. If this is a frankenwatch, it's one of the better ones , even if the signature on the lid (to me) looks a bit out-of-time.

    I also found a Breitling with L/51 in Haider/Jacobs/Zimmermann, Mechanische Armbandstoppuhren, Chronographen, Vienna, 1988, but this looks a fake to me:

    Name:  Breitling L51 WUS.jpg
Views: 882
Size:  163.1 KB

    Judge yourself... a 40's Breitling with this plain signature on the dial?

    However, this is about it. The one shown here to me looks - umh - 'much refurbished', and the seller has attained some notoriety in continental watch forums All other references I found, express the same doubts as I do regarding Landerons without column wheels in Breitlings.

    Example 1
    Example 2
    Example 3

    (Example 3 explains one possible (but as yet unproven) exception: Wakmann, who ran Breitling's imports to the US in the Fifties and Sixties, were granted the rights to use the name "Breitling" on their watches. However, these chronographs (if any) were built by Gigandet, not Breitling. I have still to see one in order to find out how they were signed on dial, case and movement.)

    "Regular" vintage chronographs equipped with a Landeron-48-family movement usually sell at prices between 150 and 600 €, depending on shape, condition, maintenance history and historic significance. "Breitlings" command, at least in Europe, outrageous sums, even junkers do so. This explains the incentive for fakers - if a "Breitling"-marked dial doubles the value of the watch, who wouldn't think about trying...

    Again: I'm not saying it is impossible. However, I've not seen a convincing one "live" yet and stand by my doubts.

    Note, too, that I refer only to Landerons without column wheel. Breitling in fact built chronographs with Landeron 39, 42 and 52, but they are few and far between, so it seems Landeron was kind of a backup-supplier when demand exceeded the capacity of the Venus- and Valjoux firms during and shortly after WW 2.
    Last edited by Tomcat1960; June 21st, 2012 at 13:40.
    After all's been said and done, there's a lot more said than done...

    Patina: little pieces of history put on old watches and forgotten there by the maker of time

    "Miracles?", he asked. "Forget about miracles. Those who walk on water just know where the stepstones are."

    "Luxury watches - you acquire the right to take care of them, but they remain the property of their manufacturers."
    (Roland Ranfft)

    Now available for your Kindle or Kindle Reader:

    Tracks in a Blizzard - A (German) Christmas Ghost Story

    Check me out on Facebook! / Visit us on Facebook! / Visit us in our living room!

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