General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing
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Thread: General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing

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  1. #1
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    General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing

    I have never purchased or looked into vintage watches before, but a 40 year-old Omega with a 1012 movement caught my eye.
    It's said to have been last serviced this winter, and currently runs at +- 10s.
    Can you advise, even if in very general terms, what to expect with vintage watches of this range and caliber?

    • Will it run roughly at this rate or will it drift dramatically, such as doubling in a year. i.e. +- 20s by next winter.
    • Will it require more frequent servicing to keep running, such as 1yr or 2yr cycles, as opposed to 3yr or 5yr recommended terms for new watches.
    • Will it be much more susceptible to shocks. Such as a desk dive incident rendering it stopped ?

    My only context is with new watches, which I run until they suffer a catastrophic drop or a chrono pusher gets sticky, etc.
    I dont need this purchase to keep its accuracy, but I certainly dont wish to pay a servicing bill every year, or have it go +- 1minute , without having continuous pampering

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Re: General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing

    Hello,
    if as you stated it was serviced recently then it should be good for 5 years or so, then it should need a COA and it should be good for another five, the 1XXX series sometimes gets a bad rap but I think it's a nice reliable movement that should (once serviced) give good service.

    Post some pictures of your potential purchase and we'll look at it for you and see if we can spot anything nasty or untoward, there are some unscrupulous sellers out there.

    Matt
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  3. #3
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    Re: General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing

    thanks for the answer

    im looking at this watch that was recently sold - which is being flipped by its current owner

    https://omegaforums.net/threads/all-...erviced.66979/

    from what i can tell, the pitting around the rear case lip *may* be a big problem.
    clearly its lost its 30m water resistance, but more worryingly is perhaps the easier ingress/egress of moisture will facilitate rapid deterioration of surfaces, spoiling of the lubrication, etc... ?

    im not so much concerned about collectibility, and resale, but rather to have relatively carefree ownership

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  5. #4
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    Re: General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing

    just give it a try, You can sell it even before the next service cycle if it turns out not something You like :)
    Chaos is my focus

  6. #5
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    General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing

    It’s a lot of money just to take a chance (well it is for me) do you actually want an Omega or just a nice vintage watch? There are plenty of great little Watches out there with good movements in (ETA,AS etc) for a fraction of the price. You could possibly try one of those first just to see how you get on.

    Matt


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  7. #6
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    Re: General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing

    Quote Originally Posted by picanhapilot View Post
    thanks for the answer

    im looking at this watch that was recently sold - which is being flipped by its current owner

    https://omegaforums.net/threads/all-...erviced.66979/

    from what i can tell, the pitting around the rear case lip *may* be a big problem.
    clearly its lost its 30m water resistance, but more worryingly is perhaps the easier ingress/egress of moisture will facilitate rapid deterioration of surfaces, spoiling of the lubrication, etc... ?

    im not so much concerned about collectibility, and resale, but rather to have relatively carefree ownership
    The pitting is fairly minor and if the watch was truly serviced recently and in good condition, I don't see any obvious problems, especially if you don't submerge the watch frequently.

    In reading your posts, I'm sensing a different tone than we usually hear from people who are interested in vintage watches, and I'm wondering what is drawing you to this watch. If you're not interested in collectibility and mainly concerned about carefree ownership, why are you considering this watch instead of a vintage-style modern watch, which are quite common these days? After all, you are looking at over-paying for this watch. It's an OK watch, but as mentioned above, it's far from the most desirable of Omega models, and the case is over-polished.
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  8. #7
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    Re: General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing

    Quote Originally Posted by badbackdan View Post
    and I'm wondering what is drawing you to this watch. If you're not interested in collectibility and mainly concerned about carefree ownership, why are you considering this watch instead of a vintage-style modern watch, which are quite common these days? After all, you are looking at over-paying for this watch. It's an OK watch, but as mentioned above, it's far from the most desirable of Omega models, and the case is over-polished.
    Hi

    This was sparked by seeing someone else's example (of a vintage Seamaster ?).

    I am very drawn to the aesthetics of it, and in a specific way: small-mid size, thin edged round case, black dial, block (i.e. non-triangular) markers and hands, domed glass.

    Some modern watches look similar, but not in the exact way I like. Plus being 'vintage' has some romantic appeal. I'm struggling to google exact reference numbers to widen the search, but I think there were more 60s 70s Seamasters in this style than just this De Ville

    Anyway, up to the seller to accept the bid now :)
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  9. #8
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    Re: General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing

    As long as the watch is serviced and not beat on and kept away from water then there is no reason a vintage watch cannot be a daily wear watch.


    The 10xx movement gets a bad rap but I have had watches with that movement in it and these worked well. The key to long watch life is servicing. (even a $10,000 Rolex will run like crap if is run for decades without a service)


    That watch is in nice condition. It is being sold on Omegaforums.net which seems to be ground zero for every snob out there (they whine that a 50 year old Omega has a few scratches on it (I don't know many folks that buy a watch and don't wear it so there will be wear and tear on it)) so the watch is genuine and in good shape or else it (and the seller) will be booted off the forum.

    That said I think you can do better on a serviced Omega if you can sit and wait.


    Are you attracted to the looks of that particular Omega (Deville)or just the style of the watch case? If it is the style of the case then, you don't have to spend big bucks to get an Omega, that was a common style on the 1960's and 1970's. There are loads of other brands out there that look the same. Look at Hamilton, Bulova, Mido, Octo (Missile Master), Seiko (I find Seiko to just as good as the Swiss brands and those 1960's designs they have are classics), Certina and Longines to name a few


    Stay away from plated cases(gold, chrome) and stick with ether solid gold or stainless steel as those age well.


    Good luck

  10. #9
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    Re: General vintage buying advice (70s Omega)...operation, not pricing

    Quote Originally Posted by busmatt View Post
    It’s a lot of money just to take a chance (well it is for me) do you actually want an Omega or just a nice vintage watch? There are plenty of great little Watches out there with good movements in (ETA,AS etc) for a fraction of the price. You could possibly try one of those first just to see how you get on.

    Matt


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    I assumed it's not an issue for OP because I would not even consider simple three-hander stainless omega for $800 myself :)
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