Help Identifying HY Moser Russian/Swiss pocketwatch

Thread: Help Identifying HY Moser Russian/Swiss pocketwatch

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  1. #1
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    Help Identifying HY Moser Russian/Swiss pocketwatch

    Hello, I recently acquire an old pocket watch, is very small and the dial is signed HY Moser Escalape.
    What really calls my attention is that the second hand moves like a quartz watch, it pauses every second, unlike normal mechanical watches, where the second hands moves at a constant speed.
    I tried to find some information in google and it says this brand was founded by a Russian watchmaker that went to live in Switzerland, but I am not sure about the age of this particular watch.

    I would like to know more about this movement, is the first time I see that mechanism. The watch works but the dial is rusty, the case seems to be silver.
    Looks like it's been years since the movement was serviced, so I will have to clean it. I have cleaned and oiled old American pocket watches, but I am not sure on how to proceed with this one.

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  2. #2
    Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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    Re: Help Identifying HY Moser Russian/Swiss pocketwatch

    Congratulations on your watch. I never knew that Moser made something like that. You have what is known as a "jumping second" (springende Sekunde in German) movement. The most famous example is probably the Chezard Cal. 7400 series but that was for wrist watches. The energy from the balance is stored in a small intermediate mechanism and transmitted to the seconds hand only once every second (rather than five times a second, once for each half beat, for a 2.5Hz movement). I am not sure what the rationale is behind this - these days, it would be considered to be negative due to its association with quartz movements but it is still made: Chronoswiss have recently got the rights to such a movement which they will be marketing as "in house". I suppose in the old days, it was just considered as showing the seconds more accurately.

    http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-...k&Chezard_7400

    Hartmut Richter

  3. #3
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    Re: Help Identifying HY Moser Russian/Swiss pocketwatch

    Quote Originally Posted by Hartmut Richter View Post
    Congratulations on your watch. I never knew that Moser made something like that. You have what is known as a "jumping second" (springende Sekunde in German) movement. The most famous example is probably the Chezard Cal. 7400 series but that was for wrist watches. The energy from the balance is stored in a small intermediate mechanism and transmitted to the seconds hand only once every second (rather than five times a second, once for each half beat, for a 2.5Hz movement). I am not sure what the rationale is behind this - these days, it would be considered to be negative due to its association with quartz movements but it is still made: Chronoswiss have recently got the rights to such a movement which they will be marketing as "in house". I suppose in the old days, it was just considered as showing the seconds more accurately.

    bidfun-db Archiv: Uhrwerke: Chezard 7400

    Hartmut Richter
    Very interesting!, I think once serviced it is gonna look great

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  5. #4
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: Help Identifying HY Moser Russian/Swiss pocketwatch

    Rolex had a jumping second too.
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

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