How to buy Vintage

Thread: How to buy Vintage

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  1. #1
    Member black_dog's Avatar
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    Rolling eyes How to buy Vintage

    Merry Christmas all

    I find myself in a bit of a dilemma, I would like to buy a vintage Omega 1950's-60's
    automatic that's original as possible Max $1000.
    So where do you find this little jewel.
    I have looked on ebay but do not have the knowledge to stop me getting burnt and I know this would dissuaded from buying more in the future.
    I could just find a good dealer trust his knowledge and pay the extra mark up for retail.
    On the other hand I feel the hunting and feeling you have rescued an unloved and unappreciated jem is part of the reason I want a vintage in the first place

    Is their watch version of a stray dogs home that can rehome watches that don't get wrist time where you can trust what your buying

    Please be Blunt I hope to keep this watch for many years
    Cheers Black Dog
    “They say a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it's not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.”

  2. #2
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    Re: How to buy Vintage

    There are some general tips in this thread: https://forums.watchuseek.com/f295/ti...ost779219.html

    There's a lot to be wary of with Omega. Because the brand is so popular and more expensive than average, there's plenty of shenanigans surrounding it. You could always ask about a particular watch - PM me a link or two as you narrow them down. Be warned that Constellations are the most often faked or frankened since they're the most desired models. For under $1000 you'll have some nice options. Gold capped and stainless steel Constellation caliber 551/561 chronometers (168.005 with date, 167.005 without... or their earlier counterparts inside 14.3xx cases) sell for right around this price in very nice condition. However, you could get a solid gold Seamaster De Ville or Geneve for the same money with a similar non-chronometer movement like a 562. I wouldn't do a restoration for a first vintage watch. It's usually cheaper to pay the price up front for a mint example. If you do decide to go the project watch route, the most important aspect is the dial. Find the absolute best one you can. Other parts can be replaced with relative ease, but mint dials are hard to come by and expensive when found.

  3. #3
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: How to buy Vintage

    Dennis gives good advice. Let me add buying your first vintage on the open market and expecting to 'do it right and perfect' is akin to expecting to be able to fix your first watch the first time you try.

    Personally I love vintage Omegas but for a first vintage I would buy condition more than brand.
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

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  5. #4
    Member Fantasyvoyager's Avatar
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    Re: How to buy Vintage

    Absolutely right !! condition condition condition, if the dial is in great shape, most of the other parts are fairly routine to pick up.
    Buying a watch in pristine shape is most likely your best bet for first time vintage.
    Don't worry if it has not been serviced, that is a side thought, look for auctions stating the watch runs and stops or runs for a while but fast..so on, the servicing is an expense you will shill out sooner or later on your vintage anyway. I always include the price of servicing a vintage watch in my mind when buying, I don't necessarily just restore Higher end Vintage , but watches that have no real value, but hold an interest to me as well.

  6. #5
    Member black_dog's Avatar
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    Re: How to buy Vintage

    Thank you all

    I have taken on board all your comments and will go for the best possible condition
    although some watch's on ebay look too good to be true condition wise

    Ps. why do some dials look mint and others have a lot of patina discolouration

    Enjoy the holidays
    “They say a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it's not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.”

  7. #6
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    Re: How to buy Vintage

    Quote Originally Posted by black_dog View Post
    Thank you all

    I have taken on board all your comments and will go for the best possible condition
    although some watch's on ebay look too good to be true condition wise

    Ps. why do some dials look mint and others have a lot of patina discolouration

    Enjoy the holidays
    Most of those "mint" dials are probably refinished. If it's an Omega, Longines, JLC, or VC then I could probably tell you in a glance whether it's original or not. Any other brand you'd have to find a collector who's experienced with that manufacturer.

  8. #7
    Member AbslomRob's Avatar
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    Re: How to buy Vintage

    If you're looking for an "unloved and unappreciated gem", stop looking for an Omega. Unless you want to start going door-to-door in an old age home looking for someone who doesn't know how to use the internet and wants to sell their old watch.

    As a general rule, people tend to overvalue their "vintage" watches in the first place. You <might> get lucky if you spend lots of time scouring garage sales and the like, but in general you're not going to get a deal on an Omega or anything else that is commonly regarded as a desirable watch. If you DO find what you think is a deal, double check it and then check it again, because the world is full of people looking to make a fast buck.
    My growing collection of "affordable" vintages: http://www.abslomrob.com

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