I learnt some jeweling over the weekend...

Thread: I learnt some jeweling over the weekend...

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22
  1. #1
    Member trim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    3,814

    I learnt some jeweling over the weekend...

    Seems that many watches I have bought over the last month have had cracked or chipped jewels. The result of this is a ever increasing pile of watches in pieces and less and less bench space as I had really been putting off learning how to do it. Even though I bought a Stietz press and borrowed a jewel selection some time ago

    Anyway, I finally gave in and bit the bullet - funny thing is, turned out to be easier than I expected

    This 1934 Octus (which I have posted before) had a movement full off gluey green oil, a bent second post and a (consequently) smashed jewel on the second wheel dial side. Original post here.

    Hole.



    New Jewel.



    Ready to assemble



    Dial Side.



    Assembled top bal pivot jewel and swan neck.



    Done.



    Was very nice to work on this one. Very nicely finished AS movement. The date of 1934 comes from the shield stamp on the movement, as dated by RR.



    That was fun, so I ended up replacing 3!!!! jewels in this trench watch.

    Cracked 3rd wheel top jewel. Bottom cracked as well. Can only be mishandling in the past.







    Colour is a bad match - but better a working watch.



    Bottom 3rd wheel.



    I also had to replace the top jewel for the anchor/lever as it broke when I cleaned it



    Checking it is right - the cock is very very thin.



    Not finished yet.

    Last edited by trim; November 1st, 2010 at 21:42. Reason: Added link to original post.

  2. #2
    Member Niccolo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    549

    Re: I learnt some jeweling over the weekend...

    Well done! I wish I could at least service my watches too!
    Cataratas do Iguaçu, Brazil => http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9KyiwSscdo

  3. #3
    Member Marrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    East Yorkshire, UK
    Posts
    7,743

    Re: I learnt some jeweling over the weekend...

    Impressive. You're learning these things at a very fast rate trim. I've managed a couple of straightforward services - but hats off to you sir!
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects."

    Will Rogers (1879 - 1935)


    Please don't PM me to ask for a valuation - I won't attempt one.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    120

    2 different types of jewels aren't they?

    Like Marrick, I've been able to manage a few servicings but I'm definitely envious of your newly acquired jeweling skills.
    I suspect that the Octus/A.Schild has friction fit jewels and the trench watch has bezel set jewels.
    How did you open and close the bezels holding the trench watch jewels?
    Are the replacements bezel set or did you use friction fit on the trench, as well?
    I've read Henry Fried's jeweling instructions, but I'm not daring enough (yet) to give it a try.
    Thanks.

  6. #5
    Member trim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    3,814

    Re: 2 different types of jewels aren't they?

    Thanks guys, I am just so pleased to have finally gone and done it. I have had the Octus in my pocket all day and it's such a buzz.

    Quote Originally Posted by Watchloon View Post
    How did you open and close the bezels holding the trench watch jewels?
    Are the replacements bezel set or did you use friction fit on the trench, as well?
    Actually both watches are very similar - they both use rubbed in jewels. My elderly watchmaker Horst suggested that I push them out in as close to one piece as possible (hence my use of the pump pusher) which would open the crimp a little. I then opened them by hand a little further. The important bit was to size the OD carefully push the normal friction fit jewels in and rub over. It leaves slightly less crimp as the friction fit jewels are square edged rather than beveled, but they are in there good, with side friction plus crimp - and they don't come out. I am sure some people will suggest this isn't the way to do things, but...

    ...I wanted to preserve the look of the bridges, and if you fit a friction jewel using the reamers and plain friction jewel, it looks bad. One could wax up a jewel on a lathe and grind a bevel, but it seems unnecessary.

    It made it a lot easier that Horst lent me the best pivot measuring tool in the universe

    I have yet to try jewels with chatons, but I have a couple in my queue - so perhaps next weekend

  7. #6
    Member trim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    3,814

    Re: 2 different types of jewels aren't they?

    A couple of things I have recently learnt the hard way (incl things I did wrong in my previous posts).

    1. If you have to replace both rubbed in jewels on one pivot (as above) - make sure that the hidden jewel (dial side) is a normal friction fit. This will let you adjust the end-shake while still preserving the correct look of the bridge. I did it wrong above, by rubbing both in and making the pivot too tight. One of the Duh! realizations.

    2. Don't use a pump pusher to insert a new jewel, I chipped a hole that way.
    Last edited by trim; November 8th, 2010 at 21:32.

  8. #7
    Member Marrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    East Yorkshire, UK
    Posts
    7,743

    Re: 2 different types of jewels aren't they?

    Today I learned that I have lost the canon pinion from the watch I was working on.
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects."

    Will Rogers (1879 - 1935)


    Please don't PM me to ask for a valuation - I won't attempt one.

  9. #8
    Member trim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    3,814

    Re: 2 different types of jewels aren't they?

    Quote Originally Posted by Marrick View Post
    Today I learned that I have lost the canon pinion from the watch I was working on.
    Damn. I hope it was something common(ish). *EDIT* Keep sweeping it might still turn up

    I have also just up-righted a pivot hole - I am feeling awesome Perhaps I should go to work, it is 10:45 am.
    Last edited by trim; November 8th, 2010 at 23:20.

  10. #9
    Member radger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    N.E England
    Posts
    3,383

    Re: 2 different types of jewels aren't they?

    Quote Originally Posted by trim View Post
    A couple of things I have recently learnt the hard way (incl things I did wrong in my previous posts).

    1. If you have to replace both rubbed in jewels on one pivot (as above) - make sure that the hidden jewel (dial side) is a normal friction fit. This will let you adjust the end-shake while still preserving the correct look of the bridge. I did it wrong above, by rubbing both in and making the pivot too tight. One of the Duh! realizations.

    2. Don't use a pump pusher to insert a new jewel, I chipped a hole that way.
    Trim, experience is the best teacher but you should know the correct techniques
    for the tools you use...rubbed in jewels can be let down to adjust end shake without
    being a friction fit, you simply deepen the seat or stone the jewel.

    Have you a manual for your Seitz tool, if not here is a link to one....

    http://ihc185.infopop.cc/helphand/pdf/seitz.pdf

    Marrick, that is unfortunate that you lost a part from your
    watch but I guarantee that if you stick with it the loss of
    parts will becomes very rare indeed....you will develop a
    methodology.

  11. #10
    Member Marrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    East Yorkshire, UK
    Posts
    7,743

    Re: 2 different types of jewels aren't they?

    Thank you. I'm a great believer in 'trial and error' as a learning method. And I'm making my errors on watches that are of little monetary value. I have no idea where the canon pinion went - it didn't ping out of the tweezers. It just wasn't there when I went to retrieve from the ice-cube tray I use. Perhaps I was robbed.
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects."

    Will Rogers (1879 - 1935)


    Please don't PM me to ask for a valuation - I won't attempt one.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •