Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

Thread: Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

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  1. #1
    Member greyno3's Avatar
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    Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

    This was my grandfathers watch and I am looking for info on what model & year it is. I Don't even know how to open to look inside. The backside is just dirty.

    Can anyone help me out?

    Thank You



  2. #2
    Member Erik_H's Avatar
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    Re: Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

    Hi and welcome. Here are some tips on how to open different case types, my guess is that yours is a swing out case, or a screw back and bezel:

    http://www.thewatchguy.com/pages/OPENCASE.html

    If after reading this you are still not sure, bring it to a watch maker who should be able to show you how to open without charge.
    Erik_H
    Member NAWCC Chapter 149

  3. #3
    Member greyno3's Avatar
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    Re: Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

    I managed to unscrew the case apart. I see The Dueber Watch Co., 21 Jewels and 3154012 serial number. The case is an Elgin Nickel type

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  5. #4
    Member greyno3's Avatar
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    Re: Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

    Quote Originally Posted by greyno3 View Post
    I managed to unscrew the case apart. I see The Dueber Watch Co., 21 Jewels and 3154012 serial number. The case is an Elgin Nickel type
    Is this a rare watch or worth getting restored?
    Attached Images Attached Images


  6. #5
    Member Shangas's Avatar
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    Re: Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

    At 75,000 watches, I don't think it's that rare. And whether it's "worth" it depends on your definition of the word 'worth'.
    "Pipes are occasionally of extraordinary interest...nothing has more individuality save, perhaps, watches and bootlaces."

    - Sherlock Holmes.

    'The Yellow Face'.

  7. #6
    Member greyno3's Avatar
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    Re: Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

    Well, is it expensive to restore? I like it and it's old!


    Last edited by greyno3; May 31st, 2010 at 10:00.

  8. #7
    Member radger's Avatar
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    Re: Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

    That's a very nice heirloom watch and with your grandfathers initials it
    is a precious watch indeed.
    It is also a high grade watch and is probably railroad grade, it seems to
    fit all the criteria although I'm not that knowledgable on U.S watches but
    there are plenty in here who are and someone will tell you more.

    It is definately worth having this watch serviced and a new hour hand
    fitted and provided there are no major problems it shouldn't be expensive.

  9. #8
    Member Shangas's Avatar
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    Re: Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

    How expensive it is to restore depends on various factors...

    1. Define "restore". Do you want the watch to just WORK? Or do you want it to look nice?

    1a. If you want it just to work, then is the watch broken? If it is, that means it'll be more expensive, because you'll need to find a replacement or remanufactured part. If the watch is just dirty, a standard servicing and regulation should cost a couple of hundred dollars.

    1b. Do you want the watch restored to "like new" condition? If the answer is yes, then you'll need to have the case cleaned and polished (if it can be), you'll need the broken hand replaced and you still need the servicing and cleaning of the movement.

    2. How much do you love the watch? If it's just something you wanna fix up and sell, then it's probably not worth it, because you won't make any money back in profit from the sale of the watch, after having it serviced and cleaned and restored to sell it. If you want the watch restored and cleaned as a family heirloom, then I think it's a good idea to start hunting for watchmakers.

    Either way, it will cost a significant amount of money, whether it's being fully restored, or just being cleaned so that it can run properly.

    It's certainly a good-quality watch which would have looked beautiful when it was new, so on that level alone, I think it's worth restoring, but you wouldn't be able to reclaim a profit from the restoration-costs if you sold this watch.

    --- --- --- ---

    Radger, a railroad watch had to be adjusted to TEMPERATURE (the ability of the watch to keep time in extremely cold and extremely hot weather) and ISOCHRONISM (the ability of the watch to keep time, regardless of the mainspring's level of tension). Usually, these adjustments would be engraved on the watch-movement.

    I can see: "ADJUSTED FIVE POSITIONS", "DOUBLE ROLLER" and "21 JEWELS", according to the database, it's lever-set...but without those other two criteria fulfilled, I don't think this is a fully-fledged railroad watch.

    But it should keep wonderful time once it's serviced.
    Last edited by Shangas; May 31st, 2010 at 10:20.
    "Pipes are occasionally of extraordinary interest...nothing has more individuality save, perhaps, watches and bootlaces."

    - Sherlock Holmes.

    'The Yellow Face'.

  10. #9
    Member radger's Avatar
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    Re: Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

    Quote Originally Posted by Shangas View Post
    Radger, a railroad watch had to be adjusted to TEMPERATURE (the ability of the watch to keep time in extremely cold and extremely hot weather) and ISOCHRONISM (the ability of the watch to keep time, regardless of the mainspring's level of tension). Usually, these adjustments would be engraved on the watch-movement.

    I can see: "ADJUSTED FIVE POSITIONS", "DOUBLE ROLLER" and "21 JEWELS", according to the database, it's lever-set...but without those other two criteria fulfilled, I don't think this is a fully-fledged railroad watch.

    But it should keep wonderful time once it's serviced.
    Hi Shangas,

    Thanks for that info Shangas.

    Does Temperature compensation and Isochronism have to be
    mentioned on the plates for it to be railroad grade?

    These are the first two adjustments of even cheap 'unadjusted' to position watches.
    It can be seen from the pic that this balance is a bi-metalic temperature
    compensated, cut and complete with temperature compensation screws.
    It is inconceivable, to me at least, that this adjusted to five positions
    watch wouldn't also be adjusted to temperature and isochronism.

  11. #10
    Member Shangas's Avatar
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    Re: Info on Hampden Pocketwatch

    I generally assumed that such...eh...specifications (such as temperature and ischronism) would have to be explicitly MENTIONED (ie: engraved) onto the movement, so that there would be no confusion about the watch's level of workmanship and accuracy.

    Of course, I may be wrong. If this watch *DOES* have temperature & ischronism adjustments, then this would indeed (once it's been restored) be a railroad watch.
    "Pipes are occasionally of extraordinary interest...nothing has more individuality save, perhaps, watches and bootlaces."

    - Sherlock Holmes.

    'The Yellow Face'.

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