Information on Movement Calibre measurement

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  1. #1
    Member thesteamer187's Avatar
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    Information on Movement Calibre measurement

    Please help me, I am trying to source parts for my Remova Hunter, but they list the parts sizes as Calibre where I am measuring in mm. can anyone tell me how I relate measuring across the movement and getting 41.8mm to caliber, the broken stem that I would like to purchase is 20.5mm long and 1.2mm thick across the tread, This is a fontainmellon or FHF movement and has F . 15 next to FHF but upside down to it, please ask for any other relevant info you need to help me also does the crystal glass fit into the grove in the bezel something i read said to add .01 to the width of the inside diameter to size the glass is this true? Keith.
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  2. #2
    Member AbslomRob's Avatar
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    Re: Information on Movement Calibre measurement

    Here's one of the best watch size references I've found:
    [ELGIN] Watch Sizes

    Which makes it an 18.5''' watch. Can't find anything that looks like it in Ranfft's or Bestfit though. The movement side shot is very blurry, but it looks like there used to be a micrometric regulator control screwed to the balance bridge? I just see two small holes on the top. The design almost looks like it was supposed to support a full balance bridge...interesting, that.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Information on Movement Calibre measurement

    A calibre isn't a dimension, it's like a model number.

    The first step in determining a calibre (model number) is usually looking for markings on the metal. For instance, on yours I can see the markings for FHF (Fontainemelon) so even though I can't read the other text there, I know it's a FHF movement.

    You provide the dimension in mm so like AbslomRob said, we can determine that it's a 18.5''' size (1'''=1ligne=2.225mm ... a ligne is a historical unit of mearurement common for Swiss watches. USA had a different set of standard sizes. Russia just used mm. I think Japan and others used lignes too.)

    So know we switch to a combination of reference material for 18.5''' FHF movements. If you have nothing else, start at Ranfft's pink pages: bidfun-db Archive: Watch Movements

    He lists several FHF 18.5''' movement but not one that looks the same as yours. You can get the idea that FHF made several 18.5''' sized calibres that had slightly different dimensions and features. It looks like yours has "F15" text on it which sounds like a similar calibre naming method as the ones that Ranfft does list.

    I switch to a book reference I use called "Bestfit" and they don't list much in the way of 18.5''' FHF movements.

    Next I switch to julesborel.com which is the web site for a US based watch parts supply store. They don't list a F15 either.

    This doesn't mean that a F15 didn't exist, just that it's not very common any more and finding parts for it will likely mean have to resort to finding another matching movement and stealing parts from it.

    For a stem, you might end up doing trial and error to find one that's close lengthwise and modifying it to fit with a file.

    Glass crystals usually measure to fit and get glued in place. Getting a crystal larger than the opening is usually for press fit styles that are often acrylic or, if glass or saphire, use a compression gasket (usually seen in divers from the 1960s onward and not common for vintage pocket watches).
    Last edited by bjohnson; January 19th, 2011 at 21:28.
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    Over the years I've collected all sorts of movements and "project" watches ... mainly inexpensive vintage pieces.

    These days I've widened my gaze to include modern pieces (including quartz with analog or analog + digital displays) but with those I'm generally looking for models in solid steel cases.

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  5. #4
    Member pithy's Avatar
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    Fhf 2

    ? (That's what the envelope is marked.)
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    Member AbslomRob's Avatar
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    Re: Fhf 2

    Definitely the same family, but yours (if its actually an FHF 2) is 10.5''' (23mm, almost half the size of the OP's). Slightly different click too; yours is probably much younger.
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  7. #6
    Member pithy's Avatar
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    under the dial,

    Quote Originally Posted by AbslomRob View Post
    Definitely the same family, but yours (if its actually an FHF 2) is 10.5''' (23mm, almost half the size of the OP's). Slightly different click too; yours is probably much younger.
    it's clearly stamped "FHF 2". It measures 42mm (and change) and it's an open face of course. There's a whole series of FHF pw movements that have scanty documentation.

  8. #7
    Member AbslomRob's Avatar
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    Re: under the dial,

    Interesting...I knew there were different widths but I hadn't thought they used the same caliber number for different lignes. What does the dial look like? Any idea what year yours is? I had assumed from the finish and the click that it was a later (1930's or 40's) watch.
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  9. #8
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    Re: under the dial,

    Hi ladies,

    on almost all calibre pages for early FHF movements I gave this short description about the
    identification of these movements:
    FHF 1 to FHF 16 designate movement generations containing calibres of different dimensions;
    individual designations start with FHF 22.

    So don't mind the bridge shapes; they even differ within one generation and the particular
    dimensions.

    If materials are needed, in most cases the diameter in Paris lignes and the height between
    base plate and highest bridge (wheels, regulator etc not included) are taken for reference.
    Moving parts are almost always intercnagable between the generations 1...16, but of course
    almost never between calibres with different sizes.

    Regards, Roland Ranfft
    Last edited by Roland Ranfft; January 20th, 2011 at 04:21.

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