Longine Running fast

Thread: Longine Running fast

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  1. #1
    Member Deacon's Avatar
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    Longine Running fast

    Hello all!

    I'm normally over on the G Shock forum, So I hope you don't mind if I ask a silly question.
    I happened to acquire a Longine dress watch today at the local Salvation Army store. My wife snagged a Baby G too!
    It was a bit of a mess appearance wise. But I figured it was worth the 30$ they were asking.
    I got it home and cleaned it up then took a peek at the movement.
    I know that it's a Calibre 370 and it runs well. A little to well. When I first wound it up it was gaining about 10 seconds every minute. I tried slowing it down by gently moving the adjustment to the Neg sign. After moving it as far as it would go It's still gaining about a second every minute.

    Did I waste 30 dollars or do I simply need to get it properly serviced?

    I don't really have a decent camera to take a proper pic. But I'll post some as soon as I can.

  2. #2
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: Longine Running fast

    It's impossible to tell, even with pics. A watchmaker will have to have a look at it. It could be something simple. But it will require some attention.
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  3. #3
    Member Deacon's Avatar
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    Re: Longine Running fast

    Quote Originally Posted by Eeeb View Post
    It's impossible to tell, even with pics. A watchmaker will have to have a look at it. It could be something simple. But it will require some attention.
    I see that your from the Great Lakes.
    I'm in Sterling Heights, any suggestions of a good Watch Maker?

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  5. #4
    Member JohnF's Avatar
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    Re: Longine Running fast

    Hi -

    The little lever you've moved is called the micrometer adjustment.

    In adjusting watches, a watchmaker is faced with two tasks:

    a) getting the basic elements of the watch to work harmoniously together with the greatest amount of precision;

    b) after establishing the best basic accuracy, adjusting the watch in various positions and temperatures to obtain the smallest average deviation from a known time source.

    The first part is the hard part: the fundamental accuracy of any watch is based on the design of the watch movement, from the power curve of the mainspring to the shape of the escapement and above all the geometry of how all moving parts interact with each other. Quite a bit of math actually goes on inside the watch, and you can think of it as a series of linear equations that give you step function results.

    Once the fundamental watch movement is okay, the fun stuff starts.

    In earlier days, movements would come from the factory and were placed in cases at the watchmaker/jeweler, and the watchmaker would do the final adjustment of the watch in two or more positions (and perhaps temperatures, if the customer was paying for it...). This is where the watchmaker made money, by adding value to the product. The movement makers also sold finished watches to the watchmakers directly and both profited by economies of scale, but the value added for the watchmaker started to shrink as it was slowly transferred from the watchmaker to the watch manufacturer. Nowadays it is almost completely with the watch manufacturer.

    The micro-adjustment serves only for the final tweaking of the time-keeping qualities of the watch. As with all mechanical devices, this will change over time, and it is vastly simpler to adjust this rather than do a complete diagnostic and strip-down of the watch to fix whatever is ailing it.

    But what does this micro-adjustment actually do? Generally it does one thing: it changes the geometry of the hairspring, the beating heart of the watch. This is, so to speak, the soul of the movement, and extremely small changes here have massive impact on the time-keeping qualities of the movement. But only to a certain degree: generally speaking, this can be used to adjust, at the most, an arc of around plus/minus 30 seconds per day.

    Hence whatever is wrong with your movement can't be compensated for by small changes in the geometry of the hairspring, but reflects a more serious problem. Given that Longines is a pretty good manufacturer and spare parts are relatively available, you should be able to have it repaired successfully without too much difficulty and/or cost. Whether it's worth it to you is a different question entirely...

    JohnF
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  6. #5
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: Longine Running fast

    Quote Originally Posted by Deacon View Post
    I see that your from the Great Lakes.
    I'm in Sterling Heights, any suggestions of a good Watch Maker?
    I used to live in Southfield but wasn't into watches then... At the top of the forum page are 'stickies' - posts that stay at the top. One of them gives references to several professional watchmaker organizations. Look in Michigan and you should find some fairly nearby.
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

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