Lose a few seconds - Bunn Special
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  1. #1
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    Lose a few seconds - Bunn Special

    Hi, everyone! I recently purchased a 1919 Bunn Special and it seems to be performing well, but I've been trying to to find its position to get it to lose a few seconds to get it back in time with actual time. For hours with each position, I have tried dail down, dail up, (those two seem to gain time), and pendant down (which seems to be stable, not gaining or losing seconds) and now I'm trying laying it on its side with the pendant on the right. Any suggestions to help lose some time?

    I don't suppose hacking a 100 year old movement is an option haha.

    Also, do pocket watches lose or gain time at a faster rate, when they are more wound or less wound?

  2. #2
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    Re: Lose a few seconds - Bunn Special

    Dude, relax. You are going to drive yourself around the bend.

    It's a 100 year old mechanical device that's running within its designed parameters. Remember, these were required to keep time within 30 seconds every week or two, so losing or gaining up to 4 seconds a day is running damn near perfectly.

    Don't try to get it exact. Just wind it fully every morning and re-set it when it gets more than 30 seconds ahead of or behind the time. As long at that's no more frequently than every 7 days, your watch is running within spec, which is pretty amazing - what else, at 100 years old, works so well?

    If a couple seconds off bothers you, maybe vintage watches are not for you.
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    Re: Lose a few seconds - Bunn Special

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneJockey View Post
    Dude, relax. You are going to drive yourself around the bend.

    It's a 100 year old mechanical device that's running within its designed parameters. Remember, these were required to keep time within 30 seconds every week or two, so losing or gaining up to 4 seconds a day is running damn near perfectly.

    Don't try to get it exact. Just wind it fully every morning and re-set it when it gets more than 30 seconds ahead of or behind the time. As long at that's no more frequently than every 7 days, your watch is running within spec, which is pretty amazing - what else, at 100 years old, works so well?

    If a couple seconds off bothers you, maybe vintage watches are not for you.
    Yeah, my Omega Seamaster is 50+years old and as long as it doesn't lose too much time over a week I'm not fussed. Every time I wear it I have to set the time and shake it to get it wound in any case. A few seconds here and there is not going to bother me if it runs that well after 100 years (not that I'll be around to enjoy it!)
    Omega Seamaster 300
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  5. #4
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    Re: Lose a few seconds - Bunn Special

    You watch is running very well for its design. Railroad watches needed to be no more then 30 sec or a min off per week.

    The watch is going to run most accurately with the pendant up since that is how they are worn in a vest. You could get a pocket watch hook to keep it pendant up over night.

    I am happy if a vintage watch after servicing is about a minute or 2 off per week fast. I don't want a watch that runs slow.

    On my pocket watch, I wind it up and set it at the beginning of the week and then reset it at the beginning of next week

    I don't work in a area that I need split second correctness in order to save humanity so a watch running a bit fast is fine.

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    Thanks everyone for the information. I just am trying to make sure everything is okay with it, because I just got it. I've got other mechanical wrist watches so I know there will be variation.

    Interesting question though. Yesterday, for most of the day with the pendant up it was dead steady not gaining or losing. Today, I wound it this morning and it was steady for awhile and then has begun to fall a second behind still in pendant up position. I wonder what is the difference between today and yesterday? Haha.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fridaysniper View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneJockey View Post
    Dude, relax. You are going to drive yourself around the bend.

    It's a 100 year old mechanical device that's running within its designed parameters. Remember, these were required to keep time within 30 seconds every week or two, so losing or gaining up to 4 seconds a day is running damn near perfectly.

    Don't try to get it exact. Just wind it fully every morning and re-set it when it gets more than 30 seconds ahead of or behind the time. As long at that's no more frequently than every 7 days, your watch is running within spec, which is pretty amazing - what else, at 100 years old, works so well?

    If a couple seconds off bothers you, maybe vintage watches are not for you.
    Yeah, my Omega Seamaster is 50+years old and as long as it doesn't lose too much time over a week I'm not fussed. Every time I wear it I have to set the time and shake it to get it wound in any case. A few seconds here and there is not going to bother me if it runs that well after 100 years (not that I'll be around to enjoy it!)
    How do you normally reset a pocket watch? Do you let it wind down then set the time or are you hacking it to reset the time?

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    Re: Lose a few seconds - Bunn Special

    I'm not sure what exactly you are trying to do here. Are you worried about the watch losing? If so, then I can tell you that the watch might be losing a whole minute a day and still be performing fantastically - what is far more important is the consistency with which it is gaining or losing. (OK, so if it gains an hour or two a day, something must be dramatically wrong, never mind how consistently it does so, but 4 seconds is nothing in that department!)

    Or are you trying to regulate it and cannot get it to run at the same rate in all positions? If so, then a maximum difference of only 4 secs/day between two positions is also quite acceptable. Especially for a watch of that age.

    FYI: accuracy (getting it to run at ±0 secs/day) can be easily achieved - barring positional/temperature/isochronic errors - by turning a screw on the balance cock (or something equivalent); consistency can only be improved by cleaning the watch altogether or even changing parts.

    [And that was my post No. 16666! The number of the beast - plus some more.....]

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  9. #8
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    Re: Lose a few seconds - Bunn Special

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthewlawson3 View Post
    How do you normally reset a pocket watch? Do you let it wind down then set the time or are you hacking it to reset the time?
    I set the time while it's running. I don't try to set the seconds. I just set the minute and hour hands to that the minute hand is precisely on a minute mark as the second hand passes through 60. I set the minute and hour hands so that it's within 30 seconds +/- of NIST (www.time.gov).

    Over time, the watch will gain or lose till it's more than 30 seconds out. Then I reset it the same way. Let's say I check a watch and it's 35 seconds fast after a week. I set it back a minute. Now it's 25 seconds slow. The question is, how often do I need to reset the time? As I say, if it's less than once every couple weeks, all is well.

    The thing to remember about mechanical watches, even railroad watches is that it doesn't run at a perfectly consistent rate at all times. A railroad watch may gain or lose a second or so early in the day that it then loses or gains later in the day, and still come out with 0 second variance over 24 hours. Same thing with positions. Sure, it would be ideal if the watch ran at EXACTLY the same rate in all positions and at every temperature, but they don't. There are slight differences, and they average out to a second or so a day.
    Don't take life so serious, son. It ain't nohow permanent - Pogo

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  10. #9
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    Re: Lose a few seconds - Bunn Special

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthewlawson3 View Post
    How do you normally reset a pocket watch? Do you let it wind down then set the time or are you hacking it to reset the time?
    It seems to me that you are obsessing over seconds and asking the PW to do something it was not designed to do. Typical PW-users are not concerned with split-second accuracy, and simply set the minute hand so that they are within one minute. Perhaps you can try this and see if it works for you.

    Based on your posts, the watch is running well within specs.
    -- Dan (formerly known as @badbackdan)
    ------- @oldwatchdan on Instagram -------

  11. #10
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    No I'm not trying to regulate. I recently purchased it and it was serviced and cleaned recently according to the Vintage dealer I bought it from. I'm just trying to understand its tendencies.

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