The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade

Thread: The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade

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  1. #1
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    The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade

    This watch was made by The Waterbury Watch Co. 1883-1885, it is a Series C. Longwind. The Long wind had a 9' long Mainspring, hence the name, and the entire mvt. revolves around inside of the case once every hour. The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade shows that it was an Advertising, give away or " scheme" watch as the Ingersoll Bros. refered to them . The Toledo Blade was a well known American Newspaper owned by David Ross Locke located in Toledo Ohio. The following info is from Wikipedia.

    David Ross Locke (also known by his pseudonym Petroleum V. Nasby) (September 20, 1833February 15, 1888) was an American journalist and early political commentator during the American Civil War.
    Locke's most famous work, the "Nasby Letters," was written in the character of, and over the signature of "Rev. Petroleum V(esuvius) Nasby" a Copperhead and Democrat. They have been described as "The Civil War written in sulphuric acid."
    Rob31 NAWCC Ch. 106,149
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    Last edited by Rob31; November 2nd, 2008 at 22:17.

  2. #2
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob31 View Post
    ... and the entire mvt. revolves around inside of the case once every hour....
    Amazing... we HAVE to have some movement pics!

    The Toledo Blade still exists.

    Ohio was a hotbed of copperheads (anti-Civil War Southern sympathizers) during the US Civil War. If anyone thinks things are vitriolic and divided nowadays, they should have see Ohio in the 1860s! Ohio was ruled under Martial Law by the Federal Government for a period. One prominent Democratic politician was arrested and deported to the South for his political opposition to the war. Civil War makes civil discourse difficult.

    To some extent the US still suffers from the effects 150 years later... the core of the red states are The South.

    ... But this watch survived! MORE PICS!
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  3. #3
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    Re: The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade

    Here you go eeb.
    This is a different mvt. as you can see, but one that I am restoring, and for all practical purposes it is identical to the Series C mvt . that is in the Nasby Watch. This one happens to be a Series E which was the next generation and the last of the Longwinds for Waterbury, 1885-1888. By the way I had not mentioned that this watch, and all Waterbury Longwinds has a Duplex Escapement. The first photo shows the front of the empty case, the second photo shows the inside of the case, the third photo shows the front of the mvt. w/center wheel and pinion, the fourth photo is not completely assembled, but shows the lower central arbor and mainspring winding arbor without the mainspring attached to the winding arbor, but with the mainspring in place on the notched ring.
    Hopefully this all makes sense. The last photo is the inner back cover which retains the mainspring . On the series E this cover is complete with the Warning as follows " Don't Remove This Cap Unless You Are A Practical Watch Repairer"
    As always please click on thumbnails for enlargement.
    eeb, I thank you for your additional commentary and isn't it the truth, that the USA is still reeling from political events in this country of nearly 150 years ago!!!

    Rob31 NAWCC ch.106,149
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    Last edited by Rob31; November 2nd, 2008 at 06:53.

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    Re: The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade

    Very interesting, thanks for posting. Being a duplex does it tick once a second? I have seen one "Chinese" duplex pocket watch from approx. 1840 and that watch advanced the second hand once a second. If one didn't know better they'd think it was a quartz.

  6. #5
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    Re: The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade

    Ron in PA,
    Ron these Waterburys, and most New Englands which was sold to Waterbury and I believe some Trentons , also all ultimately purchased by Ingersoll, produced these Duplex Escapements in the early 1900's, No they do not tick once a second and sound like a quartz . They have a long tooth on the escape wheel as well as a short impulse tooth as every other one on the escape wheel. The short impulse tooth is activated by the impulse pin on the balance wheel and is angled upward and the long tooth is straight and is always in contact with the body of the staff on the center of the balance wheel. This is called a Frictional Escapement, as opposed to a Detached Escapement where the Escape teeth wheel are arrested for impulse and then made free.There is a very clear and accurate picture of this escapement in " The Price Guide to Watches" By Gilbert, Engle & Shugart on pg. 62. I hope my explanation is accurate, but the picture says it all. They certainly do tick and toc.
    Rob31
    Last edited by Rob31; November 2nd, 2008 at 22:21.

  7. #6
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade

    How long is the power reserve? I would expect it not to be 35-40 hours like many watches...
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  8. #7
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    Re: The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade

    Very good ? eeb, I wound one yesterday, it takes roughly140 full turns of the stem and it is still running 18 hrs later. I'll let you know! Much publicity was given to this watch when it appeared on the market in 1881 as Series A . Waterbury made the watch from a Patent by Benedict & Burnham a major brass mfg co. in Connecticut at the time. The original Series A was cased in White, Black or Malachite colored celluloid cases, or in Nickel cases with a few rare Aluminum cases released the first year. The watch contained only 58 parts at first issue and was reduced to 56 by the second year of mfg. The series B. As time passed in the 1880's. The Dollar watch companies began to experiment w/ watches having more conventional winding systems. New Haven for example and Ansonia were a couple of the first and actually were pocket sized clocks from these 2 clock companies. The Waterbury longwind began to fall out of favor by the end of the 1880's and actually became the brunt of Vaudeville Jokes of the time because of the lenght of time to wind your watch. In the early 1890's The Ingersoll Brothers Robert and Charles contracted w/ Waterbury to produce 500,000 cheap watches, and the rest of the dollar watch story became history as Ingersoll purchased waterbury, and began producing a $1.00 watch by 1896. Here is a piece of ephemera advertising the Original Waterbury Longwind.
    Rob31
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  9. #8
    Mod. Russian, China Mech. Chascomm's Avatar
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    Re: The Nasby Watch Toledo Blade

    Quote Originally Posted by RON in PA View Post
    Very interesting, thanks for posting. Being a duplex does it tick once a second? I have seen one "Chinese" duplex pocket watch from approx. 1840 and that watch advanced the second hand once a second. If one didn't know better they'd think it was a quartz.
    The 'Chinese duplex' features an escape wheel with the (horizontal) escape teeth bunched in pairs separated by a long gap in which the (vertical) impulse tooth does its thing. This created the illusion of a dead-beat escapement. It is not a standard feature of other duplex escapements.

    For some reason Chinese buyers prefered a big sweep second hand that advances once per second. In more recent times, other devices have been invented to create the same effect (e.g. Rolex Tru-Beat), but these act upon a centre-seconds sub-train, rather than monkeying around with the escapement. These days of course, a one second beat is the very last thing that any collector wants

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