An observation
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Thread: An observation

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  1. #1
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    An observation

    A few weeks back, I posted this 1950s French-made Chrisfer as my WRUW of the day, having just had it serviced. It’s powered by an unprepossessing, but nowadays uncommon, 15j Lorsa 652 pin lever and I suddenly became aware that it was taking rather a long time to fully wind down.

    R.R.’s archive attributes a power reserve of 37hrs to this movement, so I fully wound mine again and left it dial up on my desk, synching it with the atomic clock and taking a note of the start time. On the first trial, it ran for 52hrs 30mins with no visual loss of accuracy until inside the final few minutes, but not really believing my own eyes, I repeated the exercise. This time it ran for 52hrs 45mins, again with the same degree of accuracy.

    Now, I usually expect something between the high twenties to the high thirties for my pin levers, but for this thing to seemingly out-perform all of my jewelled-lever movements by some margin is both remarkable and testament to what a 60-odd years old pin lever can still achieve. Just wanted to share this!

    Regards.
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  2. #2
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    Re: An observation

    On one hand, this is remarkable, even with a recent service, one the other hand, it shows what a service can do, even on such a simpler movement, besides keeping the watch in good condition. It's often advisable to give a watch in the collection a service, rather than spending the money on the next 5 inches on the pile. It's a totally different little machine and I rather have one of those, then ten alike not working well.

    One of the first things I got along with the collection was a timegrapher (a real one, not an app for the smartphone). It tells you much more than just comparing the time against a radio controlled watch. A watch, for me, means time and precision (with all tolerance when it comes to antique pocketwatches or some very special specimens), otherwise I would rather wear a nice bracelet and get the time from the smartphone.

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    Re: An observation

    Understood, but what, pray, is a "smartphone"?

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  5. #4
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    Re: An observation

    A totally different animal with a constant drive power, but still remarkable. I introduced this late 1970s TIMEX electric watch, movement M67 3 days ago (WRUW March 2019) and gave it a new battery on that day. As it has a hacking feature, I could set the seconds hand correctly to a radio controlled Junghans watch. As the crown in the back is a bit tricky, I couldn't get it 100% synchronous and noted -1 sec. from the radio controlled watch. And now look at the image, taken a few minutes ago. Of course, it has bearing jewels, unlike other Timex movements (it's based on Durowe cal. 861), but that precision (admittedly on a watch stand) is also part of the fun for me.
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    Last edited by Border-Reiver; March 31st, 2019 at 16:06.
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  6. #5
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    Re: An observation

    Quote Originally Posted by Border-Reiver View Post
    A totally different animal with a constant drive power, but still remarkable. I introduced this late 1970s TIMEX electric watch, movement M67 3 days ago (WRUW March 2019) and gave it a new battery on that day. As it has a hacking feature, I could set the seconds hand correctly to a radio controlled Junghans watch. As the crown in the back is a bit tricky, I couldn't get it 100% synchronous and noted -1 sec. from the radio controlled watch. And now look at the image, taken a few minutes ago. Of course, it has bearing jewels, unlike other Timex movements (it's based on Durowe cal. 861), but that precision (admittedly on a watch stand) is also part of the fun for me.
    Those Timex Electric watches are capable of impressive timekeeping

    I have a Junghans atomic watch (Mega 1000) they are pretty impressive. However you would think that they might have made the Mega 1000 solar powered. After all they were competing against Casio Solar atomic digital watches and Seiko atomic solar digital watches (like the Seiko SPBG001) instead of having to unscrew (and possible strip or damage) case back screws.

    Still the Mega 1000 is a nice watch
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  7. #6
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    Re: An observation

    Quote Originally Posted by journeyforce View Post
    Those Timex Electric watches are capable of impressive timekeeping

    I have a Junghans atomic watch (Mega 1000) they are pretty impressive. However you would think that they might have made the Mega 1000 solar powered. After all they were competing against Casio Solar atomic digital watches and Seiko atomic solar digital watches (like the Seiko SPBG001) instead of having to unscrew (and possible strip or damage) case back screws.

    Still the Mega 1000 is a nice watch
    Well, the one on the left is the Mega1, the first radio contolled wristwatch worldwide. They came in five models and I have three of them. The new Junghans company still produces the wristbands in a limited number of colors. This is very important, as in these early models, the antenna is integrated in the band, which gives a superb reception, but it wears out a lot faster. You cannot just replace the band with a normal type and they are (and always were) somewhat expensive (110 Euros / 125 US$ today). As will all these radio controlled wristwatches, they are 'normal' quartz watches, but frequently contolled and adjusted if necessary by an atomic clock. These external atomic clocks, sending the signal, have an accuracy of +/- 1 second in several million years.

    There is an atomic wristwatch available, but very expensive, accurate 'only' to +/- 1 second in 1,000 years and with a very short power reserve.

    Watches like the Seiko Astor GPS get the correcting signals from GPS satellites. These satellites have their own atomic clock inside (clocks/several of them), but the accuracy of these smaller units is 'just' +/- 1 second in 10,000 years.

    The Junghans Mega1 in good condition has become expensive lately. As I strive to collect only watches in good condition (including NOS or in pristine from collections if possible), I was so far not able to get the last two models still missing.

    Whilst it is just a matter of buying such a radio controlled watch of any make with such an accuracy guaranteed, the fun lies really in having a vintage mechanical watch performing well when it comes to keeping the time.

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