Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

Thread: Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

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  1. #1
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    Confused Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

    Hi again to all Im sorry to be a pain but I have another question
    Can any one give me any info or leads regarding this pocket watch movement
    I think its a Fusee movement as for maker and age Ive have no idea

    Any help welcome and thank you in advance
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  2. #2
    Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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    Re: Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

    It looks vaguely like it. However, the picture is a little out of focus to be sure. The mainspring barrel sides should be stepped and there should be a thin chain wrapping around them for it to be a fusee.

    Hartmut Richter

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    Re: Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

    The mainspring barrel sides are stepped but the thin chain seems to be missing this is what made me think fuess Hartmut Richter
    the stepped mainspring sorry about the poor pictures of the inturnals.

    Is there anyway of dating this is it English who was it made by or is it impossible to find this info out. I only have google as my sauce.
    Google is an ok sauce this is how i found out it was a possible fusee movement but its not as useful as this forum where the experts seem to gather :)

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    Re: Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

    Quote Originally Posted by lenny123 View Post
    The mainspring barrel sides are stepped but the thin chain seems to be missing this is what made me think fuess Hartmut Richter
    the stepped mainspring sorry about the poor pictures of the inturnals.

    Is there anyway of dating this is it English who was it made by or is it impossible to find this info out. I only have google as my sauce.
    Google is an ok sauce this is how i found out it was a possible fusee movement but its not as useful as this forum where the experts seem to gather :)

    Your watch movement is a nine jewel English lever with fusee.
    The movement was most likely made in Prescot, Lancashire, finished and retailed by Collings and Wallis C1870

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    Re: Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

    What Radger said. The conical thing that the chain wraps around is the fusee, a way of equalising the force of the mainspring from wound up tight to mostly unwound. Pretty cool idea, actually. The chain is like a tiny bicycle chain, and I understand they used to use small children to make them since they had good eyes and small hands.
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    Re: Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

    The fusee was a good idea for verge watches, because the verge escapement was a lot more sensitive to the amount of force being applied to it. It's usefulessness in a detached lever is significantly less so, especially compared to the additional complexity required to construct them. But by that point, the British watchmakers were somewhat mired in their own conservatism, to the point that they were adding fusee's to pendulum clocks. The lack of a fusee is one of the reasons they dismissed out of hand the implications of the new American style watches. Kinda sad, really.
    My growing collection of "affordable" vintages: http://www.abslomrob.com

  8. #7
    Member radger's Avatar
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    Re: Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

    Quote Originally Posted by AbslomRob View Post
    The fusee was a good idea for verge watches, because the verge escapement was a lot more sensitive to the amount of force being applied to it. It's usefulessness in a detached lever is significantly less so, especially compared to the additional complexity required to construct them. But by that point, the British watchmakers were somewhat mired in their own conservatism, to the point that they were adding fusee's to pendulum clocks. The lack of a fusee is one of the reasons they dismissed out of hand the implications of the new American style watches. Kinda sad, really.
    The fusee improves the isochronism of the timepiece, simple as that.

    English watchmakers never 'dismissed out of hand the implications of American style watches'.
    I've read contemporary articals which highlights the concern of the English watchmakers over what they
    called the 'American slop trade'. They dropped many old horological practices in order to compete with the cheap
    end market and the influx of low grade Walthams and Elgins. This was ultimately their demise, they just couldn't
    build a cheap, low grade watch like the U.S could.
    Last edited by radger; November 28th, 2012 at 21:47.

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    Re: Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

    Quote Originally Posted by radger View Post
    TThis was ultimately their demise, they just couldn't
    build a cheap, low grade watch like the U.S could.
    Wow. That's ironic.
    Don't take life so serious, son. It ain't nohow permanent - Pogo

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  10. #9
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    Re: Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

    If one remembers that more American watches were built by Ingersoll than all others combined, then in characterizing American watches of this era as slop watches, one can see vivacity of such a statement. But even the low grade Waltham and Elgins did exceed the horological capabilities of the bulk of the English industry. They weren't the slop watches.
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  11. #10
    Member radger's Avatar
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    Re: Is this old pocket watch movement a Fusee. Also any help dating this would be nice

    Quote Originally Posted by Eeeb View Post
    If one remembers that more American watches were built by Ingersoll than all others combined, then in characterizing American watches of this era as slop watches, one can see vivacity of such a statement. But even the low grade Waltham and Elgins did exceed the horological capabilities of the bulk of the English industry. They weren't the slop watches.
    Oh dear, seems like this 130 year old quote hit a partisan nerve.

    Of course we all know that no country produced a good watch until America showed the rest
    of the world how, that is the gospel according to American watch collectors and can be read and 'confirmed'
    on many websites.

    Unsubstantiated quotes such as.."But even the low grade Waltham and Elgins did exceed the horological capabilities of the bulk of the English industry"
    simply confirm this dogma and adds to the misinformation which surrounds watchmaking history I.M.O.

    The quote 'American Slop Trade' was not mine and is taken from the history of Usher & Cole, an English watchmaking firm.
    The P.D.F can be read here and is an eye opener as to the state of English watchmaking late 19thC.

    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb....Cole150dpi.pdf

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