Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to pressent.

Thread: Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to pressent.

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  1. #1
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to pressent.

    Google has a new labs product that will search its entire database of books (5 million) and find the relative number of mentions of phrases over time since 1800.

    I thought it interesting to compare mentions of watches from various countries... It is skewed because I only searched English language books.

    Interesting data...

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    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  2. #2
    Mod. Russian, China Mech. Chascomm's Avatar
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    Re: Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to press

    Quote Originally Posted by Eeeb View Post
    Google has a new labs product that will search its entire database of books (5 million) and find the relative number of mentions of phrases over time since 1800.

    I thought it interesting to compare mentions of watches from various countries... It is skewed because I only searched English language books.

    Interesting data...

    Name:  Clipboard04.jpg
Views: 462
Size:  65.1 KB
    If you consider the sheer tonnage of glossy Swissophile tomes released since the 'mechanical watch renaissance' then the figures are not so surprising.
    Last edited by Chascomm; December 18th, 2010 at 04:49.
    Chascomm
    Moderator, Russian Watches & Chinese Mechanical Watches Forums
    (no, I am not going to list all my watches here)

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    Re: Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to press

    Very interesting, it matches very well with the mental map I have formed.

    The graph clearly shows the English industry declining after about 1880- 1900.

    The Americans disappear after 1960 when (I assume) the big names like Waltham, Elgin, Bulova etc. waned.

    The Swiss graph is upwards since the 1920. What is interesting is that it is still dominant throughout the 'Quartz crisis'.

    Aditya

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  5. #4
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to press

    I too made those observations... it does seem to match 'history'. (The NYTimes has a front page article today on this research tool.)

    One thing that surprised me was the relative obscurity of Japanese watches... given the WUS environment with all the emphasis on the Japanese vendors, I have forgotten that most of the world believes Japanese watches are insignificant when compared to Swiss watches. WUS biased my perceptions.
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  6. #5
    Member Niccolo's Avatar
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    Re: Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to press

    I'm surprised too at the obscurity of Japanese watches. I thought they'd be more visible especially at the time of the quartz revolution, since they caused it...
    Cataratas do Iguaçu, Brazil => http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9KyiwSscdo

  7. #6
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to press

    Quote Originally Posted by Niccolo View Post
    I'm surprised too at the obscurity of Japanese watches. I thought they'd be more visible especially at the time of the quartz revolution, since they caused it...
    Well, that's a common perception but it does not fit history.

    The quartz revolution was promoted by the Swiss. Seiko claims they were the world's first because they sold 100 hand made prototypes about 3 months before the Swiss released the Beta 21 quartz movement. But the Swiss released working watches in production volumes. These Swiss watches are still 'humming' today. Most of the survivors today are Omegas but I occasionally see a Patek Beta 21 quartz swim by in the 'bay... 21 Swiss companies cooperated in making the movement and all had rights to manufacture (actually I believe SSH built the actual movements).

    But these were all very expensive watches... quartz was often priced at the high end of the maker's line. The people who made quartz cheap were the Americans of Silicon Valley with LED and later LCD displays that could be 'stamped out' like circuit boards. These watch movements could be made for the price of their batteries. But Silicon Valley could make more money making computers than watches so Fairchild, National Semiconductor, Hughes Semiconductor, et. al. sold the product lines to the Japanese... the Japanese were not the creators of the quartz revolution. I think that is reflected in this data.
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  8. #7
    Member radger's Avatar
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    Re: Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to press

    That is one amazing tool.

    I've spent a while playing with it, graphing terms such as pocket watch and
    chronometer but the realy amazing thing is the wealth of reference material and very
    interesting reading that it brings instantly to your fingertips, and all neatly packaged
    chronologically in the data results below the graph.

    Mapping back to 1700 brings in a wealth of early material such as gentlemens magazines,
    monthly reviews, literary journals etc which I didn't even know existed. Clicking the
    links takes you to the exact scan of the page/pages where the articles appear and gives
    the option to view the full publication.
    I've read early articles on Harrisons chronometer trials and early makers...adding makers
    names will bring great results no doubt.

    It's mind boggling how Google can search millions of scanned books for words and
    phrases and bring that information to you, chronoligically ordered in seconds.

  9. #8
    Member Marrick's Avatar
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    Re: Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to press

    Yes, it is amazing. This is a chart for Enicar.

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    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects."

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    Please don't PM me to ask for a valuation - I won't attempt one.

  10. #9
    Member Niccolo's Avatar
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    Re: Reletive mentions of Swiss/American/German/Japanese/Chinese watches from 1800 to press

    Thanks for the history lesson =)
    Quote Originally Posted by Eeeb View Post
    Well, that's a common perception but it does not fit history.

    The quartz revolution was promoted by the Swiss. Seiko claims they were the world's first because they sold 100 hand made prototypes about 3 months before the Swiss released the Beta 21 quartz movement. But the Swiss released working watches in production volumes. These Swiss watches are still 'humming' today. Most of the survivors today are Omegas but I occasionally see a Patek Beta 21 quartz swim by in the 'bay... 21 Swiss companies cooperated in making the movement and all had rights to manufacture (actually I believe SSH built the actual movements).

    But these were all very expensive watches... quartz was often priced at the high end of the maker's line. The people who made quartz cheap were the Americans of Silicon Valley with LED and later LCD displays that could be 'stamped out' like circuit boards. These watch movements could be made for the price of their batteries. But Silicon Valley could make more money making computers than watches so Fairchild, National Semiconductor, Hughes Semiconductor, et. al. sold the product lines to the Japanese... the Japanese were not the creators of the quartz revolution. I think that is reflected in this data.
    Cataratas do Iguaçu, Brazil => http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9KyiwSscdo

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