Teardown: Hamilton Myron
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  1. #1
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    Teardown: Hamilton Myron

    Last but not least (for today), a nice blog post about taking apart a Hamilton Myron from the 1940s. A beautiful movement!

    Teardown + Service: Hamilton Myron calibre 980 | Watch Guy

    As usual, lots of photos if you follow the link.

    Enjoy,

    Christian

  2. #2
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    Re: Teardown: Hamilton Myron

    Thanks for posting all these tear downs. I love the look of those old Hamilton movements. If only they had been a little bigger or my wrist was thinner...

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    Re: Teardown: Hamilton Myron

    ... and the watch is back together: Reassembly: Hamilton Myron calibre 980 | Watch Guy
    john87300 likes this.

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  5. #4
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    Re: Teardown: Hamilton Myron

    Yummy! I only wish more appreciated what you have. These vintage Hamiltons are gems...
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

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    Re: Teardown: Hamilton Myron

    Lovely article. Thank you. My grandfather's Hamilton is a similar era - 1936, and my watchmaker actually discouraged me from having him refurbish it, as he was unsure that he could get a new mainspring. I see that you succeeded. That's very encouraging!
    Too many watches, not enough wrists.

    "Watches tie people to the celestial clockwork... but people have been encouraged by their clocks to ignore the daily and seasonal cycles and to pretend that there is nothing to contend with but metronome-paced linear time. We appear to have caged the sun inside a machine." Michael Young, The Metronomic Society, p. 204

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    Re: Teardown: Hamilton Myron

    Very cool. Love the teardown threads. Thanks for posting.

  8. #7
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    Re: Teardown: Hamilton Myron

    Quote Originally Posted by skywatch View Post
    Lovely article. Thank you. My grandfather's Hamilton is a similar era - 1936, and my watchmaker actually discouraged me from having him refurbish it, as he was unsure that he could get a new mainspring. I see that you succeeded. That's very encouraging!
    If it's the same movement, I still have 2 spare ones! Happy to send you one.
    DaveWinkler and skywatch like this.

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    Re: Teardown: Hamilton Myron

    Christian, I was surprised that you oiled the cap directly and not by pushing oil through the hole when the cap is back in place. This method works too, but it is a lot harder to place the cap precisely without smearing the oil drop in the process...

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    Re: Teardown: Hamilton Myron

    Quote Originally Posted by vbomega View Post
    Christian, I was surprised that you oiled the cap directly and not by pushing oil through the hole when the cap is back in place. This method works too, but it is a lot harder to place the cap precisely without smearing the oil drop in the process...
    Hmmm... a bit of a religious discussion here. I used to do it your way, until my master watchmaker, from whom I take tuition, showed me how to do it the way I do it now. I'd say your chances of smearing the oil are just the same if you oil the jewel rather than the cap. In both cases, you have to place the cap in the middle or you smear the oil.

    There are even people oiling the jewel and the cap, and I can't really say what's best. The result counts - e.g. a nice round blob of oil visible after assembly and a good amplitude.

    I'm in no position to favour any method, but I personally like to do it the way I'm doing it now. Come back in a year and I might have changed my mind

    Best regards,

    Christian

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    Re: Teardown: Hamilton Myron

    Quote Originally Posted by wilderbeest View Post
    Hmmm... a bit of a religious discussion here. I used to do it your way, until my master watchmaker, from whom I take tuition, showed me how to do it the way I do it now. I'd say your chances of smearing the oil are just the same if you oil the jewel rather than the cap. In both cases, you have to place the cap in the middle or you smear the oil.

    There are even people oiling the jewel and the cap, and I can't really say what's best. The result counts - e.g. a nice round blob of oil visible after assembly and a good amplitude.

    I'm in no position to favour any method, but I personally like to do it the way I'm doing it now. Come back in a year and I might have changed my mind

    Best regards,

    Christian
    It's not really my way, but a common way (pretty much any book on watchmaking recommends it). There is a zero chance of smearing the oil, because it is inserted through the jewel hole while the cap is already in place, screwed in. There are 2 ways of getting the oil through the hole: 1) by dropping oil in the jewel cup and then pushing through with oil inserter, or 2) by using a special oiler that can reach through the hole.

    I actually used to do it like you do until I tried the other method. Nothing wrong with yours, just more risk.

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