Vintage alarm watches

Thread: Vintage alarm watches

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  1. #1
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    Wink Vintage alarm watches

    Hi all

    Hope some can help me with some information.

    When it comes to vintage movement´s, a chrono is harder, more expensive to repair. Please say so if I am saying not the right things.

    But, how is a vintage movement that has the alarm added? More expensive and harder to work on? Not a job for all watchmakers to do?

    And, will the watch stil show the time, if the alarm part on the movement is not working? Sorry for the lack of the right words, stil trying to learn the right words when it comes to movement´s and the parts.

    Thansk for looking

    Cheers
    Vegard_dino

  2. #2
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: Vintage alarm watches

    Well, my cricket has been at the watch maker's for about 3 times longer than he normally keeps a watch... He says they are a pain to work on. But he had no trouble getting the needed parts!

    But I think it will be worth the wait ... as you get older, the alarms necessary to wake you get louder
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  3. #3
    JMS
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    Re: Vintage alarm watches

    If you search through my past thread you will see a lot of Crickets both Vulcain and Revue Thommen. I have maybe 11 in my current collection from the first Vulcain up to the 50th anniversary pieces and have never had an issue with them. Parts are available, some I have had serviced some not. Just watch for corrosion under the dial. With these you will never duplicate that sound in another alamr. Best to ask about before purchasing see a lot of redials and bad movements
    The simply pleasure of holding life’s vintage treasures is truly a joy. Some stay, some go to make room for others, you play with them for a while then look for a new toy, it is an addiction at least, a fascination of what is no more at best!

    BEST REGARDS,


    JMS

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  5. #4
    Mod. Russian, China Mech. Chascomm's Avatar
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    Re: Vintage alarm watches

    Quote Originally Posted by vegard_dino View Post
    Hi all

    Hope some can help me with some information.

    When it comes to vintage movement´s, a chrono is harder, more expensive to repair. Please say so if I am saying not the right things.

    But, how is a vintage movement that has the alarm added? More expensive and harder to work on? Not a job for all watchmakers to do?
    Any competent watchmaker should be able to service most ordinary alarm watches and repair them if parts can be found. Alarm is less complicated than chronograph

    And, will the watch stil show the time, if the alarm part on the movement is not working?
    Yes, unless the alarm-setting wheel has rusted onto the hour wheel. Usually when an alarm watch is sold on ebay with a broken alarm, the rest of the watch is still working.

    Parts for some alarm movements can be difficult to find now, however most hand-winding vintage alarm wristwatches use either the Schild AS 1475, or a version of that (e.g. with date), or a Poljot 2612.1 (which looks exactly like an AS1475 but the parts won't fit). These movements were so common that parts are not a problem. The Ronda 1223 was also a very popular movement but fewer have survived.

    The common automatic alarm movements are the AS5008, used by many brands, and the Seiko Bellmatic. AS5008 parts can probably be found as they are back in production, but the cost may be high. Seiko Bellmatics have not been made since the mid-1970s, are complicated and difficult to work on, and the parts can only be got from breaking up another Seiko.

    Here is an excellent site describing all(?) known mechanical wristwatch alarm movements:
    http://www.armbandwecker.at/rand.htm

    If there is a particular alarm watch that you are interested in, if you can find it on that site you will be able to ask the experts on this forum about it.

  6. #5
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    Re: Vintage alarm watches

    Hi and thanks aal for helping me

    Good information on what movement was used
    Thanks for the link, did mail to the site and got some very good help.

    The owner say the same as you, Chascomm, when it comes to movement´s: movement´s from AS and Lemania are more easy to find parts, cheap and long lasting.

    Thanks all

    Cheers
    Vegard_dino

  7. #6
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    Re: Vintage alarm watches

    ...brand new member; forgive me for reviving a rather old thread. At the moment I'm here specifically because I recently acquired a vintage (apparently 1970s) Neuvex automatic alarm watch with a perpetual calendar ring. Probably not particularly valuable or anything, but unusual enough (at least around here) to pique my interest. Plus I wanted a backup watch that I could wear to give my Citizen JR3000-51F 'Skyhawk' a rest. I found it at a yard sale, just the watch, no band; I gave the crowns a turn and it started running, but the day and date functions were iffy. I carefully opened it up and removed the stems (found the little buttons that release them so you can pull them out) and the movement with an eye on at the very least carefully cleaning the movement. I then discovered I had an AS5008 movement with Clinton Watch Co. stamped into the weight (apparently several different companies made these). After a Google search, I come to the conclusion that this movement seems to be somewhat highly regarded...and the same Google search led me here...
    ...The common automatic alarm movements are the AS5008, used by many brands, and the Seiko Bellmatic. AS5008 parts can probably be found as they are back in production, but the cost may be high. Seiko Bellmatics have not been made since the mid-1970s, are complicated and difficult to work on, and the parts can only be got from breaking up another Seiko...
    ...so, now I come to the point...unfortunately, I seem to have since broken the mainspring. I seem to have little trouble finding replacement mainsprings for vintage Swiss watch movements; however, does anyone know the specifics (barrel size, tension, length; I'm OK with metric sizes) for the correct mainspring for this movement?...and is it a mainspring that would be common to other movements?...and what would be a good source for one?...it seems easy enough to replace once I have the correct specs for it...

  8. #7
    Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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    Re: Vintage alarm watches

    Welcome. I am not sure what the exact mainspring specifications are but I do know that the movement is made nowadays by La Joux Perret (formerly: Jaquet) as their Cal. 5100. So there should be replacement parts around.

    Hartmut Richter

  9. #8
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    Re: Vintage alarm watches

    Quote Originally Posted by Hartmut Richter View Post
    Welcome. I am not sure what the exact mainspring specifications are but I do know that the movement is made nowadays by La Joux Perret (formerly: Jaquet) as their Cal. 5100. So there should be replacement parts around.

    Hartmut Richter
    ...according to the Google search I did on La Joux Perret, apparently that should be Cal. 5900. That movement is identified as being based on the AS5008, with a GMT hour disc replacing the day disc. And the information I found on this (in German, but I can read German sufficiently to make sense of it) mentions watches using the Cal 5900 with prices ranging from 1.000 all the way up to 200.000 Euro...!!...with that kind of numbers, I guess my old 5008 is definitely worth fixing...and talk about longevity--that a 60s or 70s movement is still being made today (albeit with a few changes)...

  10. #9
    Zenith Forum Co-moderator
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    Re: Vintage alarm watches

    Hmmm - the last time I read about it in the German watch magazines, I am sure they stated Cal 5100. But the Cal. 5900 may well be the second time zone (instead of day-date) derivative they make for Girard-Perregaux, Baume & Mercier and others. No matter - an original movement in decent state is certainly worth saving. It was made between 1973-1977 in only 175000 pieces. The Lemania Cal. 980 (Omega "Memomatic") is even rarer - only 35000 made.

    Hartmut Richter

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