Vintage Doxa needs repair

Thread: Vintage Doxa needs repair

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  1. #1
    Member mrsnak's Avatar
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    Vintage Doxa needs repair

    Been looking for a donor for this for some time.
    It's an early Doxa, but besides having a couple cracked jewels, a watchmaker dropped it and I think the subdial stem broke.
    Any referrals to places that may be able to work on it would be greatly appreciated.
    For scale, the case is 33mm and the movement is 28mm.





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  2. #2
    Member Eeeb's Avatar
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    Re: Vintage Doxa needs repair

    I would think you would have to be a real Doxa collector to spend what it will take to revive this watch. This fellow seems more like the donor watch... but, what do I know? It's your watch not mine.

    I have a watchmaker who can work on anything. But I can assure you if he has to make parts, you are getting into prices only Patek owners will pay (and they do!).
    "Forever is composed of nows." - Emily Dickinson

    "The watch has to be surrounded by a history.
    You need more than just a great design. You need to create an atmosphere around the product.
    Who is the company behind it? Why are they using this material?
    People need to be able to identify the watch with themselves. It's based on emotion." - Ralph Furter

    ...that's just my opinion and I've been wrong before and will be again and might be now!

  3. #3
    Member mrsnak's Avatar
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    Re: Vintage Doxa needs repair

    Quote Originally Posted by Eeeb View Post
    I would think you would have to be a real Doxa collector to spend what it will take to revive this watch. This fellow seems more like the donor watch... but, what do I know? It's your watch not mine.

    I have a watchmaker who can work on anything. But I can assure you if he has to make parts, you are getting into prices only Patek owners will pay (and they do!).
    Thanks Eeeb,

    Since many of these online seem to come of of Israel and Eastern Europe, I was hoping to maybe attract someone up here from those areas who might know of local watchmakers that might be able to help me.

    I do know that within the US these are not common watches, so I do not expect to find any resources here.

    That being said, I've never come across a Doxa this small with this design. I have come across later movements (one on eBay right now) that are from ladies' watches, and slightly smaller. The trick with this one is finding one with a subdial that will line up. Was thinking for $25 or so, it might be worth trying out.
    Last edited by mrsnak; October 30th, 2010 at 19:08.
    "My grail showed up today"

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  5. #4
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    Re: Vintage Doxa needs repair

    Quote Originally Posted by mrsnak View Post
    ...besides having a couple cracked jewels, a watchmaker dropped it and I think the subdial stem broke...
    Is that all

    The plating on the movement looks rough - but it is a stylish watch. If you want to save it, I can't see that you need a donor. Any competent watch maker ought to be able to put a new pivot/stem in the second wheel.

    In fact, the one who dropped it really should have done so out of shame

  6. #5
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    Re: Vintage Doxa needs repair

    Hi mrsnak,

    I feel always uncomfortable when characterizing such items. It was really friendly when Eeeb
    wrote that "This fellow seems more like the donor watch". I would not even take it as donor:

    Which parts should I use?
    The plates with peeled off nickel plating?
    The cock with missing balance cap jewel?
    The seconds wheel without hand post?
    The broken balance staff?
    The cracked dial with missing lume?

    And these are only the visible damages.

    All what ever breaks in a watch is broken here, so only parts are left which are o.k. in almost
    every watch.

    Restoring this watch to an acceptable optical and usable technical state will cost you some
    10 to 50 times the value it has after restoration.

    Regards, Roland Ranfft

  7. #6
    Member mrsnak's Avatar
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    Re: Vintage Doxa needs repair

    Sadly, I realize all this, but I can be foolish watch enthusiast.
    The movement is basically trash at this juncture.

    I also have restored cars, so you can understand my sickness.

    I did have this watch at a very competent L.A. watch repair after it was dropped, but they were unable to help me because they could not find parts. The watchmaker friend who had originally dropped it compensated me for its destruction, so it's just a project at this point. I think I spent $35 on this watch in the first place.

    I have a bid on a donor movement that may work. Let's see what happens.

    BTW- Roland,

    Any idea what this movement is? I spent some time looking for it on your site, but could not match it.



    Quote Originally Posted by Roland Ranfft View Post
    Hi mrsnak,

    I feel always uncomfortable when characterizing such items. It was really friendly when Eeeb
    wrote that "This fellow seems more like the donor watch". I would not even take it as donor:

    Which parts should I use?
    The plates with peeled off nickel plating?
    The cock with missing balance cap jewel?
    The seconds wheel without hand post?
    The broken balance staff?
    The cracked dial with missing lume?

    And these are only the visible damages.

    All what ever breaks in a watch is broken here, so only parts are left which are o.k. in almost
    every watch.

    Restoring this watch to an acceptable optical and usable technical state will cost you some
    10 to 50 times the value it has after restoration.

    Regards, Roland Ranfft
    "My grail showed up today"

  8. #7
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    Re: Vintage Doxa needs repair

    Quote Originally Posted by mrsnak View Post
    Sadly, I realize all this, but I can be foolish watch enthusiast.
    I hear ya! Likewise, I have restored cars also.

    Sometimes it is more than about the $. Yes Roland's advice is sound, but there is a huge enjoyment and challenge to be had about bringing these historic devices back to life. I don't see it as hopeless as Roland, but I am optimistic about these things, and he is much more experienced...

    I didn't realize the balance staff was also broken - that makes it a much more difficult case. Really the cap jewel is no bother, neither are the hairlines - they can be cleaned and it will look fine when wearing. The best way to repair this watch is put it aside, and practice your watchmaking like I am Then one day you will be able to fix it. Repairing such pieces makes more sense when it is for the lessons you will learn - at least that is my rationalization. I like to

    I doubt the donor will help you as the subdial will be in the wrong place for the dial - I should have though of that earlier.

    If you give up, you know who to send it to :-X

  9. #8
    Member mrsnak's Avatar
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    Re: Vintage Doxa needs repair

    Quote Originally Posted by trim View Post
    I hear ya! Likewise, I have restored cars also.

    Sometimes it is more than about the $. Yes Roland's advice is sound, but there is a huge enjoyment and challenge to be had about bringing these historic devices back to life. I don't see it as hopeless as Roland, but I am optimistic about these things, and he is much more experienced...

    I didn't realize the balance staff was also broken - that makes it a much more difficult case. Really the cap jewel is no bother, neither are the hairlines - they can be cleaned and it will look fine when wearing. The best way to repair this watch is put it aside, and practice your watchmaking like I am Then one day you will be able to fix it. Repairing such pieces makes more sense when it is for the lessons you will learn - at least that is my rationalization. I like to

    I doubt the donor will help you as the subdial will be in the wrong place for the dial - I should have though of that earlier.

    If you give up, you know who to send it to :-X

    I knew that the subdial might be in the wrong place. I superimposed the donor watch dial over mine, and it's pretty close with a little modification. Worth a shot.
    "My grail showed up today"

  10. #9
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    Re: Vintage Doxa needs repair

    Quote Originally Posted by mrsnak View Post
    BTW- Roland,

    Any idea what this movement is? I spent some time looking for it on your site, but could not match it.
    Looks somewhat like an FHF movement - Doxa were known to use them. Here is an example (exact calibre depends on age and size):

    bidfun-db FHF_014_18.5H4.2: FHF 14 18.5'''H4.2

    Hartmut Richter

  11. #10
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    Re: Vintage Doxa needs repair

    Hi mrsnak,

    don't understand me wrong, I don't regard it as hopeless. I've also restored such hopeless
    cases (also cars and watches) now and then. The worst was a ladies cylinder pocket watch,
    I guess the very bottom on the scale of collectors interest. I bought it for (equivalent) few
    bucks, and after some days of restoration work it looked and ran near new, but just
    represented few more bucks.

    If you just regard it as hobby, and don't calculate the time you spend, it is always worth
    while to give trash a second life. But if you employ a professional for one or the other task,
    better buy a runing watch in mint condition.

    I've no idea about the identity of the calibre. Doxa used ebauches from several sources,
    and modified them optically, so only a dial view of the movement gives a chance for
    identification.

    Regards, Roland Ranfft

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