Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy
Like Tree3Likes

Thread: Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    Member odd_and_vintage_fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    2,395

    Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

    In the summer of 2016, I picked up this beauty in rough shape for well below market value. It took until fall of 2017 to get things together and get it serviced. I've had four amazing months of it running pretty well and wearing it once or twice a week, but now it's not working so hot before and after a battery change. I want to be clear that I in no way blame where I got it serviced, and they've been amazing in communicating with me about the new issues. It seems like the watch is just wearing out from use.

    Name:  DSC02784.JPG
Views: 62
Size:  570.1 KB

    Personally, I'm bouncing between being heartbroken that I've used up the remaining life of the watch and thinking it's just a thing that was never meant to last forever. I was reading Rondeau's book on the Hamilton Electrics the other day and there was a line in it to the effect of there are no more parts (contact pins) being made, so every Hamilton Electric has a finite remaining life.

    Part of me wants to buy a cheap Vostok or Seiko diver and a spare movement for less than the cost of a service on an electric and wear the heck out of it while making a nice display case for a Landeron 4750, Standard Time Corp 130E, and Ruhla Cal. 26. These are fun to wear and to listen to sparking away on my wrist, but it doesn't feel worth wrecking something to which there are no replacement parts.

    I'm open to opinions on this. Tell me I'm overthinking this and should wear it or tell me that the preservationist side should win. I'm well and truly stuck on the fence and it's causing me stress in a hobby that should be enjoyable.

    Thanks for reading and for any commentary/advice you care to provide.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    902

    Re: Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

    I don't run my Hamilton & Vantage Electrics when not being worn and remove the batteries when it will be some time between wearing. I see no reason to subject them to more wear than necessary and, of all the type of watches I collect, I consider them as likely having the most limited practical lives. I'll also treat electronic balance wheels and tuning forks much the same, where practical, although they seem generally more robust.
    GeneJockey and Border-Reiver like this.

  3. #3
    Member Ron521's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,649

    Re: Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

    This is pretty much why people who own extinct vintage cars don't drive them to work every day....parts are scarce to non-existent, so the cars are only driven on special occasions.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    WatchUSeek.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Another time
    Posts
    1,922

    Re: Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

    Quote Originally Posted by Gumby992 View Post
    I don't run my Hamilton & Vantage Electrics when not being worn and remove the batteries when it will be some time between wearing. I see no reason to subject them to more wear than necessary and, of all the type of watches I collect, I consider them as likely having the most limited practical lives. I'll also treat electronic balance wheels and tuning forks much the same, where practical, although they seem generally more robust.
    +1

  6. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Another time
    Posts
    1,922

    Re: Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

    Quote Originally Posted by odd_and_vintage_fan View Post
    In the summer of 2016, I picked up this beauty in rough shape for well below market value. It took until fall of 2017 to get things together and get it serviced. I've had four amazing months of it running pretty well and wearing it once or twice a week, but now it's not working so hot before and after a battery change. I want to be clear that I in no way blame where I got it serviced, and they've been amazing in communicating with me about the new issues. It seems like the watch is just wearing out from use.

    Name:  DSC02784.JPG
Views: 62
Size:  570.1 KB

    Personally, I'm bouncing between being heartbroken that I've used up the remaining life of the watch and thinking it's just a thing that was never meant to last forever. I was reading Rondeau's book on the Hamilton Electrics the other day and there was a line in it to the effect of there are no more parts (contact pins) being made, so every Hamilton Electric has a finite remaining life.

    Part of me wants to buy a cheap Vostok or Seiko diver and a spare movement for less than the cost of a service on an electric and wear the heck out of it while making a nice display case for a Landeron 4750, Standard Time Corp 130E, and Ruhla Cal. 26. These are fun to wear and to listen to sparking away on my wrist, but it doesn't feel worth wrecking something to which there are no replacement parts.

    I'm open to opinions on this. Tell me I'm overthinking this and should wear it or tell me that the preservationist side should win. I'm well and truly stuck on the fence and it's causing me stress in a hobby that should be enjoyable.

    Thanks for reading and for any commentary/advice you care to provide.
    As a matter of interest, what are the "not working so hot" symptoms?

    Regards.

  7. #6
    Member odd_and_vintage_fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    2,395

    Re: Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

    Quote Originally Posted by balaton View Post
    As a matter of interest, what are the "not working so hot" symptoms?

    Regards.
    It ticks regularly for anywhere between 10 and 30 seconds, then ticks at double speed for a half a second while not advancing the seconds hand. At the same time, the timekeeping went from +30 sec/day to even to -30 sec/day over the course of two weeks. The effect is similar to when setting the hands, if I put backwards pressure on the crown, it would do the "poor man's hack" and stay in place with the faster beat rate. I tried my best not to do this, figuring it wasn't good for the movement.

    Also, thanks Gumby and Ron for the advice. Looks like I'll have to figure out a special occasion every few months to keep it from gumming up, but only run it for a few hours at a time.

  8. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    902

    Re: Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

    There's no need to be concerned about the watches "gumming up". In a properly serviced movement the lubrication will remain viable for it's effective life. It'll eventually require service/relubrication no matter what, but not running these partuicular watches unneccesarily will reduce wear.

  9. #8
    Member bluestifford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    357

    Re: Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

    I’ve heard amazing things about this guy.
    http://electric-watches.co.uk

  10. #9
    Member Border-Reiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    3,069

    Re: Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

    Quote Originally Posted by Gumby992 View Post
    I don't run my Hamilton & Vantage Electrics when not being worn and remove the batteries when it will be some time between wearing. I see no reason to subject them to more wear than necessary and, of all the type of watches I collect, I consider them as likely having the most limited practical lives. I'll also treat electronic balance wheels and tuning forks much the same, where practical, although they seem generally more robust.
    Amen!

    I strive to have at least one watch from every stage of development - mechanical - hand wind + automatic, electric, electronic, tuning fork, quartz controlled tuning fork, quartz controlled electric, quartz and radio controlled.

    They are all in optimal shape, but I would never wear an electric watch f.i. regularly. They stay in the collection as part the history, battery taken out. Why should I run down the last few months of their live?

    If you must wear an electric (or electronic), get a few from Timex in working condition and throw them away one by one when they are at their end.

  11. #10
    Member odd_and_vintage_fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    2,395

    Re: Vintage Electrics and Wearing Philosophy

    Thanks for this, everyone. It helps to have some more realistic expectations. Looks like I'm due for another watch box to keep the museum pieces separate from the wear pieces.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Similar Threads

    1. Replies: 11
      Last Post: February 10th, 2018, 15:31
    2. Replies: 64
      Last Post: June 9th, 2014, 10:39
    3. FS: 1952 Rolex Oyster Precision - Wind and wear vintage!
      By ibrando in forum Watches - Private sellers and Sponsors
      Replies: 7
      Last Post: February 7th, 2012, 19:07
    4. Vintage Electric-1968
      By James A Robertson in forum Affordable watches
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: March 12th, 2006, 07:20
    5. Questions about case and dial damage and wear
      By CottyGee in forum Vintage & Pocket watches
      Replies: 14
      Last Post: March 7th, 2006, 09:42

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •