What to do now?
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  1. #1
    Member busmatt's Avatar
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    What to do now?

    Lynn, Bishop's Lynn, Lynn Regis and King's Lynn, my home town has had many names over the past 1800 years or so and it's got it's fair share of history to go with it, part of it's history, like most towns at one time, was local watchmakers, one of those was a certain William Read Pridgeon who practiced in the mid to late 19th century at 103 High street


    Now a clothing shop

    Mr Pridgeon was also a photographer and in 1865 photographed the Royal family at Sandringham, what's with all these ramblings I hear you cry, well I came across this recently






    A lovely little Fusee movement by mr Pridgeon No 46576

    I think it was originally a ladies watch as it's only 35mm across, now I've just fallen in love with the dial and I'm thinking about what to do with it.

    It's not running at the moment so I need to drop it off at my watchmaker's but what should I do with it when it's running?

    I'm thinking about asking him to make a nice wrist watch out of it, is that a really bad thing to do? It's homeless at the moment and I think I'd rather see it as a nice dress watch, I feel it could be done sympathetically, I know Fusee movements were never meant for the wrist and there's the key wind thing to overcome but I'm thinking of a sort out hinged back trench style case like the early wrist watches

    Anyway I just thought I'd share this with you

    Matt


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  2. #2
    Member Border-Reiver's Avatar
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    Re: What to do now?

    Your movement reminds me a bit of one of mine shown below. I have a pile (a large pile) of movements mostly taken out of watches where the case has been sold for the gold value, which also means that they must be of a somewhat higher grade. At first I’ve thought they would be nice to study the inside of a watch without taking one apart. I collected highly interesting pieces with a lot of interesting features. But then, I soon felt that this is an unacceptable state of things, meaning that they should all come to their proper use again, but how do you do this? It did not come to my mind yet to have a wrist watch made with them inside. The smallest I have, has a diameter of 40mm and they are all much too heavy, leaving aside the key-wind issue on some of them.

    And what concerns the former shop of Mr Pridgeon in King’s Lynn, where they now sell clothes: You know that I am doing a lot of research myself whenever I have identified a watch and his maker (or when I find a paper inlay from a watchmaker who has sold or repaired the watch), going back to the 18th century. I found Internet cafes, betting offices, Kebab houses, hardware stores and I am often just happy to see that the old houses are still there. I recently pinned down a location in Huntly, Scotland (now a hardware store) and strolled around in the area with Google Street View.
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  3. #3
    Member Border-Reiver's Avatar
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    Re: What to do now?

    I just couldn't resist: This is the house Mr. Pridgeon bought in April 1831, I guess it is still there:

    GOLDEN FLEECE - WELLS

    What concerns his shop, I read in my smart book that this was at Saturday Market, but scanning the area with Google Street View, I just found that Shellfish Bar where I wished I would be standing in front now...

    You can say anything you like about English food, but the fish along the East Coast of the UK (besides the East coast of the USA, upwards from Washington DC.) is simply the BEST!
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  5. #4
    Member busmatt's Avatar
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    Re: What to do now?

    Mr Pridgeon's first shop was on the Saturday market place, he took it over from his employer he then moved to high street, it's just nice to have a locally made watch.

    On a side note, I regularly drive my bus passed the Golden Fleece in Wells next-the-sea, one day I'd love to wear the working watch and visit the Fleece


    Matt



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  6. #5
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    Matt,
    please make a desk clock out of it. That is what I have been meaning (!) to with my orphan fusee movements. One shouldn't expect one's grandmother to win the 100 meters at the Olympics, should one?
    Kind regards
    Aditya
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  7. #6
    Member busmatt's Avatar
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    Re: What to do now?

    That's a great idea, never thought of that

    Matt


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    " I can't wear this uniform, without some compromises "
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    "I larf, I Larf, I wee I pants, I make I leg go rusty."
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  8. #7
    Member James A's Avatar
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    Re: What to do now?

    Hi Busmat,

    I seem to remember that radger re-purposed an old fusee into a desk clock. If my memory serves he housed into a perspex box.

    Regards,

  9. #8
    Member Shangas's Avatar
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    Re: What to do now?

    I agree. If the movement is significant to you in some way, you should make it into a clock. That way it can continue to be useful :)
    "Pipes are occasionally of extraordinary interest...nothing has more individuality save, perhaps, watches and bootlaces."

    - Sherlock Holmes.

    'The Yellow Face'.

  10. #9
    Member Border-Reiver's Avatar
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    Re: What to do now?

    I cannot help it, but I this idea of making a wrist watch with a verge-fusee movement inside is really fascinating me. Unfortunately, all those verge-fusee movements I have separately and lying around are too large and heavy.

    So why not look through the COMPLETE watches in the collection?

    1. I have this very small verge-fusee watch, late 18th century I presume, which drives me nuts, as cannot really get the info I want. A Mr. Carré in Geneva, as shown on the dial, does not exist. There are several watchmakers by that name, but they are all in France. But that could also be a jeweler who had put his name on the dial. Then, on the movement, there is a name I can also not identify. It’s someone in Vienne, France (or is it Vienna in Austria, which is also spelled Vienne in French?), and not even the name can be ascertained correctly. The 'Jn' must be Johann, and then there is the German sharp s, ‘ß’, as it was written in those days in two letters. Total confusion.

    2. There is this Timex electronic which constantly stops running. I meanwhile tried all contacts, gave it new batteries, but I am out of my wits by now. And every time I want to get to the movement, I have to lift off the crystal to get it out, not to speak of all the problems letting it run with a loosely attached battery (held down with a finger) and the re-assembly, managing the act of the coupling of the external backside crown with the mechanics inside.

    So, what about throwing out all this electronic crap from the Timex and putting in the movement of the little verge fuse watch, and I can also use it’s dial and hands? The Timex case has the lugs and I have the springbars and I could nicely slip through that blue NATO strap I have with the correct width.

    Now you could say ‘what about the key wind issue?’ At first, I’ve thought, I could use the hole in the back of the Timex case which takes the battery, but the movement it is wound up from the front. But that is also no problem, to the contrary, I do not even have to worry about placing a whole in the right place. I have taken the crystal off this Timex watch many times before when trying to get inside, so why should I not carry with me that crystal lift and use it when the watch needs to be wound up (it’s a Bergeon by the way, which also adds some value to this unique combination). I would use the acrylic crystal from the Timex. First of all it already fits the case and secondly, these original glasses from the 18th century are much to delicate and break so easily – nothing for a wrist watch. It can also be disposed off with the no langer needed parts of both watches.

    @ moderator: Before I am banned from this forum, this is just a vague idea I am kicking around...
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    Last edited by Border-Reiver; February 26th, 2016 at 12:58.
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  11. #10
    Member radger's Avatar
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    Re: What to do now?

    Quote Originally Posted by James A View Post
    Hi Busmat,

    I seem to remember that radger re-purposed an old fusee into a desk clock. If my memory serves he housed into a perspex box.

    Regards,

    That's well remembered Jack, that's from a few years back.

    I did case up a movement in polycarbonate to protect it and with the intention of a desk clock....
    but in reality it sits locked in the back of a cupboard with other watches and such.

    I've never wound it for a couple of years, I've looked it out and wound it now though.
    Lovely to watch the escapement in action with its steady tick... tick... tick as the escape wheel unlocks every second beat.

    These old movements are curios nowadays but the best of these deserve to be protected as they have horological and
    historical interest.

    Matt, you could certainly re-purpose your movement as a desk clock or even a giant wristwatch.


    Cribbs fusee, spring detent pocket chronometer of Arnold/Earnshaw design.

    Original post
    https://forums.watchuseek.com/f6/true...ly-271792.html








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